I'm adding an html5 drag and drop uploader to my page.

When a file is dropped into the upload area, everything works great.

However, if I accidentally drop the file outside of the upload area, the browser loads the local file as if it is a new page.

How can I prevent this behavior?

Thanks!

  • 2
    Just curious what code you are using to handle the html5 drag/drop uploading. Thanks. – robertwbradford Jul 31 '11 at 3:52
  • The problem you have is caused by either missing e.dataTransfer() or missing a preventDefault() on drop/dragenter/etc. events. But I can't tell without a code sample. – HoldOffHunger Apr 12 at 14:54
up vote 232 down vote accepted

You can add a event listener to the window that calls preventDefault() on all dragover and drop events.
Example:

window.addEventListener("dragover",function(e){
  e = e || event;
  e.preventDefault();
},false);
window.addEventListener("drop",function(e){
  e = e || event;
  e.preventDefault();
},false);
  • 25
    dragover is the piece I was missing. – cgatian Feb 17 '14 at 14:48
  • 4
    I confirm that both dragover and drop handlers are needed to prevent the browser from loading the dropped file. (Chrome latest 2015/08/03). The solution works on FF latest, too. – Offirmo Aug 3 '15 at 12:23
  • 2
    This works perfectly, and I can confirm that it can be used in combination with page elements that are configured to accept drop events, such as those from drag-and-drop file upload scrips like resumable.js. It is useful to prevent the default browser behavior in cases where a user accidentally drops a file they want to upload outside of the actual file-upload drop-zone, and then wonders why they now see that same file rendered directly in the browser window (assuming a compatible file type like an image or video was dropped), rather than the expected behavior of seeing their file upload. – bluebinary Aug 8 '16 at 0:24
  • 9
    Note: this also disables dragging files onto a <input type="file" />. It is necessary to check whether e.target is a file input and let such events through. – Sebastian Nowak Oct 19 '16 at 19:39
  • 3
    what ? why should window dragover load the file ? this makes no sense ... – L.Trabacchin Jan 26 at 14:53

After a lot of fiddling around, I found this to be the stablest solution:

var dropzoneId = "dropzone";

window.addEventListener("dragenter", function(e) {
  if (e.target.id != dropzoneId) {
    e.preventDefault();
    e.dataTransfer.effectAllowed = "none";
    e.dataTransfer.dropEffect = "none";
  }
}, false);

window.addEventListener("dragover", function(e) {
  if (e.target.id != dropzoneId) {
    e.preventDefault();
    e.dataTransfer.effectAllowed = "none";
    e.dataTransfer.dropEffect = "none";
  }
});

window.addEventListener("drop", function(e) {
  if (e.target.id != dropzoneId) {
    e.preventDefault();
    e.dataTransfer.effectAllowed = "none";
    e.dataTransfer.dropEffect = "none";
  }
});
<div id="dropzone">...</div>

Setting both effectAllow and dropEffect unconditionally on the window causes my drop zone not to accept any d-n-d any longer, regardless whether the properties are set new or not.

  • e.dataTransfer() is the critical piece here that makes this work, which the "accepted answer" failed to mention. – HoldOffHunger Apr 12 at 14:53

For jQuery the correct answer will be:

$(document).on({
    dragover: function() {
        return false;
    },
    drop: function() {
        return false;
    }
});

Here return false will behave as event.preventDefault() and event.stopPropagation().

To allow drag-and-drop only on some elements, you could do something like:

window.addEventListener("dragover",function(e){
  e = e || event;
  console.log(e);
  if (e.target.tagName != "INPUT") { // check which element is our target
    e.preventDefault();
  }
},false);
window.addEventListener("drop",function(e){
  e = e || event;
  console.log(e);
  if (e.target.tagName != "INPUT") {  // check which element is our target
    e.preventDefault();
  }  
},false);

Preventing all drag and drop operations by default might not be what you want. It's possible to check if the drag source is an external file, at least in some browsers. I've included a function to check if the drag source is an external file in this StackOverflow answer.

