1

I have list lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

  • if i m searching for 12, My out put should (4,8), (5,7)
  • My current out is showing only (4,8)
  • if i m printing my return then reverse of list is also printing like (4,8), (5,7), (8,4), (7,5)
def find_sum(s, lst):
    indices = {x: i for i, x in enumerate(lst)}
#     print(indices)
    for i, x in enumerate(lst):
        target = s - x
        if target in indices:
            return (lst[i], lst[indices[target]])

    return None

lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
print(find_sum(12, lst)) 

Expected (4,8), (5,7)

3
  • what's your actual?
    – drum
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:37
  • 2
    you return immediately: return (lst[i], lst[indices[target]])... why do you expect to return (4,8), (5,7)??? Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:42
  • We can add the tuple to the list, then check if the list is not empty,
    – user15801675
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:51

5 Answers 5

6

Try this:

import itertools

def find_sum(s, lst):
    return [x for x in itertools.combinations(lst, r=2) if x[0] + x[1] == s]

lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
print(find_sum(12, lst))

Output:

[(4, 8), (5, 7)]
3
  • Note that this is O(n!).
    – enzo
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:52
  • 1
    @enzo Isn't it O(n^2)?
    – wjandrea
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:53
  • 2
    @wjandrea Yes, you're right, I misread it as permutations. Either way, the OP's solution is O(n).
    – enzo
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:57
2

You have already got several other answers, but just for fun, using recursion:

def find_sum(s, lst):
    if len(lst) <= 1: # with list of length <= 1, impossible to find a pair
        return []
    x, sublst = lst[0], lst[1:]
    if s - x in sublst:
        return [(x, s - x)] + find_sum(s, sublst)
    else:
        return find_sum(s, sublst)

lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
print(find_sum(12, lst)) # [(4, 8), (5, 7)]

In each recursion step, given a list, we pick the head element (name it x) and the rest of the list sublst. If there is an element in sublst that sums with x to make the given number, then return x and something else. This something else part is where recursion happens; we have only considered pairs with (x, y) where y is in sublst, not pairs within the sublst. So we need to call find_sum again, with this sublst. This recursion process ends when the given list has length 1 or empty; in those cases there is no pairs to consider, so just return an empty list.

Note that else here is redundant, because of return before it. But I like it to be there anyway.


The following is another version using generator:

def find_sum(s, lst):
    lst = lst.copy()
    while lst:
        x = lst.pop(0)
        if s - x in lst:
            yield x, s - x

lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
print(list(find_sum(12, lst))) # [(4, 8), (5, 7)]
3
  • 1
    @PaulRooney Thank you for the suggestion! I tried implementing a generator and added it. Since I am new to this concept, please let me know if it can be improved!
    – j1-lee
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 4:26
  • i m new to recursion, when and where it stops execution. where the iteration is happening.? . Can you explain the code
    – Nons
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 17:22
  • how you become expert in python, like dynamic programming
    – Nons
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 19:21
1

When you call return, you are ending the function. This means that once you find the first pair, your function ends, and you can't find anymore pairs.

To fix this, you should add an array in the function called good_pairs (or whatever you want). Instead of writing return (lst[i], lst[indices[target]]), you should write good_pairs.append((lst[i], lst[indices[target]])).

At the end, simply return the good_pairs list.

Then just print it in whatever format you want.

Final Code:

def find_sum(s, lst):
    s.sort()
    good_pairs = []
    indices = {x: i for i, x in enumerate(lst[:len(lst)//2])}
    # print(indices)
    for i, x in enumerate(lst):
        target = s - x
        if target in indices:
            good_pairs.append((lst[i], lst[indices[target]]))

    return good_pairs

lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
print(find_sum(12, lst)) 

I first sorted the array, and then enumerated only half of the array to prevent duplicates. Credit to @enzo

Hope this helps and good luck :)

10
  • Nice answer! Just some missing details: 1) you forgot to create the good_pairs list inside the function and 2) the expected output for OP is (4,8), (5,7) instead of (4, 8), (5, 7), (6, 6), (7, 5), (8, 4), but you can fix this by replacing enumerate(lst) with enumerate(lst[:len(lst)//2]) to search only the first half of the original list. Otherwise, this is the best answer I've ever experienced in StackOverflow.
    – enzo
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:48
  • List, not array Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:49
  • @enzo Thanks so much! I really appreciated the feedback. I'll make sure to fix up my code.
    – user15165352
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:52
  • @MadPhysicist Darn, I always mix those two terms up. Thanks for the clarification!
    – user15165352
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:52
  • good_pairs.append(lst[i], lst[indices[target]]) , it will throw error TypeError: append() takes exactly one argument (2 given)
    – Nons
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 3:55
1

return ends the function. You can use yield instead, which is like a multi-return.

To avoid reversed duplicates, you can simply check that x <= target.

You also need to add i != indices[target] to make sure that you don't get (6, 6).

def find_sum(s, lst):
    indices = {x: i for i, x in enumerate(lst)}
    for i, x in enumerate(lst):
        target = s - x
        if x <= target and target in indices and i != indices[target]:
            yield x, target  # <- I also simplified this
>>> lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
>>> list(find_sum(12, lst))  # <- Note the `list()` here.
[(4, 8), (5, 7)]

Although, thinking about it a bit more, indices doesn't account for multiple instances. If that's on purpose, then lst can be cast to set without losing any info, and the solution becomes a bit simpler:

def find_sum(s, lst):
    targets = set(lst)
    for x in targets:
        target = s - x
        if x < target and target in targets:
            yield x, target
2
  • If lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 6, 7, 8], then i != indices[target] will cut off one of the variants Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 4:11
  • @АлексейР Yes, that's on purpose. I'm just about to edit to clarify.
    – wjandrea
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 4:12
0

Counting the the pairs with sum divisible by an integer k

def divisibleSumPairs(n, k, ar):
   
    import itertools
    
    return len([x for x in itertools.combinations(ar,r=2) if (x[0]+x[1])%k==0])
1
  • 1
    Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Ethan
    Commented Jun 7, 2022 at 11:59

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