62

I have a long and intricate list of <VirtualHost> directives, and I have to duplicate them into separate <VirtualHost> groups for ports 80 and 443 because I'm using SSL. Whenever I update my mod_rewrite rules I have to remember to do it in both places or else I'll break my app... this duplication is asking for trouble. Is there a way to combine or alias these -- the only difference between the two is that the port 443 version contains the SSLEngine, SSLCertificateFile and the like.

My <Virtualhost> contains many mod_rewrite rules, LocationMatch rules, CGI directives, etc.

Also, I can't use .htaccess files.

1

6 Answers 6

52

Can't you use an include directive to include the common rules. here

article

eg.:

<VirtualHost _default_:80>
    ...
    include conf/common_rule.conf
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost _default_:*>
    ...
    include conf/common_rule.conf
</VirtualHost> 

<VirtualHost _default_:443>
    ... #SSL rules
    include conf/common_rule.conf
</VirtualHost>  
2
  • thanks for this; btw, here's an updated version of the apache include directive, which is the first linked-to resource in your answer
    – ILMostro_7
    Feb 4, 2014 at 11:46
  • 1
    A simpler solution for me was to rename *:80 to *:443 and then setup a very tiny *:80 VirtualHost that redirects. I realize this doesn't directly answer the original question, but if there's interest I'm happy to share my config. May 1, 2019 at 23:29
36

You can use any # of hosts and ports in a single Virtualhost directive.

<VirtualHost addr[:port] [addr[:port]] ...> ... </VirtualHost> 

In My case I used.

<VirtualHost *:80 *:443>
  ServerName loop.lk

 ....
SSLEngine on
SSLCertificateFile /etc/apache2/ssl/local.crt

</VirtualHost>
10
  • 10
    SSLEngine on seems to be applied even when the site is accessed via http, resulting in an error page. Oct 9, 2013 at 7:05
  • 2
    If you have a <VirtualHost *:80 *:443> block, I'm assuming you can then have a separate block for <VirtualHost *:443> that only includes the SSL stuff. Is that correct?
    – iconoclast
    Nov 26, 2013 at 16:42
  • 3
    @iconoclast No you can't have another <VirtualHost > directive. You can use <If "%{SERVER_PROTOCOL} != 'HTTPS'"> .... </If> OR <If "%{SERVER_PORT} != '443'"> ... </If> Jan 27, 2014 at 9:08
  • @SampathPerera it does return an error message for me too: "Bad Request Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand. Reason: You're speaking plain HTTP to an SSL-enabled server port. Instead use the HTTPS scheme to access this URL, please." Jun 24, 2015 at 14:37
  • ..and it does in fact use HTTPS on both 80 and 443 ports, which can be proven by using URL like yourhost.yourdomain.com:80 in your browser. Jun 24, 2015 at 14:38
10

Sorry to bump up an old post like this, but in order to help other Googlers out there I wanted to share how I dealt with it:

I have a couple of vhosts on my localhost, say: localhost, foo.com, bar.com

This being a localhost site on my laptop (macosx) I could get away with self-signed certificates and thus the ssl-part is the same for all the vhosts...

What I did is this:

I created the directory /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/.

I created a /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/localhost.conf:

ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "/www/localhost"
<Directory /www/localhost>
  Require all granted
</Directory>
ErrorLog "/var/log/apache2/localhost.error_log"
CustomLog "/var/log/apache2/localhost.access_log" common

A /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/foo.conf:

ServerName foo.com
DocumentRoot "/www/foo.com"
<Directory /www/foo.com>
  Require all granted
</Directory>
ErrorLog "/var/log/apache2/foo.com.error_log"
CustomLog "/var/log/apache2/foo.com.access_log" common

A /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/bar.conf:

ServerName bar.com
DocumentRoot "/www/bar.com"
<Directory /www/bar.com>
  Require all granted
</Directory>
ErrorLog "/var/log/apache2/bar.com.error_log"
CustomLog "/var/log/apache2/bar.com.access_log" common

And finally a /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/ssl.conf:

SSLEngine on
SSLCertificateFile "/etc/apache2/ssl/server.crt"
SSLCertificateKeyFile "/etc/apache2/ssl/server.key"

And in my /etc/apache2/extra/httpd-vhosts.conf:

<VirtualHost *:80>
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/localhost.conf
</VirtualHost>
<VirtualHost *:443>
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/localhost.conf
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/ssl.conf
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:80>
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/foo.conf
</VirtualHost>
<VirtualHost *:443>
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/foo.conf
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/ssl.conf
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:80>
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/bar.conf
</VirtualHost>
<VirtualHost *:443>
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/bar.conf
  Include /etc/apache2/extra/vhosts/ssl.conf
</VirtualHost>
2
  • Also went with this solution. Works great Nov 6, 2015 at 18:35
  • No need to apologize for "bumping". StackOverflow's point is to collect the best answers, not to be a chat room. The idea of needing to have a different thread based on time is a holdover from the days of dial-up Bulletin Board Systems.
    – hackerb9
    Sep 2, 2022 at 23:09
7

Another option instead of using Include is using Macro (so you can keep it all in one file).

First enable the macro module:

a2enmod macro

Then put your shared stuff in a macro and use it from your virtualhosts:

<Macro SharedStuff>
   ServerName example.com
   ServerAdmin example@example.com
   <DocumentRoot /var/www/example>
      ...
   </DocumentRoot>
</Macro>

<VirtualHost *:80>
  Use SharedStuff
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:443>
  Use SharedStuff

  SSLEngine On
  SSLProtocol All -SSLv2 -SSLv3
  ...
</VirtualHost>

Macros can also take parameters, and be defined in other files that are included; so you can use them a bit like Functions, and save a lot of duplication across your Apache config files.

See here for more details:

https://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/mod/mod_macro.html

2
  • Great answer, but this isn't in 2.2 in case anyone wanted to know.
    – poolnoodl
    Feb 11, 2019 at 1:14
  • No, this is a 2.4 onward feature; however, 2.2 went EOL with the final release in July 2017 so really everyone should be on 2.4 by now :)
    – Seb
    Feb 19, 2019 at 13:54
2

You could put the common configuration into a separate file and include it in both VirtualHost segments. For example:

<VirtualHost 192.168.1.2:80>
  Include conf/common.conf
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost 192.168.1.2:443>
  Include conf/common.conf
  (put your ssl specific cofiguration stuff here ...)
</VirtualHost>
0

You could also specify the common directives within a container instead of within the itself. That's what I do, mostly because I prefer mod_rewrite rules at the directory level instead of at the server level, but it should work equally well for you too.

1
  • 5
    You're missing a critically important word. Can you add that? And if you could give an example that would also be helpful.
    – iconoclast
    Nov 26, 2013 at 16:43

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