6

In the following code, I try to store a const reference to another class:

struct A {
};

struct B {
    constexpr B(A const & _a) : a(_a) {}
        
    A const &  a;
};

int main() {
    constexpr A s1;
    constexpr B s2{s1};
}

however, the compiler (gcc 11.1) complains with:

cctest.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
cctest.cpp:12:22: error: ‘B{s1}’ is not a constant expression
   12 |     constexpr B s2{s1};
      |

and I can't work out why s1 is not considered a constant expression. s1 itself is a constexpr in the code. I know this probably has something to do with lifetimes of the references, but I can't work out the logic. In the code that this example came from, I don't want to store a copy of A, I really do just want a reference or (smart) pointer. So:

  1. Why is s1 not a constant expression?
  2. What is the best practice way of handling this?

Many thanks!

1

1 Answer 1

5

Clang 12.0.0+ gives a descriptive note about the issue:

note: address of non-static constexpr variable 's1' may differ on each invocation of the enclosing function; add 'static' to give it a constant address

So you need to add a static here:

struct A {
};

struct B {
    constexpr B(A const & _a) : a(_a) {}
        
    A const &  a;
};

int main() {
    constexpr static A s1;
    constexpr B s2{s1};
}
2
  • since clang 12, earlier version do not contain that information.
    – Marek R
    Commented May 26, 2021 at 11:14
  • @MarekR just checked the v11.0.1 and you're right. Edited to add the version for clarity, thanks :) Commented May 26, 2021 at 11:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.