53

Please, consider this code:

System.out.println("#1");
Stream.of(0, 1, 2, 3)
        .peek(e -> System.out.println(e))
        .sorted()
        .findFirst();

System.out.println("\n#2");
IntStream.range(0, 4)
        .peek(e -> System.out.println(e))
        .sorted()
        .findFirst();

The output will be:

#1
0
1
2
3

#2
0

Could anyone explain, why output of two streams are different?

11
  • 12
    Interesting optimisation! I suppose .sorted() on that IntStream just noops because it already knows somehow it's already sorted.
    – sp00m
    Commented May 24, 2021 at 9:28
  • 12
    Generally, whether or not peek will actually observe a given element is unpredictable and implementation-dependent. It's only meant to be helpful for debugging purposes.
    – kaya3
    Commented May 24, 2021 at 9:34
  • 2
    In addition the difference you are asking about and which is answered in the answer, another difference is that Stream.of(0, 1, 2, 3) gives you a Stream<Integer> whereas IntStream.range(0, 4) gives you an IntStream, a stream of int primitives.
    – Anonymous
    Commented May 24, 2021 at 9:52
  • 2
    I'm saying that, but I'm also saying it's an implementation detail whether or not an element is consumed, except for the few stream methods which specify this. It would be within spec for peek to do lots of different things in many common scenarios.
    – kaya3
    Commented May 25, 2021 at 6:08
  • 1
    @sp00m and yet its not able to perform the max or min in O(1) ... IntStream.range(0, 4).peek(System.out::println).max(); // produces 0,1,2,3. Why not use the same optimisation here?
    – Naman
    Commented May 26, 2021 at 2:46

2 Answers 2

51

Well, IntStream.range() returns a sequential ordered IntStream from startInclusive(inclusive) to endExclusive (exclusive) by an incremental step of 1, which means it's already sorted. Since it's already sorted, it makes sense that the following .sorted() intermediate operation does nothing. As a result, peek() is executed on just the first element (since the terminal operation only requires the first element).

On the other hand, the elements passed to Stream.of() are not necessarily sorted (and the of() method doesn't check if they are sorted). Therefore, .sorted() must traverse all the elements in order to produce a sorted stream, which allows the findFirst() terminal operation to return the first element of the sorted stream. As a result, peek is executed on all the elements, even though the terminal operation only needs the first element.

3
  • 2
    2 things: 1. is this a compiler optimization? seems like you imply that. 2. Would be helpful if you elaborate on sorted() making a difference (for peek) by needing all elements... Good answer, btw.
    – ernest_k
    Commented May 24, 2021 at 9:57
  • 4
    @ernest_k 1. After thinking about it more, compiler optimization seems less likely. I think the or at least does nothing part is more likely to be the case. 2. what kind of elaboration do you think is missing? I wrote in the second paragraph why sorted usually needs to traverse all the elements.
    – Eran
    Commented May 24, 2021 at 10:11
  • 4
    @ernest_k it is a runtime optimization only, and a bit fragile too
    – Eugene
    Commented May 24, 2021 at 16:21
33

IntStream.range is already sorted:

// reports true
System.out.println(
       IntStream.range(0, 4)
                .spliterator()
                .hasCharacteristics(Spliterator.SORTED)
);

So when sorted() method on the Stream is hit, internally, it will become a NO-OP.

Otherwise, as you already see in your first example, all the elements have to be sorted, only then findFirst can tell who is "really the first one".

Just notice that this optimization only works for naturally sorted streams. For example:

// prints too much you say?
Stream.of(new User(30), new User(25), new User(34))
            .peek(x -> System.out.println("1 : before I call first sorted"))
            .sorted(Comparator.comparing(User::age))
            .peek(x -> System.out.println("2 : before I call second sorted"))
            .sorted(Comparator.comparing(User::age))
            .findFirst();

where (for brevity):

record User(int age) { }
3
  • 1
    "Just notice that this optimization only works for naturally sorted streams" I suppose that makes sense, the boolean "SORTED" flag only tracks one type of 'sorted', and it'd be really complex to track other types (you'd need something like a Map<Comparator, Boolean> to track them.
    – Alexander
    Commented May 25, 2021 at 13:53
  • Possibly relevant to the implementation detail, but if the characteristics of the stream were deterministic to perform a No-Op, could such optimisation not be used in IntStream.range(0, 4).peek(System.out::println).max(); // outputs 0,1,2,3? On a sorted list, performing a max and min should be O(1) right?
    – Naman
    Commented May 25, 2021 at 17:30
  • @Naman yup, I remember there was a talk about this a few times. It is just not implemented "yet".
    – Eugene
    Commented May 25, 2021 at 17:41

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