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I'm building an express api with node.js. I'd like to send an email after a user creates an account. I've tried a couple of ways of doing that, but they don't seem to fit my needs, here's some pseudo code:

1. Pass the function that sends the email "at the end" of the route. Basically, just call the function that sends the email at the end of the route that creates the user account:

app.post("/users", (req, res) => {
  const { email, password } = req.body;
  // create user...
  sendEmailTo(email);
}

My concern with this approach is that the /POST users route is now no longer only for creating a user, but every time it creates one it also sends an email, which may be bad for future use cases where we'd like to create a user separately from the user signup form.

2. Have a unique route specifically for sending emails. In this case, we'd have to make two request to the api, one for creating a user, and another one for sending the email:

app.post("/send", (req, res) => {
  const { recipientEmail } = req.body;
  sendEmailTo(recipientEmail);
}

What I don't like about this approach is that my api is not an "email" api, I'd like to leave it free for all users to explore and use, I don't want users to just be able to send emails in behalf of the api by requesting this route.

I'm sure there must be other ways of doing this like using some type of callbacks or queues, yet I have found nothing researching for hours, everything is basically a rehearsal of the two options above. Taking into account the need for separation of concerns, how would you go on about sending an email after a request? do I only have these two options?

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  • If you're really bothered with the monolithic route handler, you could always split it in multiple fined-grained reusable middlewares that would all get executed in the same request-response cycle.
    – IAmDranged
    Jun 4 '21 at 19:08
  • @IAmDranged What bothers me with the monolithic route is the fact that I don't know if there's a good way to secure it so to leave all my other routes accessible but this one only accessible to my frontend (or to a specific source)
    – Jorche
    Jun 4 '21 at 19:14
  • I'm not sure to understand what you mean. I ddin't realize there was a security issue invovled. Is this something I missed from your post, or is this another concern that you are expressing here? If so, maybe elaborate a bit in on it in your post? Or if I missed something please just clarify for me.
    – IAmDranged
    Jun 4 '21 at 19:20
  • @IAmDranged Sure. In my post I mentioned that I'd like my api routes to be accessible to all users, however, if I end up adding a route whose purpose is sending an email, this is not something I'd want my users to be able to access freely via an api request, this email route should then only be accessible to specific sources e.g the frontend. So what I'm wondering now is if there's any way I could protect the route that sends an email to be accessible only to the frontend, while all other routes can continue to be requested by everyone
    – Jorche
    Jun 4 '21 at 19:34
  • 1
    I don't think adding an extra route alltogether for sending emails is a good option anyway. If you want to split the route logic, like I said, you could just have multiple middlewares - createUser, sendEmail in this case - that you would register for your /users route. These middlewares also would be reusable across your all of your other routes - if that is desirable. Makes sense?
    – IAmDranged
    Jun 4 '21 at 19:48
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As I mentioned in the comments, you could just split your route handler in more fine-grained middlewares that would be reusable across all of your routes.

A route-level middleware is very similar to a route handler, except for the fact that instead of producing a response, it actually just does some more focused job and then forwards the request currently being processed to the next middleware or route handler in line. It does this with the extra next function parameter that is injected by express.

In your scenario, you could do something like this:

app.post(
  "/users", 
  createUser,
  sendEmail,
  send201Response
)

async function createUser(req, res, next) {
  // Create user...
  ​next();
}
​async function sendEmail(req, res, next) {
  // Send email...
  ​next();
​}
function send201Response(req, res) {
  ​res.sendStatus(201);
}

Then if another use case happens to involve creating a user in a similar way for instance, you could do:

app.post(
  "/otherendpoint", 
  createUser,
  // Add other middleware/route handlers...
)
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  • From your example, how would you specify in a request that you'd like to skip the sendEmail middleware? (I'll need to skip the email in some cases)
    – Jorche
    Jun 4 '21 at 21:09
  • Just plug in the middleware that you want to reuse for your new endpoint - I have added an example above.
    – IAmDranged
    Jun 4 '21 at 21:14
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If you are concerned with people using the "/send" route, then you probably want the first option. In the future if you want to create a user but not send an email, then you can just add conditionals to not send the email in certain cases. For example, you could add another property to the body in order to determine if the email should be sent.

app.post("/users", (req, res) => {
  const { email, password, sendEmail } = req.body;
  // create user...
  if(sendEmail === true) sendEmailTo(email);
}

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