24

I want to split strings only once based on multiple delimiters like "and", "&" and "-" in that order. Example:

'121 34 adsfd' -> ['121 34 adsfd']
'dsfsd and adfd' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
'dsfsd & adfd' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
'dsfsd - adfd' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
'dsfsd and adfd and adsfa' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd and adsfa']
'dsfsd and adfd - adsfa' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd - adsfa']
'dsfsd - adfd and adsfa' -> ['dsfsd - adfd ', ' adsfa']

I tried the below code to achieve this:

import re
re.split('and|&|-', string, maxsplit=1)

It works for all cases except the last one. As it does not follow the hierarchy, for the last one it returns:

'dsfsd - adfd and adsfa' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd and adsfa']

How can I achieve this?

3
  • 1
    I'm not sure that regex supports this type of operation (I would be happy and interested to be proved wrong!). Perhaps you could look at constructing a grammar with something like parsy. – colelemonz May 17 at 18:08
  • 8
    Perhaps you could try splitting on 'and', then if it didn't split try splitting on '&', then try '-'. Not the most elegant, but it would get the job done. – nullromo May 17 at 18:11
  • The problem is, that the regex parser needs to start over from beginning ^ with the new alternations to achieve your order. Further the initial part needs to be consumed. If you can use PyPI regex, a generic idea would be res = regex.split(r"^(?:.*?\Kand|.*?\K&|.*?\K-)", s) – bobble bubble May 17 at 19:27
23

Try:

import re

tests = [
    ["121 34 adsfd", ["121 34 adsfd"]],
    ["dsfsd and adfd", ["dsfsd ", " adfd"]],
    ["dsfsd & adfd", ["dsfsd ", " adfd"]],
    ["dsfsd - adfd", ["dsfsd ", " adfd"]],
    ["dsfsd and adfd and adsfa", ["dsfsd ", " adfd and adsfa"]],
    ["dsfsd and adfd - adsfa", ["dsfsd ", " adfd - adsfa"]],
    ["dsfsd - adfd and adsfa", ["dsfsd - adfd ", " adsfa"]],
]

for s, result in tests:
    res = re.split(r"and|&(?!.*and)|-(?!.*and|.*&)", s, maxsplit=1)
    print(res)
    assert res == result

Prints:

['121 34 adsfd']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd and adsfa']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd - adsfa']
['dsfsd - adfd ', ' adsfa']

Explanation:

The regex and|&(?!.*and)|-(?!.*and|.*&) uses 3 alternatives.

  1. We match and always or:
  2. We match & only if there isn't and ahead (using the negative look-ahead (?! ) or:
  3. We match - only if there isn't and or & ahead.

We're using this pattern in re.sub -> splitting only on the first match.

4
  • Good and relatively short pattern. – Casimir et Hippolyte May 17 at 18:30
  • 1
    @AndrejKesely thanks! this worked for me. Can you also explain how it is working? – Ank May 17 at 18:33
  • @Ank the regex is using negative look-ahead (?! ) - we will match - only if there isn't and or & ahead. – Andrej Kesely May 17 at 18:38
  • 3
    regex used in a loop should be compiled before the loop. The total time will be reduced by about 25%. – Z4-tier May 18 at 6:03
35

This would be impractical with a single regular expression. You could get it to work with negative lookbehinds, but it would get quite complicated with each additional delimiter. It's pretty trivial to do this with plain old str.split() and multiple lines. All you have to do is check if splitting with the current delimiter gives you two elements. If it does, that's your answer. If not, move on to the next delimiter:

def split_new(inp, delims):
    for d in delims:
        result = inp.split(d, maxsplit=1)
        if len(result) == 2: return result

    return [inp] # If nothing worked, return the input

To test this:

teststrs = ['121 34 adsfd' , 'dsfsd and adfd', 'dsfsd & adfd' , 'dsfsd - adfd' , 'dsfsd and adfd and adsfa' , 'dsfsd and adfd - adsfa' , 'dsfsd - adfd and adsfa' ]
for t in teststrs:
    print(repr(t), '->', split_new(t, ['and', '&', '-']))

outputs

'121 34 adsfd' -> ['121 34 adsfd']
'dsfsd and adfd' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
'dsfsd & adfd' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
'dsfsd - adfd' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
'dsfsd and adfd and adsfa' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd and adsfa']
'dsfsd and adfd - adsfa' -> ['dsfsd ', ' adfd - adsfa']
'dsfsd - adfd and adsfa' -> ['dsfsd - adfd ', ' adsfa']
3
  • 13
    Simple, readable and it's easy to add more delimiters. – Casimir et Hippolyte May 17 at 18:31
  • 1
    I'd also do it like this. However this is another way to put it, that's even nicer, at least to me. – jaaq May 18 at 13:03
  • 8
    This. so much better than the regex in the accepted answer, which will make you hate yourself if you'll have to modify it one year from now. – Berend May 18 at 13:21
4

You can keep a list of the delimiters, ordered by their value. Then, you can combine re.split with re.findall to only use delimiters produced from the latter that are the least valuable in the split, per the ranking in ops:

import re
def split_order(s):
   r, ops = re.findall('(?<=\s)and(?=\s)|\&|\-', s), ['and', '&', '-']
   m = -1 if not r else min([ops.index(i) for i in r])
   a, *b = re.split('|'.join(l:=[i for i in r if ops.index(i) == m]), s)
   return [s] if not l else ([a] if not b else [a, s[len(a)+len(l[0]):]])


vals = ['121 34 adsfd' , 'dsfsd and adfd', 'dsfsd & adfd' , 'dsfsd - adfd' , 'dsfsd and adfd and adsfa' , 'dsfsd and adfd - adsfa' , 'dsfsd - adfd and adsfa' ]
for i in vals:
   print(split_order(i))

Output:

['121 34 adsfd']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd and adsfa']
['dsfsd ', ' adfd - adsfa']
['dsfsd - adfd ', ' adsfa']

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