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I am brand new to Linux and still trying to understand the basic commands. My instructor just gave us a few exercises to try to finish on our own - one of which was to just create a file called hello.sh and add a few lines of text to it. To do this I wrote the following code into my MobaXterm:

touch hello.sh
echo "Hello $LOGNAME\!" > hello.sh

and then there were a few other echo commands I wanted to add also but immediately after entering this first "echo" command, my terminal says

-bash: hello.sh: cannot overwrite existing file

What is going on here? I did something similar with a .txt file and it seemed to work. Is the issue due to the file type or am I just messing the commands up? (Also, sorry if I used the wrong tags - not exactly sure what was best for this question.)

Thanks for any help!

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  • change hello.sh to something else Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 13:05
  • 1
    echo foo >hello.sh does all these steps -- creates a file, writes a line to it, and closes it. Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 13:07
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    That said, "cannot overwrite existing file" unless you've configured your shell with some non-default flags implies that that file is already being executed, and that you're on an operating system that doesn't allow files that are being executed to be modified at the same time. Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 13:08
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    In general, best practice is to create a new file and write to that, and rename it over the old one when you're done when you want to change a potentially-running executable. Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 13:09
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    BTW, if you want to write multiple lines to a file between creating it and closing it, create a code block. { echo "first line"; echo "second line"; echo "third line"; } >hello.sh only opens once before all three echos, and closes when they're all done. Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 13:11

2 Answers 2

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I frequently use the noclobber option in my scripts. It changes the default behavior of >, which usually truncates files that already exist, to do what you are seeing. It will still create a new file, but won't destroy existing content.

To add to an existing file, use >>. If you want to truncate a file with pre-existing content, use >|. These always work, even if noclobber is set. Both will also create a new file if one does not already exist.

touch created an empty file, so noclobber won't let you write to it since it already exists.

$: ls foo                     # no such file exists
ls: cannot access 'foo': No such file or directory
$: echo hello > foo           # create it and add content
$: ls -l foo                  
-rw-r--r-- 1 P2759474 1049089 6 Jun  3 08:14 foo
$: cat foo
hello

$: echo world > foo           # TRUNCATES and adds new content
$: ls -l foo
-rw-r--r-- 1 P2759474 1049089 6 Jun  3 08:14 foo
$: cat foo
world

$: rm foo                     
$: ls foo
ls: cannot access 'foo': No such file or directory
$: set -o noclobber           # set > as nondestructive
$:  echo hello > foo          # still creates new file
$: ls -l foo
-rw-r--r-- 1 P2759474 1049089 6 Jun  3 08:15 foo
$: cat foo
hello

$: echo world > foo           # now will not destroy existing data
bash: foo: cannot overwrite existing file
$: echo world >> foo          # but >> appends
$: ls -l foo
-rw-r--r-- 1 P2759474 1049089 12 Jun  3 08:15 foo
$: cat foo
hello
world

$: echo gone >| foo           # *explicitly* truncate and add new data
$: ls -l foo
-rw-r--r-- 1 P2759474 1049089 5 Jun  3 08:16 foo
$: cat foo
gone
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    c.f. mywiki.wooledge.org/NoClobber and all the other BashFAQ goodness. Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 13:30
  • I use noclobber in my interactive shells, but not in scripts. Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 13:31
  • I definitely use it in scripts where the behavior matters, and use >| if I mean to overwrite any file that might exist. Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 13:33
  • Like the >| a forgotten trick... got a +
    – fcm
    Commented Jan 11, 2023 at 16:20
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"Cannot overwrite existing file" implies that set -o noclobber has been run in your shell.

To disable it, run set +o noclobber.

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