-1

I have made a <stdio.h> only strcmp equivalent... "ish" But i WOULD like to know. Is there something i've skipped and/or should fix, if i decide to use this as a substitute for strcmp?


DISCLAIMER:: I have no intend to actually substitute strcmp from my daily usage, but I would like to know if I'm currently able to create a similar substitute for it.


code for it:

#include <stdio.h>
// #include <ctype.h> // Optional

typedef char string[20];

int stringcmp(string str1, string str2);
int strcount(string str);

int main (void)
{
    string cmp1, cmp2;

    printf("cmp1: ");
    scanf("%s", cmp1);
    
    printf("cmp2: ");
    scanf("%s", cmp2);

    // If you want the function to be ran Case-Insensitive, [ctype] library might be your friend
    int result = stringcmp(cmp1, cmp2);

    printf("(%i)\n", result);
    return result;
}

int strcount(string str)
{
    int i = 0;
    while(str[i] != '\0')
    {
        i++;
    }
    return i;
}

int stringcmp(string str1, string str2)
{
    int imax = strcount(str1);

    if (imax < strcount(str2))
    {
        imax = strcount(str2);
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < imax; i++)
    {
        if (str1[i] < str2[i])
        {
            return 1;
        }
        else if (str1[i] > str2[i])
        {
            return 2;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

the function in topic makes usage of another one, by the way. Is that a problem in any way?

12
  • note: besides the limited space of 20 chars per string May 13 at 13:14
  • @BuildSucceeded. It's supposed to be a <stdio.h>-only method May 13 at 13:14
  • 1
    You don't have to limit yourself to a max size, just as strcmp doesn't. Besides, 19 + '\0' characters is pretty small for a string. May 13 at 13:18
  • It's not clear what help you want. You've defined two function which obviously differ from the stdlib ones (for example, the types are different, and the return values are different). Have you tested the functions? Do they not do something you expect? May 13 at 13:19
  • 1
    @GustavoDuarte you might try codereview.stackexchange.com as a place where people will give you feedback on code. Stackoverflow tends to be for solving specific problems. May 13 at 13:25
1

For starters the function declaration is incorrect.

In fact your function declaration after adjusting the parameters by the compiler looks like

int stringcmp( char *str1, char *str2);

while the declaration of the standard function strcmp looks like

int strcmp(const char *str1, const char *str2);

That is the function deals with pointers to constant strings because within the function passed strings are not changed.

To compare two strings there is no any need to calculate their lengths. It is just inefficient. Moreover you shall use the type size_t instead of the type int to store a length of a string because an object of the type int can be not large enough to store values of lengths of strings.

Also there is an explicit bug in your approach

if (str1[i] < str2[i])
{
    return 1;
}
else if (str1[i] > str2[i])
{
    return 2;
}

because you are returning a positive value ( 1 ) when the first string is less than the second string while the standard C function strcmp returns a negative value in this case. and vice versa when the first string is greater than the second string you are returning again a positive value ( 2 ).

From the C Standard (7.23.4.2 The strcmp function)

3 The strcmp function returns an integer greater than, equal to, or less than zero, accordingly as the string pointed to by s1 is greater than, equal to, or less than the string pointed to by s2.

And moreover the elements of strings shall be compared as objects of the type unsigned char.

Consider the following demonstrative program.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <limits.h>

int main(void) 
{
    char s1[] = { CHAR_MIN, '\0' };
    char s2[] = { CHAR_MAX, '\0' };
    
    printf( "s1 is greater than s2 is %s\n", 0 < strcmp( s1, s2 ) ? "true" : "false" );
    
    return 0;
}

Its output is

s1 is greater than s2 is true

In fact the arrays are declared like

    char s1[] = { -128, '\0' };
    char s2[] = { 127, '\0' };

provided that the type char behaves as the type signed char (that is usually the default behavior of the type char for many compilers).

So if the elements of the arrays will be compared as objects of the type char then you will get an opposite result to the result of the standard C function strcmp.

The function can be much simpler defined for example the following way

int stringcmp( const char *str1, const char *str2 )
{
    while ( *str1 && *str1 == *str2 )
    {
        ++str1;
        ++str2;
    }
    
    return ( unsigned char )*str1 - ( unsigned char )*str2;
}

As you can see there is no any need to calculate preliminary lengths of the strings.

8
  • I'm sorry but can I didn't understand char s1 is greater then char s2. Could you help me with some further explanation? May 13 at 14:44
  • @GustavoDuarte It is unclear what you mean. May 13 at 14:49
  • sorry. what I meant was: "I didn't understand WHY [...] May 13 at 14:52
  • also, what's the purpose of while ( *str1 && *str1 == *str2 ) couldn't it be simply while (*str1 == *str2 )? what did I miss? I appreciated your answer very much! May 13 at 14:55
  • @GustavoDuarte I think you mean my demonstrative program. If to compare characters as signed values then it is evident that -128 is less than 127. Internally -128 is stored in memory as 11111111 where the most significant bit is the zero bit while 127 is stored like 01111111. But if to compare them as unsigned characters then the sign bit is considered as a value bit and the value 11111111 is now equal to 255. 255 is greater than 127. May 13 at 14:56
-1

It seems like it would work, although strcmp does not return 0, 1, and 2, but 0, <0, and >0.

See https://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strcmp/ for reference.

1
  • indeed! But if you ask your shell to return it echoing $?, it returns 255 (as it isn't capable of returning "-1", i suppose... I'm not sure, though) May 13 at 13:18
-1

By the way, why not use string.c_str()?


strcmp(string str1,string str2) will:

return an a number less than zero if str1 < str2
return zero if str1 == str2
return an a number more than zero if str1 > str2

so your function should imitate this behavior

int stringcmp(string str1, string str2)
{
    int imax = strcount(str1);

    if (imax < strcount(str2))
    {
        imax = strcount(str2);
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < imax; i++)
    {
        if (str1[i] == 0 && str2[i] == 0) return 0;
        if (str1[i] == 0) return 1;
        if (str2[i] == 0) return -1;
        if (str1[i] < str2[i])
        {
            return -1;
        }
        else if (str1[i] > str2[i])
        {
            return 1;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
1
-3

#include<stdio.h> #include<string.h>

int main(){  
printf("%d",strcmp("hell ","hell"));
}

bro scanf dosent scan white spaces but if you run the above code white spaces play an important role it prints 1; so check alternative

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