2

I am trying to get rid of some references by using string representation of certain types. But compiler is not letting me do it the way I want in case of generic methods. I tried this:

IContainer container = components as IContainer;
Type type = Type.GetType("MyNamespace.MyType");
foreach (var component in container.Components.OfType<Type.GetType("MyNamespace.MyType")>()) {
    ...
}

And this:

foreach (var component in container.Components.OfType<type>()) {
    ...
}

For the first loop I get this: "Operator '<' cannot be applied to operands of type 'method group' and 'System.Type', and for the second the variable is out of scope for some reason. Why is this happening and is there a way around it? Thanks in advance.

5

You can use Type.MakeGenericType. Example:

Type.GetType("YourGenericType").MakeGenericType(Type.GetType("yourTypeParameter"))

Example for a List with a typeparameter determined from a string:

typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(Type.GetType("System.String"))

This gives you the same as

typeof(List<string>)

But you still can't use a Type instance to call Enumerable.OfType. You could use something like this instead:

foreach (var component in container.Components.Where(o => o.GetType().IsAssignableFrom(yourType))) 
{
    //...
}

Of course, this get's messy quickly, so I would consider changing your approach. Why do you wan't to use strings?

8
  • What should I put instead of "yourTypeParameter"? What kind of parameters?
    – Vale
    Jul 19 '11 at 7:09
  • Well, if you have, for example, a List<int>, int would be the typeparameter. Jul 19 '11 at 7:10
  • I still cannot get it. Same exception... Btw, the type I am trying to represent is not generic. Generic I am talking about is only OfType<>() method.
    – Vale
    Jul 19 '11 at 7:16
  • Oh, I missunderstood your question. I thought you were talking about generic TYPES, not methods. See my update. Jul 19 '11 at 7:20
  • 1
    You can specify 'object' in OfType/Cast and then use LINQ on resulting IEnumerable, e.g: container.Components.Cast<object>().Where(o => o.GetType().IsAssignableFrom(yourType))). Jul 19 '11 at 7:44
2

You can't use a variable in the place of the generic type argument (between < and >). It has to be a type determined at compile time.

But in your example this is already the case. Can't you just use

foreach (var component in container.Components.OfType<MyNamespace.MyType>()) {
...
}
2
  • I can't but I don't want to because I don't want to add reference to that namespace. Many reasons for that. The first: boss said... :)
    – Vale
    Jul 19 '11 at 7:30
  • but if you don't add a reference you can't use that type. Unless you load the assembly at run time... Jul 19 '11 at 7:32
0

You want this:

foreach (var component in container.Components.OfType<MyNamespace.MyType>()) {
...
}

Problem is you have to use the actual type expression in generics, not a string. You could construct the type using reflection if you really need to use the string.

2
  • 1
    He deosn't. He wants to do this without stating the type directly in code but by using a string with the name of the type. Of course, this isn't a very good idea, but it is what he wants... Jul 19 '11 at 7:08
  • How can I construct type using reflection?
    – Vale
    Jul 19 '11 at 7:33

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