108

I was following this tutorial on using React.forwardRef, where make this component:

import React from "react";

const Search = React.forwardRef<HTMLInputElement>((props, ref) => {
  return <input ref={ref} type="search" />;
});

export default Search;

However, running my app, the component causes the following error:

Component definition is missing display name  react/display-name

Based on this question, I thought I might do something like this:

const Search = MySearch = React.forwardRef<HTMLInputElement>((props, ref) => {
  return <input ref={ref} type="search" />;
});

export default Search;

But this did not fix the problem either.

So then, how can I give my component a display name?

2
  • I'm not sure how the linked question led you to the attempted solution; nothing you did sets the display name. Commented Jun 15, 2021 at 20:15
  • (The linked question's answers do show how to set the display name, in a slightly difference context, but same thing.) Commented Jun 15, 2021 at 20:21

10 Answers 10

239

The Component definition is missing display name react/display-name message is likely coming from a tool like eslint.

It is a linting rule that exists in order to help you follow style guides and/or conventions regarding what is considered good practice when writing React code.

That particular rule in eslint is explained in further details here: https://github.com/yannickcr/eslint-plugin-react/blob/master/docs/rules/display-name.md

From that page you can also find why it exists and what the displayName property on React Components is good for, namely to help when debugging, since it means that it will print your component's displayName property to the console instead of just input.

Also, from that link, you can find that when you are using function components, you can address that by setting the displayName property on the component. This should probably help you:

import React from "react";

const Search = React.forwardRef<HTMLInputElement>((props, ref) => {
  return <input ref={ref} type="search" />;
});
Search.displayName = "Search";

export default Search;

Another option is to just disable that particular linter, using a comment with // eslint-disable-next-line react/display-name or similar just above the declaration of your component.

That would however mean that if you were to need to debug your app, this component would simply be called input instead of Search, which might make the debugging a bit harder.

6
  • 1
    Somehow, i did read the error message, but just couldn't figure out that's what it means.
    – windmaomao
    Commented Mar 26, 2022 at 15:53
  • Yes, it's one of those things where you almost have to encounter it enough times to recognize the format and then remember "Oh, that looks like a linter message".
    – Frost
    Commented Mar 31, 2022 at 11:29
  • 8
    Search.displayName = "Search"; This line fixed the error.
    – Mridul Das
    Commented May 8, 2022 at 1:12
  • isn't it a readonly property? is there a work around for typescript? Commented Nov 16, 2022 at 12:51
  • 1
    THANK YOU. So helpful. displayName should be an argument in forwardRef.
    – sambecker
    Commented Jan 24, 2023 at 5:08
54
+250

I've recently had the same issue and resolved it this way. Might not be the prettiest but could be preferred to some. Where ComponentName is the React name and the ExportName is what you will import in other places.

const ComponentName = (props, ref) => {
  return (
    <div ref={ref}></div>
  );
};
export const ExportName = forwardRef(ComponentName);
2
  • Are you really passing the forwardRef function itself as the component's ref?
    – Mordechai
    Commented Nov 4, 2021 at 14:00
  • Irrelevant to the question really but i can edit with correct syntax for the fowardRef Commented Nov 5, 2021 at 15:08
40

You could use a named function (see function Search) instead of the anonymous arrow fn, like in the example below.

const Search = React.forwardRef<HTMLInputElement>(function Search(props, ref) {
  return <input ref={ref} type="search" />;
});

export default Search;
17
import React from "react";

const Search = React.forwardRef<HTMLInputElement>(function Search(props, ref) {
  return <input ref={ref} type="search" />;
});

export default Search;

In this way, you can fix the problem. I suggest we'd better know why eslint limit the way of writting

16

In addition to Larsson's response (which I think it's the way to go), if you still want to have the typings you can do something like this:

import { forwardRef, ForwardRefRenderFunction } from "react";

type MyComponentProps = {
  something: string;
}

type RefProps = {
  something: string;
}

const MyComponent: ForwardRefRenderFunction<RefProps, MyComponentProps> = (props, ref) => {
  return <div>Works</div>;
}

export default forwardRef(MyComponent);
1
  • 2
    This answer works best out of the rest for my setup, with a bunch of ESLint rules that force named components, arrow functions, and other modern TS/React. Commented Jan 19, 2022 at 2:04
2

Here is my solution the previous ones didnt work for me:

import React, { forwardRef, Ref } from 'react';
import { SliderItemContainer, SliderItemContent } from '../styles/SliderItem.styles';
import { SliderItemType } from '../utils/Slider.data';

type SliderItemProps = {
  item: SliderItemType;
};

const SliderItem = ({ item }: SliderItemProps, ref: Ref<HTMLDivElement>) => {
  return (
    <SliderItemContainer ref={ref} image={item.image}>
      <SliderItemContent>
        <h1>{item.title}</h1>
        <p>{item.description}</p>
        <button>{item.buttonText}</button>
      </SliderItemContent>
    </SliderItemContainer>
  );
};

export default forwardRef(SliderItem);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.6.3/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.6.3/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

Usage outside of the component is also simple I just wrapped SliderItem component with motion, named it MotionSliderItem.

const MotionSliderItem = motion(SliderItem);
<MotionSliderItem ..... />

0

I had a similar issue today. I use the DetailsList from @fluentui: Each column has an optional property onRender which passes the current item so that you can return a custom component to format your data. I was trying something like this: onRender: (item: PlannerTask) => <TitleColumn item={item} />. This gave me the error. I found two ways to fix it for me.

Varian 1: Give the child a name

onRender: function titleColumn (item: PlannerTask) { return <TitleColumn item={item} /> }

Variant 2 (what I did eventually):

In my component file I also export a function that returns the component:

export const createTitleColumn = (item: PlannerTask): JSX.Element => {
    return <TitleColumn item={item} />
}

Then I just pass this:

onRender: createTitleColumn

Conclusion

I like this variant most because it doesn't overcomplicate things and I personally found the second option to be very readable as well.

Overall I think that the eslint error was a false positive in my case, because there's nothing wrong with my original code. However I try to avoid disabling linting or compiler errors/rules, because they don't just exist to annoy us ;)

0

All the answers here using types, here is our solution with interfaces:

import { Ref, forwardRef } from 'react';

interface Props {
    "foo": string
}

const Input = ({ foo }: Props, ref: Ref<HTMLInputElement>) => {
    return <input foo={foo} ref={ref} type="text" />;
};

export default forwardRef(Input);
0

Base on A. Backhagen 's answer, add a few edits to work with typescript:

const ComponentName = (props, ref: React.ForwardedRef< HTMLInputElement >) => {
  return (
    <div ref={ref}></div>
  );
};
export const ExportName = forwardRef(ComponentName);
-1

Put this at the beginning of your file:

/* eslint-disable react/display-name */

You could also try this: // eslint-disable-next-line react/display-name

1
  • 2
    This does not answer the question "How do I give my component a display name". It will make the error/warning message go away, but it does not actually answer the question.
    – Frost
    Commented Jun 15, 2021 at 20:32

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