0

I would like to use a dictionary parDict with keys that contain a dot and find that the update function does not interpret keys with dots, although the dictionary works fine. The dot-notation is due to object-orientation of the set of parameters.

The following example illustrate the "inconsistency".

parDict = {}
parDict['a'] = 1
parDict['b'] = 2
parDict['group1.b'] = 3 

Several updates of parDict can be done in one command which is important for me

parDict.update(a=4, b=4)

But the the following update is NOT recognized

parDict.update(group1.b=4)

and I get: "SyntaxError: expression cannot contain assignment, ..."

However,

parDict['group1.b'] = 4

works fine.

Is here a way to work around this "inconsistency" to use update() even for keys with a dot in the name?

Would be interesting to perhaps understand the wider context why update() does not work here.

1

3 Answers 3

4

First, let's take a look of how update can be called. According to the Python docs (emphasis mine),

update() accepts either another dictionary object or an iterable of key/value pairs (as tuples or other iterables of length two). If keyword arguments are specified, the dictionary is then updated with those key/value pairs: d.update(red=1, blue=2).

But how can keyword arguments be defined? According to the Python docs (emphasis mine),

keyword argument: an argument preceded by an identifier (e.g. name=) in a function call or passed as a value in a dictionary preceded by **.

But what is an identifier? According to the Python docs,

The valid characters for identifiers are the same as in Python 2.x: the uppercase and lowercase letters A through Z, the underscore _ and, except for the first character, the digits 0 through 9.

Oh, ok. So you can have an identifier such as name or a, but you can't have an identifier such as group1.b since there is a dot in it.

Back to the update method, if you have a dictionary key that it's not an identifier, you can use a dictionary to update it:

parDict.update({"group1.b": 4})
4
  • From Python docs I think it is helpful to also read how they specify "keys" under the heading of "Dictionary" and I read: "The keys can be any object with __hash__() and __eq__() methods. Called a hash in Perl." Thus, accepted "keys" is a much wider set than "identifiers". And using update function with tuples, as I do, is limited to use of keys that are identifiers.
    – janpeter
    May 23, 2021 at 19:41
  • You're correct, but be careful to not mix up things since "keyword arguments" and "dictionary keys" are two different concepts in Python. The former refers to what you can use as a named argument to a function. You can't use invalid identifiers ("group1.b", "1st_group") and restricted keywords ("class", "assert"), as noted by the docs. The latter refers to what you can use as a key to a dictionary. In this case, any string can be used as a dictionary key since they are hashable (i.e. contains __hash__ and __eq__ methods), even "group1.b" and "assert".
    – enzo
    May 23, 2021 at 19:56
  • Now, the update method. This method can be used in 3 diferents ways: with 1) another dictionary, where you can define the keys as strings (d.update({'red': 1, 'blue': 2})), 2) tuples, where you can also define the keys as strings (d.update([('red', 1), ('blue', 2)])) and 3) keywords arguments, where you can define the keys as identifiers (d.update(red=1, blue=2)). Since in the first two ways you can use strings, you can use any key you want. The third way only exists to improve readability, but since it uses keyword arguments, you can't use invalid identifiers nor restricted keywords.
    – enzo
    May 23, 2021 at 19:57
  • Back in my example, note that I can't use the third way to update the key "group1.b" since it's an invalid identifier, but I can use the first way with a dictionary and have the same effect. In a nutshell, you can use a dictionary with an invalid identifier as string, but you can't update a key that uses an invalid identifier as a keyword argument. You can take a look at the link @wjandrea posted to understand it better.
    – enzo
    May 23, 2021 at 20:02
1

I can think of following workaround. In this way you can consistently update parDict with a single command.

parDict = {}
parDict['a'] = 1
parDict['b'] = 2
parDict['group1.b'] = 3
parDict.update(a=4, b=4)
print(parDict)
parDict.update({"a":5, "group1.b":7})
print(parDict)

ouptut:

{'a': 4, 'b': 4, 'group1.b': 3}
{'a': 5, 'b': 4, 'group1.b': 7}
0

I am glad for the input I have got on my questions around parDict, although my original neglect of the difference between "keys" and "identifiers" is very basic. The purpose I have in mind is to simplify command-line interaction with an object-oriented parameter structure. It is a problem of some generality and perhaps here are better solutions than what I suggest below?

Using update() with tuples is attractive, more readable and avoid using a few signs as pointed out at the link @wjandrea posted. But to use it this way we need to introduce another dictionary, i.e. we have parDict with short unique parameter names and use identifiers and corresponding values, and then introduce parLocation that is a dictionary that relates the short names parameter names to the location object-oriented string.

The solution

parDict = {}
parDict['a'] = 1
parDict['b'] = 2
parDict['group1_b'] = 3

and

parLocation = {}
parLocation['a'] = 'a'
parLocation['b'] = 'b'
parLocation['group1_b'] = 'group1.b'

For command line-interaction I can now write

parDict.update(b=4, group1_b=4)

And for the internal processing where parameter values are brought to the object-oriented system I write something like

for key in parDict.keys(): set(parLocation[key], parDict[key])

where set() is some function that take as arguments parameter "location" and "value".

Since the problem has some generality I though here might be some other better or more direct approach?

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.