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In R 4.1 (May 2021) a native pipe operator was introduced that is "more streamlined" than previous implementations. I already noticed one difference between the native |> and the magrittr pipe %>%, namely 2 %>% sqrt works but 2 |> sqrt doesn't and has to be written as 2 |> sqrt(). Are there more differences and pitfalls to be aware of when using the native pipe operator?

2

5 Answers 5

106
Topic Magrittr 2.0.3 Base 4.3.0
Operator %>% %<>% %$% %!>% %T>% |> (since 4.1.0)
Function call 1:3 %>% sum() 1:3 |> sum()
  1:3 %>% sum Needs brackets / parentheses
  1:3 %>% `+`(4) Some functions are not supported
Insert on first empty place mtcars %>% lm(formula = mpg ~ disp) mtcars |> lm(formula = mpg ~ disp)
Placeholder . _ (since 4.2.0)
  mtcars %>% lm(mpg ~ disp, data = . ) mtcars |> lm(mpg ~ disp, data = _ )
  mtcars %>% lm(mpg ~ disp, . ) Needs named argument
  1:3 %>% setNames(., .) Can only appear once
  1:3 %>% {sum(sqrt(.))} Nested calls are not allowed
Extraction call mtcars %>% .$cyl
mtcars %>% {.$cyl[[3]]} or
mtcars %$% cyl[[3]]
mtcars |> _$cyl (since 4.3.0)
mtcars |> _$cyl[[3]]

Environment %>% has additional function environment
use:"x" %!>% assign(1)
"x" |> assign(1)
Create Function top6 <- . %>% sort() %>% tail() Not possible
Speed Slower because Overhead of function call Faster because Syntax transformation

Many differences and limitations disappear when using |> in combination with an (anonymous) function:
1 |> (\(.) .)()
-3:3 |> (\(.) sum(2*abs(.) - 3*.^2))()

Have also a look at: How to pipe purely in base R ('base pipe')? and What are the differences and use cases of the five Magrittr Pipes %>%, %<>%, %$%, %!>% and %T>%?.


Needs brackets

library(magrittr)

1:3 |> sum
#Error: The pipe operator requires a function call as RHS

1:3 |> sum()
#[1] 6

1:3 |> approxfun(1:3, 4:6)()
#[1] 4 5 6

1:3 %>% sum
#[1] 6

1:3 %>% sum()
#[1] 6

1:3 %>% approxfun(1:3, 4:6)  #But in this case empty parentheses are needed
#Error in if (is.na(method)) stop("invalid interpolation method") :
1:3 %>% approxfun(1:3, 4:6)()
#[1] 4 5 6

Some functions are not supported, but some still can be called by placing them in brackets, call them via the function ::, use the placeholder, call it in a function or define a link to the function.

1:3 |> `+`(4)
#Error: function '+' not supported in RHS call of a pipe

1:3 |> (`+`)(4)
#[1] 5 6 7

1:3 |> base::`+`(4)
#[1] 5 6 7

1:3 |>  `+`(4, e2 = _)
#[1] 5 6 7

1 |> (`+`)(2) |> (`*`)(3) #(1 + 2) * 3  or `*`(`+`(1, 2), 3) and NOT 1 + 2 * 3
#[1] 9

1:3 |> (\(.) . + 4)()
#[1] 5 6 7

fun <- `+`
1:3 |> fun(4)
#[1] 5 6 7

1:3 %>% `+`(4)
#[1] 5 6 7

Placeholder needs named argument

2 |> setdiff(1:3, _)
#Error: pipe placeholder can only be used as a named argument

2 |> setdiff(1:3, y = _)
#[1] 1 3

2 |> (\(.) setdiff(1:3, .))()
#[1] 1 3

2 %>% setdiff(1:3, .)
#[1] 1 3

2 %>% setdiff(1:3, y = .)
#[1] 1 3

Also for variadic functions with ... (dot-dot-dot) arguments, the placeholder _ needs to be used as a named argument.

"b" |>  paste("a", _, "c")
#Error: pipe placeholder can only be used as a named argument

"b" |>  paste("a", . = _, "c")
#[1] "a b c"

"b" |>  (\(.) paste("a", ., "c"))()
#[1] "a b c"

Placeholder can only appear once

1:3 |> setNames(nm = _)
#1 2 3 
#1 2 3 

1:3 |> setNames(object = _, nm = _)
#Error in setNames(object = "_", nm = "_") : 
#  pipe placeholder may only appear once

1:3 |> (\(.) setNames(., .))()
#1 2 3 
#1 2 3 

1:3 |> list() |> setNames(".") |> with(setNames(., .))
#1 2 3 
#1 2 3 

1:3 |> list(. = _) |> with(setNames(., .))
#1 2 3
#1 2 3

1:3 %>% setNames(object = ., nm = .)
#1 2 3
#1 2 3

1:3 %>% setNames(., .)
#1 2 3 
#1 2 3

Nested calls are not allowed

1:3 |> sum(sqrt(x=_))
#Error in sum(1:3, sqrt(x = "_")) : invalid use of pipe placeholder

