4

I'm building an interpreter with a garbage collector. I want a thread-local nursery region, and a shared older region. I am having trouble setting up the nursery. I have:

const NurserySize : usize = 25000;
#[thread_local]
static mut NurseryMemory : [usize;NurserySize] = [0;NurserySize];
thread_local! {
    static Nursery: AllocableRegion = AllocableRegion::makeLocal(unsafe{&mut NurseryMemory});
}
#[cfg(test)]
mod testMemory {
    use super::*;
    #[test]
    fn test1() {
        Nursery.with(|n| n.allocObject(10));
    }
}

First question is why do I need the unsafe - NurseryMemory is thread local, so access can't be unsafe?

Second question is how can I actually use this? The code is at playground, but it doesn't compile and attempts I've made to fix it seem to make it worse.

2 Answers 2

5

1. Why is unsafe required to get a reference to a mutable ThreadLocal?

The same reason that you need unsafe for a normal mutable static, you would be able to create aliasing mut pointers in safe code. The following incorrectly creates two mutable references to the mutable thread local.

#![feature(thread_local)]

#[thread_local]
static mut SomeValue: Result<&str, usize> = Ok("hello world");

pub fn main() {

let first = unsafe {&mut SomeValue};
let second = unsafe {&mut SomeValue};

  if let Ok(string) = first {
    *second = Err(0); // should invalidate the string reference, but it doesn't 
    println!("{}", string) // as first and second are considered to be disjunct
  } 
  
}

first wouldn't even need to be a mutable reference for this to be a problem.

2. How to fix the code?

You could use a RefCell around the AllocatableRegion to dynamically enforce the borrowing of the inner value.

const NurserySize : usize = 25000;
#[thread_local]
static mut NurseryMemory : [usize;NurserySize] = [0;NurserySize];

thread_local! {
    static Nursery: RefCell<AllocableRegion> = RefCell::new(AllocableRegion::makeLocal(unsafe{&mut NurseryMemory}));
}

#[cfg(test)]
mod testMemory {
    use super::*;
    #[test]
    fn test1() {
        Nursery.with(|n| n.borrow_mut().allocObject(10));
    }
}
2
  • Thanks; solved my problem. I'm beginning to agree that Rust is a better C++ rather than that it is a better C. Perhaps it's simply that I don't fully grok Rust (I've only written a few thousand lines of Rust code versus the 20,000+ lines I've written in C, SML, Java, Smalltalk) but for this application Rust is getting in the way as much as it's helping. Frankly, I'd be done this project if I were doing it in my (very disciplined) C, whereas I'm not 25% of the way yet in Rust.
    – Dave Mason
    Commented May 22, 2021 at 16:34
  • I don't think that your why is actually a why. What is the difference between that and let foo: Foo; let r1: = &mut foo; let r2 = &mut foo;? I don't think there is a good reason for this other than it being a borrow checker limitation that should be addressed at some point.
    – Josu Goñi
    Commented Jul 17, 2022 at 15:46
1

You don't need unsafe to make a mutable thread-local struct in rust. However, Nursery does need to be a RefCell. This is sufficient:

use std::cell::RefCell;

const NURSERY_SIZE: usize = 300;

thread_local! {
    static NURSERY: RefCell<[usize; NURSERY_SIZE]> = RefCell::new([0; NURSERY_SIZE]);
}

#[cfg(test)]
mod test_memory {
    use super::*;
    #[test]
    fn test1() {
        NURSERY.with(|n| n.borrow_mut()[10] = 20);
    }
}

Rust Playground link

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