-1

In this challenge, using javaScript you will create 3 classes

  1. Super class called Animal.
  2. Dog and Cat class which both extends Animal class (a dog is an animal and a cat is an animal)
  3. Dog and Cat class should only have 1 function, which is their own implementation of the sound() function. This is polymorphism
  4. a Home class. But we’ll talk about that later
// Javascript

var dog = new Dog();

dog.eat(); // -> 'Rax eat'
dog.sounds();// -> 'Dog barks'

var cat = new Cat();

cat.eat();// -> 'Stormy eats'
cat.sounds();// -> 'Cat meows'

Now let’s add composition. Make a new class called Home. Lots of people have dogs and cats in their homes. Home should have a function called adoptPet that takes any Animal as an input. The new pet should be stored in the Home object in an array/list. The Home object should also have a function called makeAllSounds. It should work like this:

// Javascript

var home = new Home();
var dog1 = new Dog();
var dog2 = new Dog();
var cat = new Cat();


home.makeAllSounds();// this doesn't give/return any result/data
home.adoptPet(dog1);
home.makeAllSounds();
// this prints :
// Dog barks

home.adoptPet(cat);
home.makeAllSounds();
// this prints :
// Dog barks
// Cat meows

home.adoptPet(dog2);
home.makeAllSounds();
// this prints :
// Dog barks
// Cat meows
//Dog barks

Add some functionality to adoptPet so that an error/exception gets raised if you try to adopt the same pet twice

eg:

home.adoptPet(dog1) // totally ok
home.adoptPet(dog1) // not ok at all

End of the question. That is the question above.

Now this is my own code written below to solve the problem but not working and i don't get how to finish the code.

function Animal () { }
Animal.prototype.eat = function() {
 return "Rax eat";
};

function Dog() { }
Dog.prototype = Object.create(Animal.prototype);
Dog.prototype.constructure = Dog;
Dog.prototype.sound = function() {
    return "Dog barks";
}
let dog = Object.create(Dog.prototype);
let dog1 = Object.create(Dog.prototype);
let dog2 = Object.create(Dog.prototype);

function Cat() { }
Cat.prototype = Object.create(Animal.prototype);
Cat.prototype.constructor = Cat;
Cat.prototype.sound = function() {
    return "Cat meows";
};
let cat = Object.create(Cat.prototype);
console.log (dog.sound()) 
console.log (cat.sound()) 

function Home() { }
Home.prototype = {
    constructor: Home,
    adoptPet: ["cat", "dog", "dog1", "dog2"]
} 
4
  • 2
    In these times (since 2015), you should really consider using the class syntax....
    – trincot
    Jun 5, 2021 at 13:38
  • 1
    What exactly is your problem with that code? Does your browser show any errors? And what is the line Dog.prototype.constructure = Dog; supposed to do? Even if you spell constructor correctly, I see no point in doing this. Finally, why don't you write let dog = new Dog(); etc.?
    – Iziminza
    Jun 5, 2021 at 13:40
  • i felt that line will assign the Dog's prototype the new instances of Dog. Jun 5, 2021 at 13:46
  • i am new to OOP, but trying to improve. i want to complete the code accoding to the instruction in the question. Jun 5, 2021 at 13:49

2 Answers 2

2

Since 2015 there should be no more need to go through the pain of assigning prototype properties like that, and establish inheritance between two classes with such assignments.

I would suggest rewriting your code completely, and using the class syntax, where you don't need to explicitly do this inheritance fiddling with the prototype property:

class Animal {
  eat() {
    return "Rax eat";
  }
}

class Dog extends Animal {
  sound() {
    return "Dog barks";
  }
}

class Cat extends Animal {
  sound() {
    return "Cat meows";
  }
}

class Home {
  constructor() {
    this.pets = []; // Could be a `new Set` for better efficiency
  }
  adoptPet(animal) {
    if (this.pets.includes(animal)) {
      throw new Error("Cannot adopt the same pet twice");
    }
    this.pets.push(animal);
  }
  makeAllSounds() {
    for (let pet of this.pets) {
      console.log(pet.sound());
    }
  }
}

var home = new Home();
var dog1 = new Dog();
var dog2 = new Dog();
var cat = new Cat();

home.makeAllSounds(); // this doesn't give/return any result/data
console.log("== Adding dog ==");
home.adoptPet(dog1);
home.makeAllSounds(); // this prints: Dog barks
console.log("== Adding cat ==");
home.adoptPet(cat);
home.makeAllSounds(); // this prints : Dog barks / Cat meows
console.log("== Adding dog ==");
home.adoptPet(dog2);
home.makeAllSounds(); // ...
home.adoptPet(dog1) // not ok!

0
0

A bad practice is use the reference of class for know if its the same animal, use some identifier field for know if its same animal or not, why ?

Thats because u can have same fields of another object but the references are different.

//Custom exceptions:

class BaseException extends Error{

    constructor (message = "", fileName, lineNumber){
        
        super(message, fileName, lineNumber);
        
        this.name = "BaseException";
        
        if (Error.captureStackTrace) {
            Error.captureStackTrace(this, BaseException);
        }
    }
}

class ThePetExistsException extends BaseException{
    
    constructor (pet ,fileName, lineNumber){
        
        if(pet instanceof Animal){
            
            super("The pet with id: " + pet.animalID + " exists.", fileName, lineNumber);
        }
        
        this.name = "ThePetExistsException";
    }
}


//Closure
let counter = (function (){
    
    let counter = 0;
    
    return (function (){
        return ++counter;
    })
    
})();

class Animal{
    
    constructor(){
        
        this.animalID = counter();
        
    }
    
}


class Cat extends Animal{
    
    constructor(){
        
        super();
        
    }
    
    
    sound(){
        
        return 'Cat meows';
        
    }
    
}

class Dog extends Animal{
    
    constructor(){
        
        super();
        
    }
    
    sound(){
        
        return 'Dog barks';
    }
    
}

class Home{
    
    constructor(){
        
        this.pets = new Array();
        
    }
    
    
    adoptPet(animal){
        
        if(animal instanceof Animal && this.pets.findIndex(function(element){
            
            if(element.animalID == animal.animalID){
                
                return true;
                
            }
            
        }) == -1){
            
            this.pets.push(animal);
            
        }else{
            
            throw new ThePetExistsException(animal);
        }
        
    }
    
    makeAllSounds(){
        
        this.pets.forEach(function(element){
            
            console.log(element.sound());
            
        });
        
    }
    
}

//Instancing classes an checking.

let dog = new Dog();
let cat = new Cat();

let home = new Home();

try{
    
    home.adoptPet(dog);
    home.adoptPet(dog); //Error

    home.adoptPet(cat);

    home.makeAllSounds();

}catch(e){
    
    if(e instanceof ThePetExistsException){
        
        //Handle exception..
        
        console.log("Handle exception ThePetExistsException");
        
        home.adoptPet(cat);
        
        home.adoptPet(new Dog());
        home.adoptPet(new Cat());
        
        home.adoptPet(new Dog());
        home.adoptPet(new Cat());
        
        home.adoptPet(new Dog());
        home.adoptPet(new Cat());

        home.makeAllSounds();
        
    }
    
}

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