7

I recently saw that Swift had introduced concurrency support with the Actor model in Swift 5.5. This model enables safe concurrent code to avoid data races when we have a shared, mutable state.

I want to avoid main thread data races in my app's UI. For this, I am wrapping DispatchQueue.main.async at the call site wherever I set a UIImageView.image property or a UIButton style.

// Original function
func setImage(thumbnailName: String) {
    myImageView.image = UIImage(named: thumbnailName)
}

// Call site
DispatchQueue.main.async {
    myVC.setImage(thumbnailName: "thumbnail")
}

This seems unsafe because I have to remember to dispatch the method manually on the main queue. The other solution looks like:

func setImage(thumbnailName: String) {
   DispatchQueue.main.async {
      myImageView.image = UIImage(named: thumbnailName)
   }
}

But this looks like a lot of boilerplate, and I wouldn't say I like using this for complex functions with more than one level of nesting.

The release of Swift support for Actors looks like a perfect solution for this. So, is there a way to make my code safer, i.e. always call UI functions on the main thread using Actors?

1
  • The @MainActor annotation is the right answer overall, but you can also run a specific block of code on the main actor from another actor with await MainActor.run { .... }
    – Bill
    Nov 23, 2021 at 13:22

1 Answer 1

23

Actors in Swift 5.5 🤹‍♀️

Actor isolation and re-entrancy are now implemented in the Swift stdlib. So, Apple recommends using the model for concurrent logic with many new concurrency features to avoid data races. Instead of lock-based synchronisation (lots of boilerplate), we now have a much cleaner alternative.

Some UIKit classes, including UIViewController and UILabel, now have out of the box support for @MainActor. So we only need to use the annotation in custom UI-related classes. For example, in the code above, myImageView.image would automatically be dispatched on the main queue. However, the UIImage.init(named:) call is not automatically dispatched on the main thread outside of a view controller.

In the general case, @MainActor is useful for concurrent access to UI-related state, and is the easiest to do even though we can manually dispatch too. I've outlined potential solutions below:

Solution 1

The simplest possible. This attribute could be useful in UI-Related classes. Apple have made the process much cleaner using the @MainActor method annotation:

@MainActor func setImage(thumbnailName: String) {
    myImageView.image = UIImage(image: thumbnailName)
}

This code is equivalent to wrapping in DispatchQueue.main.async, but the call site is now:

await setImage(thumbnailName: "thumbnail")

Solution 2

If you have Custom UI-related classes, we can consider applying @MainActor to the type itself. This ensures that all methods and properties are dispatched on the main DispatchQueue.

We can then manually opt out from the main thread using the nonisolated keyword for non-UI logic.

@MainActor class ListViewModel: ObservableObject {
    func onButtonTap(...) { ... }

    nonisolated func fetchLatestAndDisplay() async { ... }
}

We don't need to specify await explicitly when we call onButtonTap within an actor.

Solution 3 (Works for blocks, as well as functions)

We can also call functions on the main thread outside an actor with:

func onButtonTap(...) async {
    await MainActor.run { 
        ....
    }
}

Inside a different actor:

func onButtonTap(...) {
    await MainActor.run { 
        ....
    }
}

If we want to return from within a MainActor.run, simply specify that in the signature:

func onButtonTap(...) async -> Int {
    let result = await MainActor.run { () -> Int in
        return 3012
    }
    return result
}

This solution is slightly less cleaner than the above two solutions which are most suited for wrapping an entire function on the MainActor. However, actor.run also allows for inter threaded code between actors in one func (thx @Bill for the suggestion).

Solution 4 (Block solution that works within non-async functions)

An alternative way to schedule a block on the @MainActor to Solution 3:

func onButtonTap(...) {
    Task { @MainActor in
        ....
    }
}

The advantage here over Solution 3 is that the enclosing func doesn't need to be marked as async. Do note however that this dispatches the block later rather than immediately as in Solution 3.

Summary

Actors make Swift code safer, cleaner and easier to write. Don't overuse them, but dispatching UI code to the main thread is a great use case. Note that since the feature is still in beta, the framework may change/improve further in the future.

Since we can easily use the actor keyword interchangeably with class or struct, I want to advise limiting the keyword only to instances where concurrency is strictly needed. Using the keyword adds extra overhead to instance creation and so doesn't make sense when there is no shared state to manage.

If you don't need a shared state, then don't create it unnecessarily. struct instance creation is so lightweight that it's better to create a new instance most of the time. e.g. SwiftUI.

4
  • What do you mean by "don't overuse them"? Is there a particular problem this might cause?
    – deaton.dg
    Jun 11, 2021 at 20:42
  • "If you have a view controller with many UI methods, we can consider applying @MainActor to the type itself." This is wrong. View controllers etc. are already bound to the main actor.
    – matt
    Jun 19, 2021 at 20:27
  • 1
    You might want to read my biteinteractive.com/swift-5-5-replacing-gcd-with-async-await on how actors are the basis of thread switching as well as data locking.
    – matt
    Jun 19, 2021 at 20:29
  • That's new! I wrote this answer the day of the WWDC 21 video, and their example code used @MainActor class MyViewController: UIViewController. Thanks for letting me know. Nov 1, 2021 at 19:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.