1:3 |> (\(.) sum(sqrt(.)))()
#[1] 4.146264

1:3 %>% {sum(sqrt(.))}
#[1] 4.146264

Extraction call
Experimental feature since 4.3.0. The placeholder _ can now also be used in the rhs of a forward pipe |> expression as the first argument in an extraction call, such as _$coef. More generally, it can be used as the head of a chain of extractions, such as _$coef[[2]]*

mtcars |> _$cyl
mtcars |> _[["cyl"]]
mtcars |> _[,"cyl"]
# [1] 6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 4 4 4 4 8 8 8 8 4 4 4 8 6 8 4

mtcars |> _$cyl[[4]]
#[1] 6

mtcars %>% .$cyl
mtcars %>% .[["cyl"]]
mtcars %>% .[,"cyl"]
# [1] 6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 4 4 4 4 8 8 8 8 4 4 4 8 6 8 4

#mtcars %>% .$cyl[4] #gives mtcars[[4]]
mtcars %>% .$cyl %>% .[4]
#[1] 6

No additional Environment

assign("x", 1)
x
#[1] 1

"x" |> assign(2)
x
#[1] 2

"x" |> (\(x) assign(x, 3))()
x
#[1] 2

1:3 |> assign("x", value=_)
x
#[1] 1 2 3

"x" %>% assign(4)
x
#[1] 1 2 3

4 %>% assign("x", .)
x
#[1] 1 2 3

"x" %!>% assign(4) #Use instead the eager pipe
x
#[1] 4

5 %!>% assign("x", .)
x
#[1] 5

Create a Function

top6 <- . %>% sort() %>% tail()
top6(c(1:10,10:1))
#[1]  8  8  9  9 10 10

Other possibilities:
A different pipe operator and different placeholder could be realized with the Bizarro pipe ->.; what is not a pipe (see disadvantages) which is overwriting .

1:3 ->.; sum(.)
#[1] 6

mtcars ->.; .$cyl
# [1] 6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 4 4 4 4 8 8 8 8 4 4 4 8 6 8 4

mtcars ->.; .$cyl[4]
#[1] 6

1:3 ->.; setNames(., .)
#1 2 3 
#1 2 3 

1:3 ->.; sum(sqrt(x=.))
#[1] 4.146264

"x" ->.; assign(., 5)
x
#[1] 5

6 ->.; assign("x", .)
x
#[1] 6

1:3 ->.; . + 4
#[1] 5 6 7

1 ->.; (`+`)(., 2) ->.; (`*`)(., 3)
#[1] 9

1 ->.; .+2 ->.; .*3
#[1] 9

and evaluates different.

x <- data.frame(a=0)
f1 <- \(x) {message("IN 1"); x$b <- 1; message("OUT 1"); x}
f2 <- \(x) {message("IN 2"); x$c <- 2; message("OUT 2"); x}

x ->.; f1(.) ->.; f2(.)
#IN 1
#OUT 1
#IN 2
#OUT 2
#  a b c
#1 0 1 2

x |> f1() |> f2()
#IN 2
#IN 1
#OUT 1
#OUT 2
#  a b c
#1 0 1 2

f2(f1(x))
#IN 2
#IN 1
#OUT 1
#OUT 2
#  a b c
#1 0 1 2

Or define a custom pipe operator which is setting . to the value of the lhs in a new environment and evaluates rhs in it. But here values in the calling environment could not be created or changed.

`:=` <- \(lhs, rhs) eval(substitute(rhs), list(. = lhs))

mtcars := .$cyl[4]
#[1] 6

1:3 := setNames(., .)
#1 2 3 
#1 2 3 

1:3 := sum(sqrt(x=.))
#[1] 4.146264

"x" := assign(., 6)
x
#Error: object 'x' not found

1 := .+2 := .*3
#[1] 9

So another try is assigning lhs to the placeholder . in the calling environment and evaluate the rhs in the calling environment. But here . will be removed from calling environment in case it was already there.

`?` <- \(lhs, rhs) {
  on.exit(if(exists(".", parent.frame())) rm(., envir = parent.frame()))
  assign(".", lhs, envir=parent.frame())
  eval.parent(substitute(rhs))
}

mtcars ? .$cyl[4]
#[1] 6

1:3 ? setNames(., .)
#1 2 3 
#1 2 3 

1:3 ? sum(sqrt(x=.))
#[1] 4.146264

"x" ? assign(., 6)
x
#[1] 6

1 ? .+2 ? .*3
#[1] 9

Another possibility will be to replace all . with lhs so that during evaluation . does not exists anymore as a name.

