5

I'm trying to filter lines for a big txt file (around 10GB) bashed on prefix of called number only when the direction column equals 2.

This is the format of the file that i'm getting from pipe (from a different script)

caller_number=34234234324, clear_number=982545345435, direction=1, ...
caller_number=83479234234, clear_number=348347384533, direction=2, ...

Of cause this is just an example data but the actual file contains many other columns but I want to only filter the clear_number column based on direction so this is enough.

I want to remove lines that do not contain a list of prefixes, so for example here I would do that with grep with the following:

grep -vP 'clear_number=(?!(2207891|22034418|22074450|220201677|220240574|220272183|220722988|220723276|220751152|220774457|220794227|220799141|2202000425|2202000939|2202000967)).*direction=2'

This works beautifully. The only problem is that the number of prefixes that I get is sometimes around 10K-50K, this is a lot of prefixes, and if I try to do that using grep I get grep: regular expression is too large.

Any ideas how else to resolve it using Bash commands?

update

example.. lets say i have the following:

caller_number=34234234324,     clear_number=982545345435, direction=1
caller_number=83479234234,     clear_number=348347384533, direction=2
caller_number=2342334324,      clear_number=5555345435,   direction=1
caller_number=034082394234324, clear_number=33335345435,  direction=1
caller_number=83479234234,     clear_number=348347384533, direction=2
caller_number=83479234234,     clear_number=444447384533, direction=2
caller_number=83479234234,     clear_number=64237384533, direction=2

and my list.txt contains:

642
3333
534234235

so it will only return the line

caller_number=83479234234,     clear_number=64237384533, direction=2

since clear number starts with 642 and direction=2. just in my case it will go over 10GB of text file and return at least 100K of results.

another update

i'm sorry i wasn't clear about one more thing. i get the lines from a pipe command, so i should do | awk... on the output i receive form previous commands.

5
  • 1
    could you clarify your use of the term 'prefix'? assume the line contains clear_number=1234567890, would a matching prefix be 12345 or would the matching prefix need to be 1234567890? tripleee's answer addresses the former (12345) while Wiktor's (current) answer addresses the latter (ie, 'prefix' must be an exact match for 1234567890)
    – markp-fuso
    Jun 8 at 12:54
  • 1
    @markp-fuso - oh nice observation. yeah prefix means prefix means it starts with that number, it's not the full number. i'll send him a comment.
    – ufk
    Jun 8 at 12:56
  • @ufk, could you please do add list.txt in your question too so that we get better understanding of question, thank you. Jun 8 at 13:19
  • @RavinderSingh13 - updated main post.
    – ufk
    Jun 8 at 13:24
  • 1
    here's a sed-based answer with a couple ideas that may work, too
    – markp-fuso
    Jun 8 at 13:24
7

With your shown samples, please try following. Since OP has changed samples so adding code as per that now.

awk '
FNR==NR{
  arr[$0]
  next
}
match($0,/clear_number=[^,]*/){
  val=substr($0,RSTART+13,RLENGTH-13)
  for(i in arr){
    if(index(val,i)==1 && $NF=="direction=2,"){
      print
      next
    }
  }
}
' list.txt  Input_file

Explanation: Adding detailed explanation for above.

