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I'm using Python to populate some tables in a MySQL 5.7.26. Python is unrelated, though. The issue occurs when running the queries by hand on the database as well.

I am adding data to some temporary table, say tmp_source and, due to the lack of a MERGE statement, I then do an INNER JOIN UPDATE on the destination table destination followed by a LEFT JOIN INSERT. The queries would look something like this:

UPDATE destination D
INNER JOIN tmp_source S
      ON D.col1 = S.col1
      AND D.col2 = S.col2
SET D.col3 = S.col3,
    D.col4 = S.col4;

INSERT INTO destination
SELECT * FROM tmp_source S
LEFT JOIN destination D
      ON D.col1 = S.col1
      AND D.col2 = S.col2
WHERE D.col1 IS NULL;

The intention is to update existing rows and insert missing ones, like a MERGE. But while the inserts work fine, updates sometimes fail due to:

1071, 'Specified key was too long; max key length is 1024 bytes'

I'm not allowed to modify the destination table structurally. It has some poorly made indexes (like VARCHAR(256) for columns that really never get over 50 characters) and I know this poses a problem.

I tried creating tmp_source with and without indexes - no dice.

Is there any way I can overcome this without altering the destination table? I have an "it's stupid but it works so it's not stupid" idea of generating static updates and just running those, such as:

UPDATE desination
SET col3 = val3,
    col4 = val4
WHERE col1 = val1
  AND col2 = val2

The idea is that I'm not handling an obscene amount of data. I could just catch this particular exception and only do this for tables where this occurs. Problematic tables will generally have less than 200 rows. And speed is not really of the essence in this case.

But it feels like such a workaround (probably because it is). Does anyone have a better idea?

2 Answers 2

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So... It just struck me that I basically forgot about one of the oldest tricks in the book: DELETE-INSERT.

It apparently works to do a DELETE on destination followed by the INSERT. And I could even UPDATE the tmp_source table if I want to preserve certain values before the DELETE.

So it would go like:

UPDATE tmp_source D
INNER JOIN destination S
      ON D.col1 = S.col1
      AND D.col2 = S.col2
SET D.col5 = S.col5,
    D.col6 = S.col6;

DELETE D
FROM destination D
INNER JOIN tmp_source S
      ON D.col1 = S.col1
      AND D.col2 = S.col2;

INSERT INTO destination
SELECT * FROM tmp_source S
LEFT JOIN destination D
      ON D.col1 = S.col1
      AND D.col2 = S.col2
WHERE D.col1 IS NULL;
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Have you tried it using Replace query ? Replace serves the property of update and Insert. If some data is changed from incremental value, it updates or else it inserts. Thanks !

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  • I didn't know of the REPLACE statement, probably because it appears to be MySQL specific syntax. While it's an interesting idea, from what I've read it is based off on the primary keys of the table, which is not always the case in my scenario. It also appears it does a DELETE - INSERT behind the scenes, but I feel like I have more control by doing that myself. Jun 12, 2021 at 17:02

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