9

My idea is as follows: I want to send multiple requests simultaneously without having to wait until priors execution.

So my pseudo code looks as follows:

function sleep(ms) {
  return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));
}

function failingRequest(){
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        reject('Request failed');
    });
}

function successRequest(){
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        resolve('Request success');
    });
}

async function main() {
    try {
        let executions = [];
        executions.push(failingRequest());
        await sleep(4000);
        executions.push(successRequest());
        let result = await Promise.allSettled(executions);
        console.log(result);
    } catch (err) {
        console.log('Outer error occured.');
        console.log(err.message);
    }

    console.log('done');
}
main();

Running this code here works as intended in the browser but gives me following output running with node:

node:761) UnhandledPromiseRejectionWarning: Request failed
api/cli.html#cli_unhandled_rejections_mode). (rejection id: 1)
(node:761) [DEP0018] DeprecationWarning: Unhandled promise rejections are deprecated. In the future, promise rejections that are not handled will terminate the Node.js process with a non-zero exi not handled will terminate the Node.js process with a non-zero exit code.
[
  { status: 'rejected', reason: 'Request failed' },
  { status: 'fulfilled', value: 'Request success' }
]
done
(node:761) PromiseRejectionHandledWarning: Promise rejection was handled asynchronously (rejection id: 1)

Any idea why this is happening?

Note that I only inserted sleep so I could test if the catch block will be executed in case the first request fails WHICH WOULD NOT BE THE DESIRED BEHAVIOR. I want to initiate those requests all at the same time and I do not care if one fails. I want to check later with let result = await Promise.allSettled(executions); which requests worked and which failed. I hope this is clear.

3

3 Answers 3

6

Interesting question - the problem is that you're not actually simulating async requests. In fact your two request-methods are simply creating promises which are resolved/rejected synchronously/immediately. You would need to put await before failingRequest() in order for the rejected promise to be caught in the surrounding try/catch but this is probably not what you want.

Instead you should not "start" the promises immediately, it should rather be something like:

try {
        let executions = [];
        executions.push(failingRequest);
        await sleep(4000);
        executions.push(successRequest);
        let result = await Promise.allSettled(executions.map(promiseFn => promiseFn()));
        console.log(result);
    } catch (err) {
        console.log('Outer error occured.');
        console.log(err.message);
    }

This will log

[
  { status: 'rejected', reason: 'Request failed' },
  { status: 'fulfilled', value: 'Request success' }
]
done

as expected.

7
  • Interesting answer aswell. I did not think of that and it seems to work... But going back to my original test: Would this prevent executing the catch block if lets say a request times out after 10 seconds? I need to be sure all executions will be executed no matter if they resolve or reject individually.
    – FabZbi
    Commented May 12, 2021 at 12:34
  • Yes, if you do it this way, it is guaranteed that all executions will be executed. You can even simulate it by adding a setTimeout in your request-functions. I've created a fiddle for you with a modified version of your code that maybe helps you understand what's going on: jsfiddle.net/1rfpksvu
    – eol
    Commented May 12, 2021 at 13:24
  • 1
    This is awesome! I was wondering how I would apply arguments to those functions but .bind() did the trick. Thanks!
    – FabZbi
    Commented May 12, 2021 at 13:37
  • I don't get why you would do this. You could equally just move the await sleep(4000); line before the creation of the executions array.
    – Bergi
    Commented May 12, 2021 at 14:21
  • The point I tried to make is that the promises were executed synchronously/immediately with OP's original code and that the immediately rejected promise was not caught anymore due to the await sleep(..). Of course, in my example, the await sleep does not make a lot of sense, but I decided to keep it in order for the OP to understand.
    – eol
    Commented May 12, 2021 at 14:38
0

Any idea why this is happening?

You create the failingRequest() and then wait 4 seconds before handling it.

I only inserted sleep so I could test

… and thereby you caused the unhandled rejection. Remove the await sleep(4000); and it'll work as expected!

2
  • If I add those functions 1 Million times like so let executions = []; for(let i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) { executions.push(failingRequest()); executions.push(successRequest()); } The first rejection does not seem to be handled immediately either and still there will not by any Unhandled promise rejection...
    – FabZbi
    Commented May 12, 2021 at 12:37
  • Yes it is handled immediately (=synchronously) by the Promise.allSettled(executions) call. But then it waits 4 seconds afterwards for the settling of these promises, before logging the result of all executions.
    – Bergi
    Commented May 12, 2021 at 12:40
0

Your code first calls failingRequest, which creates a promise that is rejected immediately. JavaScript pushes this rejected promise to the microtask queue to be processed right after the main function has completed.

JavaScript continues the execution of main and when it runs await sleep(4000), it returns control to the event loop (so JavaScript can resume it 4 seconds later). The event loop pulls a task from the microtask queue, which is the failingRequest promise; JavaScript notices it doesn't have a .catch() or a Promise.allSettled() handler and throws the UnhandledPromiseRejection error.

If you don't return control to the event loop between the time the promises are created and added to Promise.allSettled, Promise.allSettled runs before the failingRequest message is processed from the microtask queue, resulting in Promise.allSettled handling the promise rejection by marking it as rejected.

These links provide additional details:

  1. Microtasks
  2. Run-to-completion (*)
  3. Zero delays
  4. Using Promises - Guarantees

(*) To be more precise, the event loop doesn't wait for the main function to finish, but instead waits for the current synchronous code to finish. In this case, it's the code up to the await sleep(4000); line. After this line, the main function is paused, and the event loop can handle other tasks, including the rejected failingRequest promise.

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