`%|>%` <- \(lhs, rhs)
  eval.parent(eval(call('substitute', substitute(rhs), list(. = lhs))))

mtcars %|>% .$cyl[4]
[1] 6

1:3 %|>% setNames(., .)
1 2 3 
1 2 3

1:3 %|>% sum(sqrt(x=.))
[1] 4.146264

"x" %|>% assign(., 6)
x
#[1] 6

1 %|>% .+2 %|>% .*3
#[1] 7

The name of the used operator influences the operator precedence: See Same function but using for it the name %>% causes a different result compared when using the name :=.
For more advanced options see: Write own / custom pipe operator.


Speed

library(magrittr)

`:=` <- \(lhs, rhs) eval(substitute(rhs), list(. = lhs))

`?` <- \(lhs, rhs) {
  on.exit(if(exists(".", parent.frame())) rm(., envir = parent.frame()))
  assign(".", lhs, envir=parent.frame())
  eval.parent(substitute(rhs))
}

`%|>%` <- \(lhs, rhs)
  eval.parent(eval(call('substitute', substitute(rhs), list(. = lhs))))


x <- 42
bench::mark(min_time = 0.2, max_iterations = 1e8
, x
, identity(x)
, "|>" = x |> identity()
, "|> _" = x |> identity(x=_)
, "->.;" = {x ->.; identity(.)}
, "|> f()" = x |> (\(y) identity(y))()
, "%>%" = x %>% identity
, ":=" = x := identity(.)
, "list." = x |> list() |> setNames(".") |> with(identity(.))
, "%|>%" = x %|>% identity(.)
, "?" = x ? identity(.)
)

Result

   expression       min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec`   n_itr  n_gc
   <bch:expr>  <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>    <dbl>   <int> <dbl>
 1 x            31.08ns   48.2ns 19741120.        0B     7.46 2646587     1
 2 identity(x) 491.04ns 553.09ns  1750116.        0B    27.0   323575     5
 3 |>          497.91ns 548.08ns  1758553.        0B    27.3   322408     5
 4 |> _        506.87ns 568.92ns  1720374.        0B    26.9   320003     5
 5 ->.;        725.03ns 786.04ns  1238488.        0B    21.2   233864     4
 6 |> f()      972.07ns   1.03µs   929926.        0B    37.8   172288     7
 7 %>%           2.76µs   3.05µs   315448.        0B    37.2    59361     7
 8 :=            3.02µs   3.35µs   288025.        0B    37.0    54561     7
 9 list.         5.19µs   5.89µs   166721.        0B    36.8    31752     7
10 %|>%          6.01µs   6.86µs   143294.        0B    37.0    27076     7
11 ?             30.9µs  32.79µs    30074.        0B    31.3     5768     6
2
  • 3
    Amazingly comprehensive. Note that 1:3 |> list() |> setNames(".") |> with(setNames(., .)) can be written as 1:3 |> list(. = _) |> with(setNames(., .)) or even 1:3 |> setNames(nm = _) Jun 30, 2023 at 9:36
  • Thanks for the variants also using the _ placeholder! Maybe I should change to another function as there is no need to use the placeholder on two places here with setNames.
    – GKi
    Jul 3, 2023 at 6:39
74

In R 4.1, there was no placeholder syntax for the native pipe. Thus, there was no equivalent of the . placeholder of magrittr and thus the following was impossible with |>.

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") %>% grepl("at", .)
#[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

As of R 4.2, the native pipe can use _ as a placeholder but only with named arguments.

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |> grepl("at", x = _)
#[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

The . and magrittr is still more flexible as . can be repeated and appear in expressions.

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") %>% 
  paste(., ., toupper(.)) 
#[1] "dogs dogs DOGS" "cats cats CATS" "rats rats RATS"

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |>
  paste(x = "no", y = _) 
# Error in paste(x = "_", y = "_") : pipe placeholder may only appear once

It is also not clear how to use |> with a function that takes in unnamed variadic arguments (i.e., ...). In this paste() example, we can make up x and y arguments to trick the placeholder in the correct place, but that feels hacky.

