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When i call my funtion with a startingAngle=0 it produce a good shape with the correct size. Example:

var points = GetPolygonVertices(sides:4, radius:5, center:(5, 5), startingAngle:0), produces:
points[0] = {X = 10 Y = 5}
points[1] = {X = 5 Y = 0}
points[2] = {X = 0 Y = 5}
points[3] = {X = 5 Y = 10}

As observed the side length is 10px, which is correct, but produce a rotated square at 45º from human eye prespective.

To fix this i added a switch/case to offset the startAngle so it will put the square at correct angle for human eye, by rotating 45º. The rotation works, but the shape is no longer a square of 10x10px, instead i lose 1 to 2px from sides:

[0] = {X = 9 Y = 1}
[1] = {X = 1 Y = 1}
[2] = {X = 1 Y = 9}
[3] = {X = 9 Y = 9}

and become worse as radius grow, for example with radius=10:

[0] = {X = 17 Y = 3}
[1] = {X = 3 Y = 3}
[2] = {X = 3 Y = 17}
[3] = {X = 17 Y = 17}

I tried with both floor and ceil instead of round, but it always end in lose 1 or 2px... Is there a way to improve the function to keep the shape size equal no matter the number of sides and rotation angle?

My function:

    public static Point[] GetPolygonVertices(int sides, int radius, Point center, double startingAngle = 0)
    {
        if (sides < 3)
            throw new ArgumentException("Polygons can't have less than 3 sides...", nameof(sides));


        // Fix rotation
        switch (sides)
        {
            case 3:
                startingAngle += 90;
                break;
            case 4:
                startingAngle += 45;
                break;
            case 5:
                startingAngle += 22.5;
                break;
        }

        var points = new Point[sides];
        var step = 360.0 / sides;
        int i = 0;
        for (var angle = startingAngle; angle < startingAngle + 360.0; angle += step) //go in a circle
        {
            if (i == sides) break; // Fix floating problem
            double radians = angle * Math.PI / 180.0;
            points[i++] = new(
                (int) Math.Round(Math.Cos(radians) * radius + center.X),
                (int) Math.Round(Math.Sin(-radians) * radius + center.Y)
            );
        }
        return points;
    }

EDIT: I updated the function to get rid of the switch condition and product shapes in correct orientation for human eye when angle is not given. Still it suffer from same "problem"

public static Point[] GetPolygonVertices(int sides, int radius, Point center, double startingAngle = 0, bool flipHorizontally = false, bool flipVertically = false)
{
    if (sides < 3)
        throw new ArgumentException("Polygons can't have less than 3 sides...", nameof(sides));

    var vertices = new Point[sides];

    double deg = 360.0 / sides;//calculate the rotation angle
    var rad = Math.PI / 180.0;

    var x0 = center.X + radius * Math.Cos(-(((180 - deg) / 2) + startingAngle) * rad);
    var y0 = center.Y - radius * Math.Sin(-(((180 - deg) / 2) + startingAngle) * rad);

    var x1 = center.X + radius * Math.Cos(-(((180 - deg) / 2) + deg + startingAngle) * rad);
    var y1 = center.Y - radius * Math.Sin(-(((180 - deg) / 2) + deg + startingAngle) * rad);

    vertices[0] = new(
        (int) Math.Round(x0),
        (int) Math.Round(y0)
        );

    vertices[1] = new(
        (int) Math.Round(x1),
        (int) Math.Round(y1)
        );

    for (int i = 0; i < sides - 2; i++)
    {
        double dsinrot = Math.Sin((deg * (i + 1)) * rad);
        double dcosrot = Math.Cos((deg * (i + 1)) * rad);

        vertices[i + 2] = new(
                (int)Math.Round(center.X + dcosrot * (x1 - center.X) - dsinrot * (y1 - center.Y)),
                (int)Math.Round(center.Y + dsinrot * (x1 - center.X) + dcosrot * (y1 - center.Y))
        );
    }

    if (flipHorizontally)
    {
        var startX = center.X - radius;
        var endX = center.X + radius;
        for (int i = 0; i < sides; i++)
        {
            vertices[i].X = endX - (vertices[i].X - startX);
        }
    }

    if (flipVertically)
    {
        var startY = center.Y - radius;
        var endY = center.Y + radius;
        for (int i = 0; i < sides; i++)
        {
            vertices[i].Y = endY - (vertices[i].Y - startY);
        }
    }

    return vertices;
}

EDIT 2: From Tim Roberts anwser here the functions to calculate side length from radius and radius from side length, this solve my problem. Thanks!

public static double CalculatePolygonSideLengthFromRadius(double radius, int sides)
{
    return 2 * radius * Math.Sin(Math.PI / sides);
}

public static double CalculatePolygonVerticalLengthFromRadius(double radius, int sides)
{
    return radius * Math.Cos(Math.PI / sides);
}

public static double CalculatePolygonRadiusFromSideLength(double length, int sides)
{
    var theta = 360.0 / sides;
    return length / (2 * Math.Cos((90 - theta / 2) * Math.PI / 180.0));
}
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  • I think the question would be improved if you stated that the actual goal is to produce a circle with a specified parameters.
    – JonasH
    Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 6:56

1 Answer 1

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Your problem is one of mathematics. You said "As observed, the side length is 10px". It very definitely is not 10px. The distance from (10,5) to (5,0) is sqrt(5*5 + 5*5), which is 7.07. That's exactly what we expect for a square that is inscribed in a circle of radius 5: 5 x sqrt(2).

And that's what the other squares are as well.

FOLLOWUP

As an added bonus, here is a function that returns the radius of the circle that circumscribes a regular polygon with N sides of length L:

import math

def rad(length,nsides):
    theta = 360/nsides
    r = length / (2 * math.cos( (90-theta/2) * math.pi / 180))
    return r

for s in range(3,9):
    print(s, rad(10,s))
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  • Sorry my math skills are lacking. Yes you are right, when i said 10px i mean the canvas size that contain the shape. The function is obvious doing it work, but is there any way to counter this and have the exactly length of 10x10? I updated the code with a new function which solves the initial rotation but same "problem" still applies... Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 20:20
  • It's not 10px, it never was 10px, and it will never be 10px! Draw a circle on paper. Inscribe a square in that circle. If the radius of the circle is 5, then the long diagonal of the square is 10, but the sides are clearly shorter than the long diagonal. They are, in fact, exactly 10xsqrt(2)/2 units, which is 7.07. It doesn't matter how you rotate it, the sides of your square will be 7.07 pixels. That's geometry. You'll have to complain to Euclid or Pythagoreas. Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 20:51
  • I understand what you explained, but i'm asking if is possible to counter this by some math, for example, auto increase the radius by a factor to get the sides up to the desired result of 10 given the initial radius? Currently as it is with a radius of 10 are producing 9x9 squares, it should be 7x7 by your calculations but this is maybe because of the render engine who translate points to filled paths, i tried another image engine which produced 8x8 square using same points vector, so it is adding 1 or 2 pixels depending on the engine/rounding, but that not important here... Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 23:48
  • ...Is there a formula i can use to factorize the radius to produce the sides exactly to the user input? Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 23:49
  • Your function specifically mentions radius, and that's what you are providing. Are you sure that's not what you want? If you want a square with 10px sides, that would make the radius 5 x sqrt(2), which we already know is 7.07. A hexagon with 10px sides needs a radius of 10. Commented Jun 9, 2021 at 0:30

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