126

So I'm finally reading through K&R, and I learned something within the first few pages, that there is a backspace escape character, \b.

So I go to test it out, and there is some very odd behavior:

#include <stdio.h>

main ()
{
    printf("hello worl\b\bd\n");
}

The output is

hello wodl

Can anyone explain this?

5 Answers 5

184

Your result will vary depending on what kind of terminal or console program you're on, but yes, on most \b is a nondestructive backspace. It moves the cursor backward, but doesn't erase what's there.

So for the hello worl part, the code outputs

hello worl
          ^

...(where ^ shows where the cursor is) Then it outputs two \b characters which moves the cursor backward two places without erasing (on your terminal):

hello worl
        ^

Note the cursor is now on the r. Then it outputs d, which overwrites the r and gives us:

hello wodl
         ^

Finally, it outputs \n, which is a non-destructive newline (again, on most terminals, including apparently yours), so the l is left unchanged and the cursor is moved to the beginning of the next line.

6
  • 2
    If it doesn't erase then why is the "r" gone?
    – cesoid
    May 18, 2016 at 14:04
  • 1
    @cesoid: "Your result will vary depending on what kind of terminal or console program you're on" May 18, 2016 at 14:06
  • 9
    @cesoid The r is replaced with d. The explanation still fits.
    – syockit
    Jun 10, 2016 at 1:21
  • 1
    @syockit Thanks. I didn't realize the cursor was "on" the character. I'm always thinking of word processors where they show it "between" characters (or terminal windows where it always inserts rather than overwrites). The edited explanation makes this clear.
    – cesoid
    Jun 10, 2016 at 14:21
  • 1
    @cesoid: Interesting about the terminal. In Windows, the cmd.exe and command.com terminals don't always insert (you can use the Ins key to toggle the behavior). I was surprised to find that Gnome Terminal on my main *nix computer always inserts, doesn't even seem to have a preference for it much less toggle based on the Ins key. Never noticed that before. Clearly I almost never want typeover. :-) Jun 10, 2016 at 14:25
130
..........
^ <= pointer to "print head"
            /* part1 */
            printf("hello worl");
hello worl
          ^ <= pointer to "print head"
            /* part2 */
            printf("\b");
hello worl
         ^ <= pointer to "print head"
            /* part3 */
            printf("\b");
hello worl
        ^ <= pointer to "print head"
            /* part4 */
            printf("d\n");
hello wodl

^ <= pointer to "print head" on the next line
2
  • If the cursor after part 4 is at the 'l' letter, shouldn't it be replaced by the '\n'? (resulting in "hello wor") Sep 6, 2016 at 13:31
  • 1
    @lucas_turci: the thing is that the '\n' does not have a representation on screen. What is already there stays the same; not replaced by a space or any other character representation.
    – pmg
    Sep 6, 2016 at 13:47
50

If you want a destructive backspace, you'll need something like

"\b \b"

i.e. a backspace, a space, and another backspace.

8
  • This still leaves the space character there isn't it?
    – Pacerier
    May 14, 2014 at 20:54
  • Well, yes, but the subsequent \b will mean the next output character will overwrite it.
    – Peter K.
    May 15, 2014 at 1:53
  • 1
    What if there is no subsequent character?
    – Pacerier
    May 18, 2014 at 17:00
  • 1
    Then it doesn't matter, does it?
    – Peter K.
    May 18, 2014 at 21:48
  • 4
    Hmm. Unless your device implements a "delete last character" option (e.g. DEL / 0x7f) , I'm stumped.
    – Peter K.
    May 19, 2014 at 16:49
8

Not too hard to explain... This is like typing hello worl, hitting the left-arrow key twice, typing d, and hitting the down-arrow key.

At least, that is how I infer your terminal is interpeting the \b and \n codes.

Redirect the output to a file and I bet you get something else entirely. Although you may have to look at the file's bytes to see the difference.

[edit]

To elaborate a bit, this printf emits a sequence of bytes: hello worl^H^Hd^J, where ^H is ASCII character #8 and ^J is ASCII character #10. What you see on your screen depends on how your terminal interprets those control codes.

2

Use a single backspace after each character printf("hello wor\bl\bd\n");

2
  • "hello wod\n"? What does that mean? Jan 29, 2019 at 7:53
  • 2
    The answerer just wants to show how to produce the behavior the OP expected.
    – Yolomep
    Sep 24, 2020 at 16:06

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