0

This question is specifically about C compilers for embedded systems, but I'm sure it can be applied to programming in general.

Is there any benefit to writing multi-step mathematical expressions in one line rather than breaking them up into equivalent individual operations, or vice-versa?

for instance is:

int convert(int in){
  return (int)(((long)in * 727) / 12) + 9;
}

better or worse than:

int convert(int in){
  long out = (long)in;
  out *= 727;
  out /= 12;
  out += 9;
  return (int)out;
}

generally speaking?

My instinct is that one-lined expressions might be easier for the compiler to optimize, but I don't write compilers so I don't know for sure.

2
  • Just look at the machine codes for both and you will find whether any difference is there. May 24, 2021 at 16:03
  • 1
    There are differences in floating-point code. The C standard allows implementations to use extra precision when evaluating expressions, but not in assignments or casts. May 24, 2021 at 18:08

4 Answers 4

6

Compilers perform so well nowadays that it's almost pointless to bother with that kind of micro-optimization. Algorithms should be optimized, not code arrangement. Do what's easier to read and understand for others.

Compiling both codes with GCC (first level of optimization) gives the same assembly output, so they're strictly equivalent : https://godbolt.org/z/91rrc4E69

8
  • The godbolt link is very helpful, but I did notice that the assembly is not strictly equivalent at the -O0 opimization level, and not every compiler in my experience is as smart as gcc May 24, 2021 at 14:38
  • You said in your question "is specifically about C compilers for embedded systems", expect gcc or clang what would you use ? -O2 is to be used in anything serious anyway
    – ShellCode
    May 24, 2021 at 14:40
  • 1
    @ShellCode there are many compilers, almost for each board/cpu vendor, like Synopsis compiler for ARC CPUs, etc...
    – Alex Lop.
    May 24, 2021 at 14:42
  • I've worked with compilers and codebases so old they have to be run in video game emulators. I don't expect anything like that to be smarter than gcc -O0 May 24, 2021 at 14:42
  • Ok I didn't know. I'm more used to vendors providing their own gcc toolchain, but nothing too crazy
    – ShellCode
    May 24, 2021 at 14:44
1

Is there any benefit to writing multi-step mathematical expressions in one line rather than breaking them up into equivalent individual operations, or vice-versa?

Yes. One is that, if you write operations using a character or short type, they will be performed throughout using int arithmetic, allowing larger intermediate results. In contrast, if each intermediate result is assigned to a character or short variable, each intermediate result is reduced to the destination type (in a way that is defined either by the C standard for unsigned types and the implementation for signed types).1 It is most often a benefit to have more “headroom” in intermediate values, but assignments or casts can be useful used for deliberate reductions.

A second is the C standard permits floating-point operations to be performed with more precision than the nominal type. For example, a multiplication of two float operands followed by an addition of another float operand may be performed as if the operands were double or even as if there were infinite precision in the multiplication. In contrast, assignments (and casts) require the value to be converted to the nominal type. This may be a benefit (because it tends to reduce rounding errors) or a detriment (when programming for precise IEEE-754 semantics).

A third is that single expressions generally give the compiler more flexibility to organize the operations. Breaking operations over multiple statements introduces sequence points between them, constraining the compiler’s optimization. As with the others, it can be a benefit to use a single expression to allow compiler optimizations or a benefit to use multiple statements to introduce necessary sequencing.

Judging by the comments and other answers, none of these manifested in examinations of your sample code, but they do exist in general.

Note that all of these affect the semantics: The benefits or detriments are due to effectively telling the compiler whether or not it may use a wider type throughout, whether or not it may use extra precision, and whether or not it must sequence certain things. As far as optimization goes, using one statement or separate statements is not a useful way of helping modern compilers optimize. Good modern compilers analyze program semantics in fairly comprehensive ways, so they are mostly not helped much by such simple restructuring of expressions.

Footnote

1 This answer discusses only the common situation in which int is wider than char and short. While this is typical in modern C implementations, it is not required by the C standard.

1

For the compiler, there is no difference between the two ways.

For the reader trying to understand or a developer debugging the code, though, formulae with important intermediate values are helpful.

13
  • Slight correction. For the compiler without any optimization level, there is a difference. In the second case it will have to allocate and store the intermediate values on the stack. However once an optimization level is applied, the outcome of the generated binary should be the same: godbolt.org/z/WGPjad3W9
    – Alex Lop.
    May 24, 2021 at 14:34
  • 1
    And in this case, the first is much better readable (to me). May 24, 2021 at 14:37
  • Both agreed. As the OP asked for a general answer, I think the assumptions are ok that he uses a modern compiler, doesn't manually lower default optimisation levels and just wanted to illustrate his points with this code. His intermediate values indeed aren't meaningful here. May 24, 2021 at 14:41
  • @AlexLop. the question "what is more efficient" what you do not enable optimizations makes no sense. May 24, 2021 at 14:44
  • @0___________ why not? The OP didn't state which compiler and what optimization level is used. Sometimes it makes sense... for example during development when one has to debug the code but it still requires efficient code in certain areas. The OP specifically tagged this question with "embedded"
    – Alex Lop.
    May 24, 2021 at 14:51
1

If you compile with optimizations enabled there is no difference in the generated code. I prefer step by step as it is less error-prone and easier to understand when you come back to the project after several months.

int convert0(int in){
  return (int)(((long)in * 727) / 12) + 9;
}

int convert1(int in){
  long out = (long)in;
  out *= 727;
  out /= 12;
  out += 9;
  return (int)out;
}

int convert2(int in){
  long out1 = (long)in;
  long out2 = out1 * 727;
  long out3 = out2 / 12;
  long out4 = out3 + 9;
  return (int)out4;
}

The best way is too check it yourself. Simply see the emited assembly code:

https://godbolt.org/z/3cTzaWsGe

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