1

Considering the following example :

import java.lang.System;

interface Copy {
    
}

class Impl implements Copy {
    
    public <T extends Copy> T copy() {
        return (T)new Impl();
    }
    
    public void method() { System.out.println("hello"); }
    
}

public class MyClass {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
      var impl = new Impl();
      impl.method();
      var copy = impl.copy(); // deduction fails here
      copy.method();
    }
}

Is there a way to make it deduce the type while still using var ?

Note: If I replace var copy = impl.copy(); by Impl copy = impl.copy(); the compiler gets it.

Running with OpenJDK 11.0.6

4
  • 5
    Why do you exepct copy to be an Impl? The compiler only knows that it has to be a T extends Copy without any further constraints. The only thing it knows about it for sure is that it's a Copy. Also be aware that the unconstraint T extends Copy is actually kind of a lie and the method contains an unchecked cast which breaks the type system. AnotherClassImplementingCopy x = impl.copy() would compile but break at runtime. May 20 at 8:52
  • My thought was that was T would be deduced by the compiler by looking at the return type of the function. But the cas to T in the return should have get my attention in the first place !
    – dkg
    May 20 at 11:41
  • Also thanks for the "kind of a lie" thing, generics in java kind of disturbs me.
    – dkg
    May 20 at 11:42
  • The one thing you have to keep in mind is that the generics type system is correct if and only if all involved code compiles without warning. So whenever you see a warning like "unchecked cast" (the most common one) you know that there's a chance that you're breaking generics. There are ways to make the method you wrote safe (usually by passing in a Class<T>), but they make the method harder to use. May 20 at 12:19
7

When you use var, there is no way for the compiler to infer the type of T and in Java generics are compile time constructs and with type erasure, all the generic syntax is removed at runtime. If you just want to use var, you can explicitly specify the generic type:

var copy = impl.<Impl>copy();

You can also simply write:

public Copy copy()
{
    return new Impl();
}

This introduces the same constraint that T extends Copy does.

I'm not sure what you are exactly trying to achieve but usually, an interface is a contract which specifies that any class that implements it must contain all the methods of that interface. Your interface does not contain any methods, its just a marker interface like Serializable. If you are trying to enforce that any class that implements Copy must contain a copy method, then the interface must define the signature of this method:

interface Copy {
    public Copy copy(); 
}

class Impl implements Copy {
    
    @Override
    public Impl copy() {
        return new Impl();
    }
    
    public void method() { System.out.println("hello"); }
}

class MyClass {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
      var impl = new Impl();
      impl.method();
      var copy = impl.copy(); 
      copy.method();
 
    }
}

Java supports covariant return types and hence you don't even need generics in the first place. You can observe that in Impl I've defined the method as public Impl copy() and it still works becuase Impl implements Copy.

Also, it's worth noting that your copy() method doesn't technically copy, it returns a new instance. You may have intended this behaviour but this can be misleading for someone else that comes across your code.

A better name for your interface may be Copyable.

1
  • 1
    Thanks for the answer. I was trying to do an mcve, hence I deleted the copy() method from the interface. Didn't know about covariant return types ! Sounds good :)
    – dkg
    May 20 at 11:37

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