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |>
  paste(x = "no", y = _) 
#[1] "no dogs" "no cats" "no rats"

Here are additional ways to work around the place holder limitations-

  1. Write a separate function
find_at = function(x) grepl("at", x)
c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |> find_at()
#[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
  1. Use an anonymous function

    a) Use the "old" syntax

    c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |> {function(x) grepl("at", x)}()
    

    b) Use the new anonymous function syntax

    c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |> {\(x) grepl("at", x)}()
    
  2. Specify the first parameter by name. This relies on the fact that the native pipe pipes into the first unnamed parameter, so if you provide a name for the first parameter it "overflows" into the second (and so on if you specify more than one parameter by name)

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |> grepl(pattern="at")
#> [1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
0
43

The base R pipe |> added in R 4.1.0 "just" does functional composition. I.e. we can see that its use really is just the same as the functional call:

> 1:5 |> sum()             # simple use of |>
[1] 15
> deparse(substitute( 1:5 |> sum() ))
[1] "sum(1:5)"
> 

That has some consequences:

  • it makes it a little faster
  • it makes it a little simpler and more robust
  • it makes it a little more restrictive: sum() here needs the parens for a proper call
  • it limits uses of the 'implicit' data argument

This leads to possible use of => which is currently "available but not active" (for which you need to set the enviornment variable _R_USE_PIPEBIND_, and which may change for R 4.2.0).

(This was first offered as answer to a question duplicating this over here and I just copied it over as suggested.)

Edit: As the follow-up question on 'what is =>' comes up, here is a quick follow-up. Note that this operator is subject to change.

> Sys.setenv("_R_USE_PIPEBIND_"=TRUE)
> mtcars |> subset(cyl == 4) |> d => lm(mpg ~ disp, data = d)

Call:
lm(formula = mpg ~ disp, data = subset(mtcars, cyl == 4))

Coefficients:
(Intercept)         disp  
     40.872       -0.135  

> deparse(substitute(mtcars |> subset(cyl==4) |> d => lm(mpg ~ disp, data = d)))
[1] "lm(mpg ~ disp, data = subset(mtcars, cyl == 4))"
> 

The deparse(substitute(...)) is particularly nice here.

4
  • Implicit data argument is . from magrittr? What do you mean by possible use of =>? would pipebind be like %<>%?
    – qwr
    Jun 3, 2021 at 12:25
  • Yes. There are a few example flying around of using => to assign a data element explicitly to a named variable, say x, and use that in, say, lm(...., data=x). Jun 3, 2021 at 12:29
  • 1
    I'm still not sure what => does but I suppose that is for a separate question.
    – qwr
    Jun 3, 2021 at 12:40
  • Exactly. And it is also temporary. But I'll toss in a quick edit. Jun 3, 2021 at 12:58
35

The native pipe is implemented as a syntax transformation and so 2 |> sqrt() has no discernible overhead compared to sqrt(2), whereas 2 %>% sqrt() comes with a small penalty.

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  sqrt(1), 
  2 |> sqrt(), 
  3 %>% sqrt()
)

# Unit: nanoseconds
#          expr  min     lq    mean median   uq   max neval
#       sqrt(1)  117  126.5  141.66  132.0  139   246   100
#       sqrt(2)  118  129.0  156.16  134.0  145  1792   100
#  3 %>% sqrt() 2695 2762.5 2945.26 2811.5 2855 13736   100

You see how the expression 2 |> sqrt() passed to microbenchmark is parsed as sqrt(2). This can also be seen in

quote(2 |> sqrt())
# sqrt(2)
18

One difference is their placeholder, _ in base R, . in magrittr.


Since R 4.2.0, the base R pipe has a placeholder for piped-in values, _, similar to %>%'s ., but its use is restricted to named arguments, and can only be used once per call.

It is now possible to use a named argument with the placeholder _ in the rhs call to specify where the lhs is to be inserted. The placeholder can only appear once on the rhs.

To reiterate Ronak Shah's example, you can now use _ as a named argument on the right-hand side to refer to the left-hand side of the formula:

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |> 
    grepl("at", x = _)
#[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

but it has to be named:

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |> 
    grepl("at", _)
#Error: pipe placeholder can only be used as a named argument

and cannot appear more than once (to overcome this issue, one can still use the solutions provided by Ronak Shah):

c("dogs", "cats", "rats") |> 
  expand.grid(x = _, y = _)
# Error in expand.grid(x = "_", y = "_") : pipe placeholder may only appear once

While this is possible with magrittr:

library(magrittr)
c("dogs", "cats", "rats") %>% 
  expand.grid(x = ., y = .)
#     x    y
#1 dogs dogs
#2 cats dogs
#3 rats dogs
#4 dogs cats
#5 cats cats
#6 rats cats
#7 dogs rats
#8 cats rats
#9 rats rats
2
  • 4
    Does it make any sense to restrict the use for just once? Do they have a plan to remove this constraint?
    – GitHunter0
    Apr 26, 2022 at 17:40
  • 3
    If I had to guess (I'm not R-core), it's because these operators (|>, etc) rewrite the syntax so that longcalc() |> quux(x = _) into quux(x = longcalc()), and they don't want longcalc() |> quux(x=_, y=) to translate into double the calc with quux(x=longcalc(), y=longcalc()) (where the second is a redundant and double-the-time call). Just a guess, though. @GitHunter0
    – r2evans
    Sep 9, 2022 at 11:38

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