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After reading this blog post: http://www.sitepoint.com/javascript-shared-web-workers-html5/

I don't get it. What's the difference between a Worker and a SharedWorker?

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5 Answers 5

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Very basic distinction: a Worker can only be accessed from the script that created it, a SharedWorker can be accessed by any script that comes from the same domain.

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  • 6
    Umm, so SharedWorker on a popup via window.open can access others assuming they are on the same origin? What if they are on an entirely new tab, I guess no?
    – Tower
    Jul 21, 2011 at 15:22
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    @Tower "Same origin" has nothing to do with the page that spawned another page. It means (roughly) the domain name from where the script was called. See this chart . So two scripts, both on example.com, can access the same SharedWorker even across different tabs.
    – rvighne
    Jan 30, 2014 at 2:48
  • So, does that mean a regular WebWorker can only have one connection even if the user duplicates their tab running the same script from the same domain? Or is that still considered the same script by the browser? In other words, app.js connects to worker.js, then the user replicates their tab: can tab2 still connect to worker.js? Will worker.js still maintain the same memory pool between tab1's app.js and tab2's app.js. I'm interested because I need to maintain a Queue structure in a background-process / daemon and post events to such daemon from any open tab within the same application.
    – Cody
    Mar 8, 2018 at 23:05
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To anyone considering using SharedWorker -- Apple removed support of SharedWorker from WebKit in 2015. In their current roadmap there is no plan for reimplementation. Support for Service Workers is currently under development for WebKit and offer similar capabilities (see here for comparisons).

You can follow the development (aka Safari support) of ServiceWorkers in WebKit here.

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  • What does this mean? Apple is not supporting sharedworkers?
    – Pacerier
    Apr 8, 2017 at 16:35
  • It means that Apple WebKit removed support of SharedWorkers as of Changeset 178310 and does not plan on reintroducing their support. Oct 9, 2017 at 19:23
  • what? does Apple want to become the new internet explorer? Jul 12, 2018 at 8:05
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    @JohnBalvinArias Apple/Safari has been the new Internet Explorer for quite some time now. :)
    – John Weisz
    Feb 23, 2019 at 11:31
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    Great point! Here is a link that shows the (poor) support for SharedWorker caniuse.com/sharedworkers
    – ymz
    Oct 1, 2020 at 8:19
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SharedWorker's seem to have more functionality then Worker.

Among that functionality is :

  • A shared global scope. All SharedWorker instances share a single global scope.

W3C Spec:

WHATWG Spec:

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  • Does SharedWorker also have more "processing power"?
    – Pacerier
    Aug 18, 2016 at 18:11
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A shared worker can work with multiple connections. It posts messages to ports to allow communication between various scripts.

A dedicated worker on the other hand is simply tied to its main connection and cannot post messages to other scripts (workers).

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  • So, does that mean a regular WebWorker can only have one connection even if the user duplicates their tab running the same script from the same domain? Or is that still considered the same script by the browser? In other words, app.js connects to worker.js, then the user replicates their tab: can tab2 still connect to worker.js? Will worker.js still maintain the same memory pool between tab1's app.js and tab2's app.js. I'm interested because I need to maintain a Queue structure in a background-process / daemon and post events to such daemon from any open tab within the same application.
    – Cody
    Mar 8, 2018 at 23:03
  • I don't understand (although it might be that this answer is almost 8 years old). You can transfer several MessagePort objects to a Worker and wire up whole networks of connections, Workers communicating with other Workers, iframes, Worklets, etc.
    – John Weisz
    Feb 23, 2019 at 11:32
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Shared worker allow all front page context script, which call constructor: new SharedWorker("path-to-shared-worker-file.js") to share the same instance of shared worker file running in the background context(another thread of running javascript in the back).

for example, when webpage #1 calling that constructor, if found there is no shared worker loaded up in the back yet, it will cause the background context to download the file and load it up, then later when webpage #2 calling that same constructor(same file path), it found there is an existing shared worker running, it will just using the same one. When worker.port.start() function invoked, it will cause shared worker file onconnect event handler invoked to register caller and obtain the handle to communicate the client port(for postMessage back for example).

However worker, every webpage above will load up one worker file in the background for every single front page, which is not shared the same worker.js instance.

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