I am trying to unit test a thin data access layer that I've written. I was hoping I wouldn't have to inject a stub of DriverManager into the class that makes the connection, and I don't have a mock framework available. I have check my implementation against MockRunner's MockDriver and it is very similar, but when I run the test I get a SQLException: "No suitable driver found for jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306." Here is the stub code:

public class DriverStub implements Driver
{
    @Override
    public boolean acceptsURL(String URL) throws SQLException
    {
        return true;
    }
    @Override
    public Connection connect(String url, Properties info) throws SQLException
    {
        return new ConnectionStub();
    }
    @Override
    public int getMajorVersion()
    {
        return 1;
    }
    @Override
    public int getMinorVersion()
    {
        return 0;
    }
    @Override
    public DriverPropertyInfo[] getPropertyInfo(String url, Properties info)
    throws SQLException
    {
        return new DriverPropertyInfo[0];
    }
    @Override
    public boolean jdbcCompliant()
    {
        return true;
    }
}

A fragment of the calling code:

Connection connection = null;
try
{
    Class.forName(driver).newInstance();
}
...
try
{
    connection = Drivermanager.getConnection(...);
}
...
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The Driver implementation should register an instance of the Driver through DriverManager.registerDriver in its static initialiser.

public class DriverStub implements Driver {
    static {
        java.sql.DriverManager.registerDriver(new DriverStub());
    }
    ...
}

It's a complete and utter hack, but there you go. Personally, I'd suggest ignoring DriverManager and linking directly to the driver.

  • Thank you. I'm quite comfortable using a hack in testing as long as it's not a gross hack and not one that results in integration testing. How do you link directly to the driver and does that have an advantage for the production code? – Keith Pinson Jul 22 '11 at 16:01
  • In the end I've put the manual registering code in a @BeforeClass method on the unit test in question; at that point, I don't see it as any more of a hack than any of the other fake things you have to do to unit test. – Keith Pinson Jul 22 '11 at 16:08
  • @Kazark A trouble using the DriverManager static method is that the driver remains registered. Another test with another driver (accepting the same URLs) may have problems. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 22 '11 at 18:01
  • Okay, thanks; good to know. I suppose I could use deregisterDriver in a teardown if that became a problem. – Keith Pinson Jul 25 '11 at 13:41

This seems to be far more effort than it's worth. Why would you want to stub the DriverManager? What does that test? How do you prove the worth of your data access layer by not using a real driver manager? Don't you want to connect to a database to test?

I'd load the JDBC driver and be done with it. This seems like mocking run amok to me.

  • You don't like unit tests? – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 22 '11 at 15:47
  • You are right of course that an (integration) test with the database is important. However, I would need to hear a more extensive argument to convince me that unit testing isn't worth it in this case. For example, it could be helpful to isolate where the problem is if the integration tests are failing. – Keith Pinson Jul 22 '11 at 15:57
  • Also, the effort required is not very high with Tom Hawtin's answer. – Keith Pinson Jul 22 '11 at 16:08

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.