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Question 1: How to properly move ownership of the data, in an inner loop, so that once the final iteration gets done, the container iterated will be Drop()ed.

For example:

let left_strs: Vec<String> = Self::allowed(&slice[..i]);
let right_strs: Vec<String> = Self::allowed(&slice[i..]);
for left_str in left_strs{
    // how to properly move the ownership of the data here?
    for right_str in right_strs.iter(){
        ans.push(format!("({}, {})", left_str, right_str));
    }
}

Question 2: For all the data in the vector, its ownership has been moved, and it has been Drop()ed eventually, will the vector(container) be automatically Drop()ed because of this?

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  • 2
    It's difficult to answer your question without a minimal working example showing your problem. Why do you need the container to be dropped at that point? What errors are you getting currently and why would moving be the solution? – Emoun May 13 at 8:09
  • 2
    well, you can not...it makes no sense, if you move ownership into the inner loop right_strs will be drop after the first iteration. – Netwave May 13 at 8:45
  • 1
    There's no particular reason to move ownership anyway, format!() doesn't consume the arguments it builds a new string. – kmdreko May 13 at 14:44
  • Thanks for all the above replies, which I learned from. – Leon May 13 at 19:09
  • @Emoun, thanks for your reply. I am a newbie, and just wildly exploring the possibilities now :). – Leon May 13 at 19:10
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Easiest thing that comes to my mind is to use a new scope:

fn main() {
    let left_strs: Vec<String> = vec!["one".to_string(), "two".to_string()];
    {
        let right_strs: Vec<String> = vec!["one".to_string(), "two".to_string()];
        // use a & on left_strs to avoid move
        for left_str in &left_strs {            
            for right_str in right_strs.iter() {
                println!("({}, {})", left_str, right_str);
            }
        }
    // right_strs is drop
    }
    // we can still use left_strs, since we used a & before
    for s in left_strs {
        println!("{}", s);
    }
}

This way, right_strs will be drop when the scope ends.

Playground

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  • This hits the spot! – Leon May 13 at 19:09

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