Modifying Digital Plane's answer, you could do something like this:

function isDragSourceExternalFile() {
     // Defined here: 
     // https://stackoverflow.com/a/32044172/395461
}

window.addEventListener("dragover",function(e){
    e = e || event;
    var IsFile = isDragSourceExternalFile(e.originalEvent.dataTransfer);
    if (IsFile) e.preventDefault();
},false);
window.addEventListener("drop",function(e){
    e = e || event;
    var IsFile = isDragSourceExternalFile(e.originalEvent.dataTransfer);
    if (IsFile) e.preventDefault();
},false);
  • 1
    What's the point of e || event;? Where is event defined? Nevermind. It looks like it's a global object in IE? I found this quote, "In Microsoft Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript), you must access the event object through the window object." here – 1.21 gigawatts Jan 17 '17 at 5:48

try this:

document.body.addEventListener('drop', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
}, false);

To build on the "check the target" method outlined in a few other answers, here is a more generic/functional method:

function preventDefaultExcept(predicates) {
  return function (e) {
    var passEvery = predicates.every(function (predicate) { return predicate(e); })
    if (!passEvery) {
      e.preventDefault();
    }
  };
}

Called like:

function isDropzone(e) { return e.target.id === 'dropzone'; }
function isntParagraph(e) { return e.target.tagName !== 'p'; }

window.addEventListener(
  'dragover',
  preventDefaultExcept([isDropzone, isntParagraph])
);
window.addEventListener(
  'drop',
  preventDefaultExcept([isDropzone])
);
  • Also, could add some ES6 here: function preventDefaultExcept(...predicates){}. And then use it like preventDefaultExcept(isDropzone, isntParagraph) – hlfrmn Aug 16 at 11:47

I have an HTML object (embed) that fills the width and height of the page. The answer by @digital-plane works on normal web pages but not if the user drops onto an embedded object. So I needed a different solution.

If we switch to using the event capture phase we can get the events before the embedded object receives them (notice the true value at the end of the event listener call):

// document.body or window
document.body.addEventListener("dragover", function(e){
  e = e || event;
  e.preventDefault();
  console.log("over true");
}, true);

document.body.addEventListener("drop", function(e){
  e = e || event;
  e.preventDefault();
  console.log("drop true");
}, true);

Using the following code (based on @digital-plane's answer) the page becomes a drag target, it prevents object embeds from capturing the events and then loads our images:

document.body.addEventListener("dragover", function(e){
  e = e || event;
  e.preventDefault();
  console.log("over true");
}, true);

document.body.addEventListener("drop",function(e){
  e = e || event;
  e.preventDefault();
  console.log("Drop true");

  // begin loading image data to pass to our embed
  var droppedFiles = e.dataTransfer.files;
  var fileReaders = {};
  var files = {};
  var reader;

  for (var i = 0; i < droppedFiles.length; i++) {
    files[i] = droppedFiles[i]; // bc file is ref is overwritten
    console.log("File: " + files[i].name + " " + files[i].size);
    reader = new FileReader();
    reader.file = files[i]; // bc loadend event has no file ref

    reader.addEventListener("loadend", function (ev, loadedFile) {
      var fileObject = {};
      var currentReader = ev.target;

      loadedFile = currentReader.file;
      console.log("File loaded:" + loadedFile.name);
      fileObject.dataURI = currentReader.result;
      fileObject.name = loadedFile.name;
      fileObject.type = loadedFile.type;
      // call function on embed and pass file object
    });

    reader.readAsDataURL(files[i]);
  }

}, true);

Tested on Firefox on Mac.

I am using a class selector for multiple upload areas so my solution took this less pure form

Based on Axel Amthor's answer, with dependency on jQuery (aliased to $)

_stopBrowserFromOpeningDragAndDropPDFFiles = function () {

        _preventDND = function(e) {
            if (!$(e.target).is($(_uploadBoxSelector))) {
                e.preventDefault();
                e.dataTransfer.effectAllowed = 'none';
                e.dataTransfer.dropEffect = 'none';
            }
        };

        window.addEventListener('dragenter', function (e) {
            _preventDND(e);
        }, false);

        window.addEventListener('dragover', function (e) {
            _preventDND(e);
        });

        window.addEventListener('drop', function (e) {
            _preventDND(e);
        });
    },

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.