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To reach a secret stored in GCP's Secret Manager I need a user with the permission todo that, like for instance a SA+roles/secretManages.Accessor. There's no other way we can access the secrets from secret manager. Right?

Is it safe to assume that giving a GCP default account the role above would be safe? projnumber-compute@developer.gserviceaccount.com - Compute Engine default service account

With the above I could potentially build an app to get the secret using the default account and then authenticate with the credential(pseudo-code):

project = "myproject"
# The lines below will use the default account
client = secretmanager.SecretManagerServiceClient()
request = {"name": f"projects/11111111/secrets/mysecret/versions/latest"}
response = client.access_secret_version(request)

payload = response.payload.data.decode("UTF-8")
json_acct_info = json.loads(payload)

# Then use the credential from another SA to authenticate and list buckets
credentials = service_account.Credentials.from_service_account_info(json_acct_info)
storage_client = storage.Client(credentials=credentials, project=project)
buckets = list(storage_client.list_buckets())

Is this safe? :-)

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    You should use a custom service account (not the default compute service account) and attach it to your VM/Cloud Run/Cloud Function with the correct permissions.
    – sethvargo
    Jun 16 at 17:22
  • Service account key files are rarely the best solution. Use custom service account on your services/compute engine. Jun 16 at 18:23
  • Oh my, @sethvargo commented in my question. I'm honored. *. * I understand the custom SA is recommended for everything in the cloud. But could you add more info to your comment? I mean, are you recommending the custom account usage to have a really, really least privilege, to have an account with only the SM.accessor role? Thx!
    – lala
    Jun 16 at 19:41
  • @guillaumeblaquiere, what do you mean? I'm not using any key files. I'm using the default service account, without any keys, to get the credential from SM, at runtime, for a given custom SA. Then I switch context because the custom SA has the roles I need to access the resources user by the app.
    – lala
    Jun 16 at 19:47
  • Don't use the default compute service account (#-copute@developer.gserviceaccount.com). Where are you running your workload?
    – sethvargo
    Jun 16 at 19:56
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Yes, this is secure. The act of storing credentials in Google Secret Manager is the whole point of Google Secret Manager.

However, there are two things you can do in addition to this act that will improve the security of your app:

  1. Create a custom service account rather than using the default Compute Engine SA. Using a custom SA makes its name harder to guess, and harder to use in a brute force attack.
  2. If you do pull down creds into temporary JSON keyfile, make sure to delete the keyfile as part of your script as soon as you're done using it. (Obviously, don't delete the secret from GSM, or you'll have a whole other set of problems to deal with.)
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  • I know that storing credentials in SM is safe. The question is more like to get answers for the 'chicken and the egg dilemma' that I got into. What is the most secure way to get a credential from secret manager if I need first to have a account authenticated to gcp to read....from the secret manager. Thx for your contribution! ^^
    – lala
    Jun 16 at 19:58
  • You should never store GCP credentials inside of Secret Manager. Doing so transforms an identity management problem into a secrets management problem. Use custom service accounts or service account impersonation instead.
    – sethvargo
    Jun 16 at 20:02
  • @sethvargo I fear I wasn't clear. what I should have said, rather than suggesting that the "custom service account" step was an additional thing, is that you should use a custom SA instead of using the GCP default Compute SA. TBH it never would have occurred to me to store the default SA creds in Secrets Manager because the first thing I do in any project is replace it with a custom SA. oh well! downvote's a downvote. ¯_(ツ)_/¯
    – ingernet
    Jun 18 at 21:44

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