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I don't know there is std::addressof available in c++ standard library until today I read some blog. In my understanding, if opeartor & is overloaded, then std::addressof should be used, otherwise it's not necessary to use std::addressof, it should be equivalent with &.

However, just trying to use std::addressof, to validate if it is the same as &, I meet compile error: "call to deleted function 'addressof' ". Don't know why.

Here's the minimal code to demonstrate this problem:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo(int _len): len(_len) {
        if(len>0) {
            data = new double[len];
        }
        // compile error: call to deleted function 'addressof'
        std::cout << "Foo()    " << std::addressof(this) << "/" << std::addressof(data) << std::endl;
    }
    ~Foo() {
        // compile ok
        std::cout << "~Foo()    " << (void*)this << "/" << (void*)data << std::endl;

        // compile error: call to deleted function 'addressof'
        std::cout << "~Foo()    " << std::addressof(this) << "/" << std::addressof(data) << std::endl;

        if (data!=nullptr) {
            delete[] data;
        }
    }

private:
    int len;
    double* data;
};

int main() {
    Foo(42);

    return 0;
}
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  • 2
    Same reason you can't use &this. It just doesn't make sense. – cpplearner Jun 13 at 2:51
  • So stupid was I... I should notice that std::addressof(this) should be std::addressof(*this) but this looks more complicated.. – ChrisZZ Jun 13 at 2:54
  • side note: there's probably a better design without using std::addressof at all ... – OrenIshShalom Jun 13 at 2:59
1

C++ standard:

§9.3.2 The this pointer

the keyword this is a prvalue expression

std::addressof

template <class T>
const T* addressof(const T&&) = delete;

So addressof overload for rvalues is deleted. The reason is because you cannot take the address of a prvalue so addressof is modeled to respect that.

That's why you get the error.


Please note that addressof(this) and (void*) this are not even in the same ballpark. The equivalent of addressof(this) would be &this which also doesn't compile.

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