7

My intent is to understand the “cooperative thread pool” used by Swift 5.5’s async-await, and how task groups automatically constrain the degree of concurrency: Consider the following task group code, doing 32 calculations in parallel:

func launchTasks() async {
    await withTaskGroup(of: Void.self) { group in
        for i in 0 ..< 32 {
            group.async(priority: .userInitiated) { [self] in
                let value = await doSomething(with: i)
                // do something with `value`
            }
        }
    }
}

While I hoped it would constrain the degree of concurrency, as advertised, I'm only getting two (!) concurrent tasks at a time. That is far more constrained than I would have expected:

enter image description here

If I use the old GCD concurrentPerform ...

func launchTasks2() {
    DispatchQueue.global().async {
        DispatchQueue.concurrentPerform(iterations: 32) { [self] i in
            let value = doSomething2(with: i)
            // do something with `value`
        }
    }
}

... I get twelve at a time, taking full advantage of the device (iOS 15 simulator on my 6-core i9 MacBook Pro) while avoiding thread-explosion:

enter image description here

(FWIW, both of these were profiled in Xcode 13.0 beta 1 (13A5154h) running on Big Sur. And please disregard the minor differences in the individual “jobs” in these two runs, as the function in question is just spinning for a random duration; the key observation is the degree of concurrency is what we would have expected.)

It is excellent that this new async-await (and task groups) automatically limits the degree of parallelism, but the cooperative thread pool of async-await is far more constrained than I would have expected. And I see of no way to adjust these parameters of that pool. How can we better take advantage of our hardware while still avoiding thread explosion (without resorting to old techniques like non-zero semaphores or operation queues)?

7

It looks like this curious behavior is a limitation of the simulator. If I run it on my physical iPhone 12 Pro Max, the async-await task group approach results in 6 concurrent tasks ...

enter image description here

... which is essentially the same as the concurrentPerform behavior:

enter image description here

The behavior, including the degree of concurrency, is essentially the same on the physical device.

One is left to infer that the simulator appears to be configured to constrain async-await more than what is achievable with direct GCD calls. But on actual physical devices, the async-await task group behavior is as one would expect.

3
  • As I understand correctly, the new cooperative thread pool, unlike the previous one, does not overcommit the system (no more than one thread of each core is running). This allows us to get rid of idle threads and unnecessary context switches. But from your screenshot of concurrentPerform-solution it looks like the GCD optimized in exactly the same way. Is it so? – Gringo Russo Jul 3 at 13:06
  • Yes, both concurrentPerform and the new cooperative thread pool approaches constrain the number of threads, avoiding thread explosion. The main benefit, IMHO, is that this avoids deadlocks that can arise when thread explosion exhausts GCD’s very limited pool of worker threads. – Rob Jul 3 at 15:04
  • The key is that naive GCD implementations (e.g., where you call async inside a for) can easily exhaust the worker threads. We could get around this problem with careful coding (concurrentPerform or clever use of non-zero dispatch semaphores), but this new cooperative thread pool appears to have baked it into the basic design. – Rob Jul 3 at 15:11

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