1

I got two structs (Dog and Cat) which implements the same trait Animal.

#![allow(unused)]
pub struct Dog;
pub struct Cat;

trait Animal {
    fn walk();
}

impl Animal for Dog {
    fn walk() { 
        println!("Dog walking.");
    }
}

impl Animal for Cat {
    fn walk() { 
        println!("Cat walking.");
    }
}

Then I have this function, which accepts a generic T type as a parameter. The generic type should implement the trait Animal and execute the method from the specified struct.

fn walk_module<T: Animal>(animal: T) {
    T::walk();
}

I hope to use this like so.

fn main() {
   walk_module(Cat); // prints Cat walking.
}

So everything is good, the animal is walking.

Playground here: https://play.rust-lang.org/?version=stable&mode=debug&edition=2018&gist=7c16dfbf651b0b5871e771e7b64d17fb

However, the issue starts when I try to fetch the structs from an enum.

-- snips --

enum AnimalCategory {
    Dog(Dog),
    Cat(Cat)
}

fn get_the_animal(category: &str) -> AnimalCategory {
    match category {
        "dog" => AnimalCategory::Dog(Dog),
        "cat" => AnimalCategory::Cat(Cat),
        _ => AnimalCategory::Dog(Dog),
    }
}

fn main() {
   // Option 1
   let animal = get_the_animal("dog");
   walk_module(animal); // this errors now because enum AnimalCategory does not implement the Animal trait, and so the animal can't walk
}

I do not want to implement the Animal trait for AnimalCategory, but I know that I could implement methods for the enum AnimalCategory and have it return the correct variant and do exhaustive matching but it seems redundant, and I am not sure if I am doing it correctly.

-- snips --

impl AnimalCategory {
    fn dog(self) -> Dog {
        if let AnimalCategory::Dog(d) = self { d } else { panic!("Not dog!") }
    }

    fn cat(self) -> Cat {
        if let AnimalCategory::Cat(c) = self { c } else { panic!("Not cat!") }
    }
}

-- snips --

fn main() {
   // OPTION 2
   let animal = get_the_animal("dog");

   if let AnimalCategory::Dog(Dog) = animal {
        let dog = animal.dog();
        walk_module(dog);
        cry_module(dog); // this is where the redundancy comes
   } else {
        let cat = animal.cat();
        walk_module(cat);
        cry_module(cat); // this is where the redundancy comes
    }   
}

If I have to implement new methods, then I have to call the function/module twice. I would like to be able to do the OPTION 1 instead, but I could not figure it out.

1 Answer 1

2

I do not want to implement the Animal trait for Animal category

Why?

and I am not sure if I am doing it correctly.

I don't think that is the correct solution no.

As far as I'm concerned, implementing Animal for AnimalCategory sounds like a fine solution. An alternative would be to leverage dynamic dispatch but this requires a few changes:

  • Your trait currently is not object-safe, which means it can not be used for dynamic dispatch. The solution is simple enough: make it operate on instances:

    trait Animal {
        fn walk(&self);
    }
    
    impl Animal for Dog {
        fn walk(&self) { 
            println!("Dog walking.");
        }
    }
    
    impl Animal for Cat {
        fn walk(&self) { 
            println!("Cat walking.");
        }
    }
    

    this does require updating walk_module to work on the instance as well:

    fn walk_module<T: Animal>(animal: T) {
        animal.walk();
    }
    
  • Next you need a cast method: if you have an AnimalCategory you should have a way to get an Animal out of it, without knowing which animal specifically:

    impl AnimalCategory {
        fn as_animal(&self) -> &dyn Animal {
            match self {
                Self::Dog(d) => d,
                Self::Cat(c) => c,
            }
        }
    }
    

    now we can get our animal:

    let animal = get_the_animal("dog");
    walk_module(animal.as_animal());
    
  • however there is still an issue: &dyn Trait does not implement Trait by default, so we need to add one such implementation in order for our &dyn Animal to be an Animal. That's easy enough as we can just delegate to the underlying object (dyn Trait does implement Trait)

    impl Animal for &dyn Animal {
        fn walk(&self) { (*self).walk() }
    }
    

et voilà.

Incidentally in the second example the retrieval methods are completely unnecessary, you can already get the instances from matching the enum:

fn main() {
    let animal = get_the_animal("dog");

    match animal {
        AnimalCategory::Dog(dog) => {
            walk_module(dog);
        }
        AnimalCategory::Cat(cat) => {
            walk_module(cat);
        }
    }
}
4
  • Thanks! This is a significant step for what I am trying to do. Take care.
    – iismaell
    Jun 2, 2021 at 10:08
  • I still don't understand why we have to impl Animal trait to itself. Would you mind explaining why this is necessary?
    – iismaell
    Jun 3, 2021 at 0:55
  • @iismaell you don't have to impl Animal for itself, you have to impl Animal for references to itself. That's because (as the link indicates) it's not done automatically / by default, so if you don't do that trait objects (&dyn Animal) don't implement the trait, and thus can't be used in generic (statically dispatched) functions. This used is not super common so it generally doesn't matter, but in this case... it does.
    – Masklinn
    Jun 3, 2021 at 5:35
  • This actually adds to the redundancy, which is what I am trying to avoid in the first place, but it seems to be more proper and an overall better solution compare to other routes. Thanks again for the solution. Have a nice day.
    – iismaell
    Jun 8, 2021 at 3:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.