111

I have the 1 button and some text in my HTML like the following:

function get_content(){
   // I don't know how to do in here!!!
}

<input type="button" onclick="get_content()" value="Get Content"/>
<p id='txt'>
<span class="A">I am</span>
<span class="B">working in </span>
<span class="C">ABC company.</span>
</p>

When the user clicks the button, the content in the <p id='txt'> will become the follow expected result:

<p id='txt'>
// All the HTML element within the <p> will be disappear
I am working in ABC company.
</p>

Can anyone help me how to write the javascript function? Thank you.

68

[2017-07-25] since this continues to be the accepted answer, despite being a very hacky solution, I'm incorporating Gabi's code into it, leaving my own to serve as a bad example.

<style>
.A {background: blue;}
.B {font-style: italic;}
.C {font-weight: bold;}
</style>

<script>
// my hacky approach:
function get_content() {
     var html = document.getElementById("txt").innerHTML;
     document.getElementById("txt").innerHTML = html.replace(/<[^>]*>/g, "");
}
// Gabi's elegant approach, but eliminating one unnecessary line of code:
function gabi_content() {
    var element = document.getElementById('txt');
    element.innerHTML = element.innerText || element.textContent;
}
// and exploiting the fact that IDs pollute the window namespace:
function txt_content() {
    txt.innerHTML = txt.innerText || txt.textContent;
}
</script>

<input type="button" onclick="get_content()" value="Get Content (bad)"/>
<input type="button" onclick="gabi_content()" value="Get Content (good)"/>
<input type="button" onclick="txt_content()" value="Get Content (shortest)"/>
<p id='txt'>
<span class="A">I am</span>
<span class="B">working in </span>
<span class="C">ABC company.</span>
</p>
  • 3
    Bad because hacky and slow. Is there even a guarantee that the rendered text itself must never contain tags? – Domi Jan 9 '14 at 14:19
  • 1
    no, there is no such guarantee. I gave a disclaimer when I posted. it apparently served the purpose of the OP. – jcomeau_ictx Jan 9 '14 at 17:12
  • 3
    Trying to parse HTML with regular expressions is really dangerous --- it's practically impossible (I suspect it may be theoretically impossible) to get right. There's too many edge cases and then your code blows up when faced with strange input, which can frequently be exploited to do XSS. – David Given Feb 4 '15 at 22:37
  • 2
    my guess as to why it was accepted: it's a complete answer, which can be immediately cut-and-pasted as is into an html file and tested with a browser. I never said it was a good answer. I posted after seeing all the good answers were there, and not accepted, and figured the OP needed a little handholding. it still is good enough for any application for which the HTML source is already known not to contain unbalanced angle brackets. – jcomeau_ictx Aug 29 '16 at 23:39
197

You can use this:

var element = document.getElementById('txt');
var text = element.innerText || element.textContent;
element.innerHTML = text;

Depending on what you need, you can use either element.innerText or element.textContent. They differ in many ways. innerText tries to approximate what would happen if you would select what you see (rendered html) and copy it to the clipboard, while textContent sort of just strips the html tags and gives you what's left.

innerText also has compatability with old IE browsers (came from there).

  • 3
    +1 - Was looking for some high performance text method since it gets done a lot in a loop. jQuery was not performant enough, but this was very fast. Worked in IE8+, chrome, ff. Perfect. – Travis J Apr 19 '13 at 19:48
  • 2
    On old IE, el.textContent will be undefined and el.innerText might be "". But "" || undefined is undefined. Using el.innerText || el.textContent || '' may be better. – Oriol Mar 12 '15 at 17:08
  • 3
    innerText doesn't return hidden text and content of script/style tags while textContent does. If you're on a version of IE which supports textContent, it might be preferable to use it first, so el.textContent || el.innerText || "". – Domino May 24 '15 at 16:21
  • 1
    Just a note for anyone reading this answer in present day, more than six years after this answer, these days you can just use var text = element.textContent;; unless for some ungodly reason you still have to support IE8 or below. – Useless Code Nov 21 '17 at 15:33
24

If you can use jquery then its simple

$("#txt").text()
  • 8
    I just have to say, look at all the pure JS answers and then look at this one. This is the second most important reason why I use jQuery (i.e., it simplifies tasks, reduces my workload, and increases readability). The first most important reason (to me) is because it handles many cross-compatibility issues, I might otherwise not even be aware of (like using jQuery to adjust opacity, so that I don't have to write a separate line just for IE8 to target the filter property. I know that pure JS is technically more efficient when it comes to speed, but that hardly matters anymore in most normal.. – VoidKing Oct 1 '13 at 14:22
  • 10
    Yada yada feature bloat... youmightnotneedjquery.com – Wes Johnson Mar 9 '14 at 20:24
  • 4
    pure js one liner equivalent: document.querySelector("#txt").innerText; People include the entire jQuery library far too often when their only need is a couple of lines of code. It's bad practice. – Levi Johansen Mar 11 '18 at 13:36
10

This answer will work to get just the text for any HTML element.

This first parameter "node" is the element to get the text from. The second parameter is optional and if true will add a space between the text within elements if no space would otherwise exist there.

function getTextFromNode(node, addSpaces) {
    var i, result, text, child;
    result = '';
    for (i = 0; i < node.childNodes.length; i++) {
        child = node.childNodes[i];
        text = null;
        if (child.nodeType === 1) {
            text = getTextFromNode(child, addSpaces);
        } else if (child.nodeType === 3) {
            text = child.nodeValue;
        }
        if (text) {
            if (addSpaces && /\S$/.test(result) && /^\S/.test(text)) text = ' ' + text;
            result += text;
        }
    }
    return result;
}
2

Depending on what you need, you can use either element.innerText or element.textContent. They differ in many ways. innerText tries to approximate what would happen if you would select what you see (rendered html) and copy it to the clipboard, while textContent sort of just strips the html tags and gives you what's left.

innerText is not just used for IE anymore, and it is supported in all major browsers. Of course, unlike textContent, it has compatability with old IE browsers (since they came up with it).

Complete example (from Gabi's answer):

var element = document.getElementById('txt');
var text = element.innerText || element.textContent; // or element.textContent || element.innerText
element.innerHTML = text;
2

This works for me compiled based on what was said here with a more modern standard. This works best for multiple looks up.

let element = document.querySelectorAll('.myClass')
  element.forEach(item => {
    console.log(item.innerHTML = item.innerText || item.textContent)
  })
1

That should work:

function get_content(){
   var p = document.getElementById("txt");
   var spans = p.getElementsByTagName("span");
   var text = '';
   for (var i = 0; i < spans.length; i++){
       text += spans[i].innerHTML;
   }

   p.innerHTML = text;
}

Try this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/7gnyc/2/

1
function get_content(){
 var returnInnerHTML = document.getElementById('A').innerHTML + document.getElementById('B').innerHTML + document.getElementById('A').innerHTML;
 document.getElementById('txt').innerHTML = returnInnerHTML;
}

That should do it.

0

Try (short version of Gabi answer idea)

function get_content() {
   txt.innerHTML = txt.textContent;
}

function get_content() {
   txt.innerHTML = txt.textContent ;
}
span { background: #fbb}
<input type="button" onclick="get_content()" value="Get Content"/>
<p id='txt'>
<span class="A">I am</span>
<span class="B">working in </span>
<span class="C">ABC company.</span>
</p>

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