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I am trying to understand tasks and parallelism in C#. I have the code below in console application. I was expecting the code after Sleep() method to run after 3 millisecond but the program exits.

Can anyone please provide insights to why it's not waiting for 3 milliseconds and complete the execution of the remaining code. How can I make remaining code get executed after 3 millisecond?

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Task task = new Task(() =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Task on thread {0} started.",
            Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            Thread.Sleep(3000);
            Console.WriteLine("Task on thread {0} finished.",
            Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
        });

        task.Start();
        Console.WriteLine("this is the main thread");

       

    }

enter image description here

9
  • Q: I was expecting the code after Sleep() method to run after 3 millisecond but the program exits. A: The program exits because you didn't do anything to STOP it from exiting. Personally, I'd recommend putting a Console.ReadLine() after your final "Console.WriteLine()". There are other alternatives, as well. For example, you can call task.Wait() in your Main(): docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/…
    – paulsm4
    Jun 17, 2021 at 2:33
  • The argument to Sleep is measured in milliseconds. Sleep(3000) will sleep for 3 seconds, not 3ms. You are dispatching your background work to a thread pool thread (which is a "Background thread" and will not keep your app alive). The way your program works is you start your app, dispatch work to a thread pool thread. It starts, but then stops for 3 seconds. Meanwhile, the foreground thread continues on and quits, ending the execution of your app before the Sleep ends.
    – Flydog57
    Jun 17, 2021 at 2:59
  • As a side note, creating tasks with the Task constructor is frowned upon by the experts, unless you are doing something advanced that requires it. The common way of starting delegate-based tasks is by using the Task.Run method. Jun 17, 2021 at 3:09
  • Thank you @paulsm4 for providing insights into the code. I got why the code was not working as expected.
    – sabin
    Jun 17, 2021 at 3:20
  • @Flydog57 Thank you for providing insights. It was helpful.
    – sabin
    Jun 17, 2021 at 3:25

2 Answers 2

3

Use await Task.Delay(3000); instead of Thread.Sleep(3000); (example below).

Please note the snippet below is a modified version of your original code snippet but with modifications for demonstration.

static async Task Main()
{
    await Task.Run(async () =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Task on thread {0} started.", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
        await Task.Delay(3000);
        Console.WriteLine("Task on thread {0} finished.", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    });
    Console.WriteLine("this is the main thread");
}

Note: The above snippet is only intended for exploring Tasks thus not to be used in a production environment. Simply removing the usage of Task within question code snippet would be functionally equivalent, however this solution is meant to illustrate how Task could be used.

11
  • The await operator can be used only with in async lambda expression. This code will not be compiled without async.
    – Amit Verma
    Jun 17, 2021 at 2:29
  • 1
    What's the point of awaiting a Task.Run? You could just remove that code and it would run the same. Jun 17, 2021 at 4:55
  • 1
    @Enigmativity the first sentence of the question explains: I am trying to understand tasks and parallelism in C#.. Jun 17, 2021 at 7:33
  • 1
    @Enigmativity - gives reason for your question "What's the point of awaiting a Task.Run?". To learn, understand, and explore Tasks. Jun 17, 2021 at 16:01
  • 2
    @Enigmativity - fair enough, thanks for the suggestion. Answer updated with disclaimer that intent is purely educational. Jun 18, 2021 at 19:08
1

you need to wait for the task to complete. And 3000 is equivalent to 3 seconds...it is not 3 milliseconds.

Task task = new Task(() =>
            {
                System.Console.WriteLine("Task on thread {0} started.",
                Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
                Thread.Sleep(3000);
                System.Console.WriteLine("Task on thread {0} finished.",
                Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            });

            task.Start();
            
            System.Console.WriteLine("this is the main thread");
            task.Wait();
3
  • yes, you are right its 3 second but its not printing as you can see in output window Thank you!!
    – sabin
    Jun 17, 2021 at 2:36
  • @sabin code edited. You need to adjust task.wait() according to your requirement.
    – Amit Verma
    Jun 17, 2021 at 2:41
  • I couldn't find the article of @StephenCleary about handcrafting Tasks. But it is not advisable to calling the Task ctor manually. The preferred way is either Task.Run or Task.Factory.StartNew. Jun 17, 2021 at 6:48

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