awk '                  ##Starting awk program from here.
FNR==NR{               ##Checking condition if FNR==NR which will be TRUE when list.txt is being read.
  arr[$0]              ##Creating arr array with index of current line.
  next                 ##next will skip all further statements from here.
}
match($0,/clear_number=[^,]*/){  ##Using match to match regex for clear_match till 1st occurrence of comma here.
  val=substr($0,RSTART+13,RLENGTH-13)  ##Creating val which has substring of matched regex.
  for(i in arr){       ##Traversing through arr here.
    if(index(val,i)==1 && $NF=="direction=2,"){ ##Checking condition of index AND last field is direction=2 then do following.
      print            ##Printing current line here.
      next             ##next will skip all further statements from here.
    }
  }
}
' list.txt  Input_file ##Mentioning Input_file names here.
7
  • 1
    SO outage is happening in between, so I will try to add explanation as soon as I get complete page loaded not sure this comments gets posted or not. Jun 8 at 13:12
  • hi. your example works, two things missing, you don't address 'direction=2' and i get the data from a pipe not from a static file.
    – ufk
    Jun 8 at 13:42
  • 1
    @ufk, so list file is data which you are getting from another program? since you have mentioned you have huge size files, I would suggest you can create a output file(list file) from your first command and then run this awk command separately to avoid performance issues(since I are not sure what that program is doing). Jun 8 at 13:49
  • 1
    @ufk, actually my original code was to use sub(substitution to remove everything till =); which I edited as per fellow awk contributor's advise, doing substr($0,RSTART+13,RLENGTH-13) will do the same-thing, basically, removing all the unnecessary stuff from value clear_number=982545345435, this will remove clear_number of it. Basically it means remove first 13 characters from matched value by regex. Let me know in case of any queries here, cheers. Jun 8 at 14:40
  • 1
    $NF=="direction=2" needs to be $NF=="direction=2," besides that everything works. thanks
    – ufk
    Jun 8 at 14:55
7

You may try this awk also:

your_command |
awk '
FNR == NR {
   rexp["=" $1]
   next
}
$3 == "direction=2" {
   for (s in rexp)
      if (index($2, s)) {
         print
         next
      }
}' list.txt -

caller_number=83479234234,     clear_number=64237384533, direction=2
1
  • 1
    Using index($2, s) is much much faster than $2 ~ s when I tested
    – Sundeep
    Jun 10 at 10:45
6

You can use awk to read in the prefixes and filter out lines using

... | awk -F'[,=[:space:]]+' 'FNR==NR {hash[$0]; next} $6 == 2 {for (key in hash) { if (index($4, key) == 1) { print; next } }}' list.txt - > outputfile

The [,=[:space:]]+ is the field delimiter regex that matches one or more commas, equal signs and whitespace chars.

The FNR==NR {hash[$0]; next} parts reads in the contents of list.txt with prefixes, each on a separate line.

The $6 == 2 requires Field 6 (direction) to be equal to 2.

Then, {for (key in hash) { if (index($4, key) == 1) { print; next } }}' tries to find a hash value that is a prefix of current Field 4 and prints the line if found and proceeds to the next line.

9
  • 2
    This works, but be careful, this expects that direction=2 is always in the third field.
    – kvantour
    Jun 8 at 11:53
  • 1
    @kvantour That is a good observation, that should speed it up more. Jun 8 at 11:58
  • @markp-fuso mentioned something that is correct. it's not a full match it's a a prefix match, means number starts with the numbers on the list
    – ufk
    Jun 8 at 12:57
  • @ufk It is easy to fix. Jun 8 at 13:00
  • 1
    @WiktorStribiżew - if you can show what you changed to allow prefix and not full match it would be great. trying to understand you solution and not just copy/paste it.
    – ufk
    Jun 8 at 13:01
3

Closer to what you were originally doing -
(To be clear, this approach is probably not the best for such large datasets, but someone with smaller files might benefit.)

edit your list.txt to be patterns instead of just prefix strings.
If I use

clear_number=123.*direction=2
clear_number=03408.*direction=2
clear_number=4567890.*direction=2

and

caller_number=34234234321,     clear_number=982545345435, direction=1
caller_number=83479234232,     clear_number=123347384533, direction=2
caller_number=2342334323,      clear_number=5555345435,   direction=1
caller_number=834792394234324, clear_number=03408345435,  direction=1
caller_number=56779234235,     clear_number=348347384533, direction=2
caller_number=83479234236,     clear_number=456789084533, direction=2
caller_number=83479234237,     clear_number=64237384533,  direction=2

Then I get this:

$: grep -f list.txt x
caller_number=83479234232,     clear_number=123347384533, direction=2
caller_number=83479234236,     clear_number=456789084533, direction=2

So reversing the match -

$: grep -vf list.txt x
caller_number=34234234321,     clear_number=982545345435, direction=1
caller_number=2342334323,      clear_number=5555345435,   direction=1
caller_number=834792394234324, clear_number=03408345435,  direction=1
caller_number=56779234235,     clear_number=348347384533, direction=2
caller_number=83479234237,     clear_number=64237384533,  direction=2

Converting list.txt from

642
3333
534234235

to

clear_number=642.*direction=2
clear_number=3333.*direction=2
clear_number=534234235.*direction=2

only takes

$: sed -i.bak 's/^/clear_number=/; s/$/.*direction=2/;' list.txt

which will make a backup, too.

6
  • that's actually beautiful :) gonna try that too
    – ufk
    Jun 8 at 14:02
  • It might not be as fast, which can matter on really big files, but it's pretty easy to understand. Jun 8 at 14:03
  • ah for some reason i thought it would be faster. anyone thanks a lot for showing me that this is possible. i got a lot of new information today from my question :)
    – ufk
    Jun 8 at 14:04
  • 2
    considering OP mentioned around 10K-50K, this would not be a good solution
    – Sundeep
    Jun 8 at 14:04
  • 1
    Yeah, grep is pretty optimized, but for a situation this specific it's likely to take a long time looping over every record. Jun 8 at 14:09
3

Here's a much faster solution by changing how the inner loop works. This also uses code from RavinderSingh13 and Wiktor Stribiżew answers.

FNR==NR{ arr[$0]; next }

$3=="direction=2,"{
    val=substr($2,14)
    for(i=1; i<length(val); i++)
        if(substr(val,1,i) in arr){
            print
            next
        }
}
  • The inner loop goes over the digits of clear_number instead of looping over every key in arr. So, instead of looping 10K-50K times, you loop only upto length of the digits, which is about 12 max as per given samples.
    • First time, this loop will have one character from start, next time it will have two characters from the start and so on.
    • i<length(val) is used instead of i<=length(val) since the last character will be ,.
  • $3=="direction=2," is compared first (this saves all the looping if not matched)
  • match($0,/clear_number=[^,]*/) isn't needed because $2 already has this string

Save the above code as script.awk and use it as:

... | mawk -f script.awk list.txt

Note that I've also used mawk in the above code. This version of awk is less featured compared to say GNU awk but gives better performance. I checked the results with version 1.3.4 and it gave same result as GNU awk.

If you don't have mawk, then you can use LC_ALL=C awk instead of mawk in the above command. See What does LC_ALL=C do? for details.


Here's a sample timing result (using mawk):

$ wc data.txt
500000  1500000 36000000 data.txt
$ wc list.txt
12000 12000 73382 list.txt
  • 0m57.477s --> anubhava's solution, but with index($2,s) instead of $2 ~ s
  • 0m59.975s --> RavinderSingh13's solution, but with $NF=="direction=2," compared first
  • 1m1.578s --> Wiktor Stribiżew's solution
  • 0m0.271s --> this solution
1
  • 1
    looks promising. thanks a lot, i'll take a look and compare peformance
    – ufk
    Jun 29 at 10:36
2

You can refactor your big regex into a sed script instead. Then the only resource limit really is how much memory you have available for sed.

If I am guessing correctly what you are trying, the solution might look something like

sed -e '/direction=2/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=2207891/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=22034418/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=22074450/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220201677/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220240574/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220272183/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220722988/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220723276/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220751152/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220774457/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220794227/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=220799141/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=2202000425/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=2202000939/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=2202000967/!b' \
    -e '/clear_number=/d'

If one clear_number could be the prefix of another, maybe change the regex slightly to make sure the number is followed by a word boundary. From your examples, adding a space before the terminating slash would seem sufficient, though some sed versions also support \> or \b for word boundaries.

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