2

i recently decompiled a bit of Java code, but parts are in a syntax I don't understand. I've searched for this but many threads I see say that code similar to this is compiler dependant. On java syntax checks, this returns errors.

public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            final InputStream inputSocketInputStream = inputSocket.getInputStream();
            final OutputStream inputSocketOutputStream = inputSocket.getOutputStream();
            Socket socket = new Socket();
            socket.connect(new InetSocketAddress(APJP.APJP_LOCAL_HTTP_SERVER_ADDRESS, APJP.APJP_LOCAL_HTTP_SERVER_PORT));
            final InputStream outputSocketInputStream = socket.getInputStream();
            final OutputStream outputSocketOutputStream = socket.getOutputStream();
            Thread thread = new Thread() {

                final InputStream val$inputSocketInputStream;
                final OutputStream val$outputSocketOutputStream;
                final HTTPProxyServerWorker this$0;

                public void run()
                {
                    try
                    {
                        byte abyte0[] = new byte[5120];
                        for(int i = 0; (i = inputSocketInputStream.read(abyte0)) != -1;)
                        {
                            outputSocketOutputStream.write(abyte0, 0, i);
                        }

                        outputSocketOutputStream.close();
                    }
                    catch(Exception exception1) { }
                }


            {
                this$0 = HTTPProxyServerWorker.this;
                inputSocketInputStream = inputstream;
                outputSocketOutputStream = outputstream;
                super();
            }
            };
            thread.start();
            /** OMITTED **/
    }

I am confused about this bit:

Thread thread = new Thread() {

                final InputStream val$inputSocketInputStream;
                final OutputStream val$outputSocketOutputStream;
                final HTTPProxyServerWorker this$0;

                public void run()
                {
                    try
                    {
                        byte abyte0[] = new byte[5120];
                        for(int i = 0; (i = inputSocketInputStream.read(abyte0)) != -1;)
                        {
                            outputSocketOutputStream.write(abyte0, 0, i);
                        }

                        outputSocketOutputStream.close();
                    }
                    catch(Exception exception1) { }
                }

            //WHAT IS THIS BELOW? Constructor?
            {
                this$0 = HTTPProxyServerWorker.this; 
                inputSocketInputStream = inputstream;
                outputSocketOutputStream = outputstream;
                super();
            }
            };

Can anyone explain how this bit of code is supposed to work?

  • @matt b: But assuming that input- and outputstream are defined in the outer block (presumably true) this is perfectly valid java. – Voo Jul 19 '11 at 15:22
  • @Voo - val$inputStream is a valid identifier but the $ has no special meaning - so it's odd that the decompiler produces uninitialized declarations, unless the assignment is just omitted here. However the larger point stands. – matt b Jul 19 '11 at 15:25
4

This is non static initialization block. It is common that decompiler converts bytecode in non-compiling source. IMHO best code is produced by JD Decompiler. This variables

            final InputStream val$inputSocketInputStream;
            final OutputStream val$outputSocketOutputStream;
            final HTTPProxyServerWorker this$0;

are interpretation of accessing final local variables from nonstatic inner classes. Variable this$0 refers to outer class instance containing inner class instance. In this case the inner class is anonymous so there is initialization block instead of constructor. We can said that variables with $ are generated by compiler. In fact this is decompilers' interpretation of the bytecode.

  • So what does the val$ mean in here? I can see this$0 being defined in the initialization block, but how do the val$ get defined? By compiler? So should val$inputSocketInputStream = inputSocketInputStream in the outer class? – jabbany Jul 19 '11 at 15:19
  • val$ is only a part of whole identifier. Variable val$inputSocketInputStream links to final static variable so anonymous inner class can access it. The compiler got lost here a little bit. The val$ was added due to name confilct. And yes in initialization block there should be val$inputSocketInputStream = inputstream; – zacheusz Jul 19 '11 at 15:20
  • So does it mean that val$inputSocketInputStream is a link to the final static variable inputSocketInputStream defined on line 5? – jabbany Jul 19 '11 at 15:23
  • 1
    to be clear, the $ in the variable name has no special meaning. $ is a valid character to use in a symbol name, it's just so rarely used (and almost always a sign that something was automatically produced). – matt b Jul 19 '11 at 15:26
0
{
  this$0 = HTTPProxyServerWorker.this; 
  inputSocketInputStream = inputstream;
  outputSocketOutputStream = outputstream;
  super();
}

This block initialises the inner class implicit variables.

Suppose you declare a class with an (non-static) inner class:

public class Outter {
  private int a = 1;

  class Inner {
    void doSomethingToOutter() {
      a += 1;
    }
  }
}

The Inner class will implicitely get additional members that will get initialised to this when Outter is constructed. Try to decompile this sample to see what you get.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.