151

Does Postgres have any way to say ALTER TABLE foo ADD CONSTRAINT bar ... which will just ignore the command if the constraint already exists, so that it doesn't raise an error?

11 Answers 11

178

A possible solution is to simply use DROP IF EXISTS before creating the new constraint.

ALTER TABLE foo DROP CONSTRAINT IF EXISTS bar;
ALTER TABLE foo ADD CONSTRAINT bar ...;

Seems easier than trying to query information_schema or catalogs, but might be slow on huge tables since it always recreates the constraint.

Edit 2015-07-13: Kev pointed out in his answer that my solution creates a short window when the constraint doesn't exist and is not being enforced. While this is true, you can avoid such a window quite easily by wrapping both statements in a transaction.

4
  • 7
    I know this thread is old, but perhaps worth pointing out that transactions usually apply to DML, and alter table commands are DDL. DDL commands can't usually be rolled back (depending on the database). That being said, Postgres does support rolling back DDL while Oracle and MySQL do not. See this thread for DB-specific details: stackoverflow.com/questions/4692690/…
    – MattW
    Commented Apr 10, 2018 at 0:00
  • 8
    I'd recommend against writing code that drops constraints only to recreate them, as Webmut points out that could be slow on huge tables. Don't take the risk, instead first check to see whether the constraint exists, I show how in another answer to this question.
    – jamiet
    Commented Apr 11, 2019 at 1:20
  • You will run into issues if the statement needs to be repeatable. E.g. You first create constraint A like this, then you create constraint B which somehow depends on constraint A. Afterwards, you have to re-run the statement which contains the creation of constraint A - it will throw an error: Cannot drop A because B depends on it.
    – cis
    Commented Aug 12, 2020 at 5:03
  • Dropping a unique constraint will also drop the associated index. So this will recreate the index right after, on large table this will be terribly slow
    – HHK
    Commented May 18, 2022 at 15:44
93

This might help, although it may be a bit of a dirty hack:

create or replace function create_constraint_if_not_exists (
    t_name text, c_name text, constraint_sql text
) 
returns void AS
$$
begin
    -- Look for our constraint
    if not exists (select constraint_name 
                   from information_schema.constraint_column_usage 
                   where table_name = t_name  and constraint_name = c_name) then
        execute constraint_sql;
    end if;
end;
$$ language 'plpgsql'

Then call with:

SELECT create_constraint_if_not_exists(
        'foo',
        'bar',
        'ALTER TABLE foo ADD CONSTRAINT bar CHECK (foobies < 100);')

Updated:

As per Webmut's answer below suggesting:

ALTER TABLE foo DROP CONSTRAINT IF EXISTS bar;
ALTER TABLE foo ADD CONSTRAINT bar ...;

That's probably fine in your development database, or where you know you can shut out the apps that depend on this database for a maintenance window.

But if this is a lively mission critical 24x7 production environment you don't really want to be dropping constraints willy nilly like this. Even for a few milliseconds there's a short window where you're no longer enforcing your constraint which may allow errant values to slip through. That may have unintended consequences leading to considerable business costs at some point down the road.

10
  • I think that 'myconstraint' should be 'bar' in your last example. Commented Jul 24, 2011 at 9:17
  • 3
    I would further modify this answer so that the execute statement is execute 'ALTER TABLE ' || t_name || ' ADD CONSTRAINT ' || c_name || ' ' || constraint_sql; and calling the function would then look like SELECT create_constraint_if_not_exists('foo', 'bar', 'CHECK (foobies < 100);');. This makes sure you can't mess up the arguments in your constraint SQL because they are based on the original parameters. Commented Sep 2, 2014 at 11:58
  • 8
    The short window is removed by using a transaction.
    – OrangeDog
    Commented Mar 11, 2019 at 12:36
  • 1
    This wouldn't find some foreign key constraint, but selecting from information_schema.table_constraints does.
    – iElectric
    Commented Oct 20, 2019 at 16:34
  • 1
    Solution 3: just execute the ALTER TABLE ... query normally and ignore error if SQL state is "42P07".
    – rustyx
    Commented Jan 15, 2021 at 22:22
45

You can use an exception handler inside an anonymous DO block to catch the duplicate object error.

DO $$
BEGIN

  BEGIN
    ALTER TABLE foo ADD CONSTRAINT bar ... ;
  EXCEPTION
    WHEN duplicate_table THEN  -- postgres raises duplicate_table at surprising times. Ex.: for UNIQUE constraints.
    WHEN duplicate_object THEN
      RAISE NOTICE 'Table constraint foo.bar already exists';
  END;

END $$;

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.4/static/sql-do.html http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.4/static/plpgsql-control-structures.html http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.4/static/errcodes-appendix.html

5
  • 4
    Had to change duplicate_object to duplicate_table (code 42P07). Postgres 9.6
    – volvpavl
    Commented Mar 31, 2017 at 8:23
  • Postgres 10.1 has it back to duplicate_object.
    – Tanktalus
    Commented Jul 23, 2018 at 22:32
  • 8
    duplicate_object for FOREIGN KEY. duplicate_table for UNIQUE constraints. Postgres 9.6.8
    – dfritch
    Commented Apr 4, 2019 at 4:13
  • 1
    invalid_table_definition for PRIMARY KEY on Postgres 11.9
    – Soraphis
    Commented Jun 15, 2021 at 13:15
  • my favourite solution
    – Peter
    Commented Jan 12 at 9:08
26

you can run query over pg_constraint table to find constraint exists or not.like:

SELECT 1 FROM pg_constraint WHERE conname = 'constraint_name'"
5
  • 7
    There is an IF EXISTS option for DROP CONSTRAINT but, AFAIK, nothing for ADD CONSTRAINT. Commented Jul 23, 2011 at 17:29
  • 1
    Are constraint names local to a table? What happens if there are two tables with a constraint named constraint_name?
    – guettli
    Commented Jun 10, 2014 at 8:44
  • Yes, you could get false positives if another table had the same constraint name. But this is still a decent solution if you're 100% in control of your naming.
    – Joe M
    Commented Feb 6, 2015 at 21:50
  • This is what worked for me.
    – Sam Orozco
    Commented Jan 3, 2022 at 4:10
  • 1
    Good solution but this is incomplete, since it doesn't show how to use this to answer OP's question.
    – theberzi
    Commented Apr 10, 2023 at 17:05
19

Creating constraints can be an expensive operation on a table containing lots of data so I recommend not dropping constraints only to immediately create them again immediately after - you only want to create that thing once.

I chose to solve this using an anonymous code block, very similar to Mike Stankavich, however unlike Mike (who catches an error) I first check to see if the constraint exists:

DO $$
BEGIN
    IF NOT EXISTS ( SELECT  constraint_schema
                ,       constraint_name 
                FROM    information_schema.check_constraints 
                WHERE   constraint_schema = 'myschema'
                  AND   constraint_name = 'myconstraintname'
              )
    THEN
        ALTER TABLE myschema.mytable ADD CONSTRAINT myconstraintname CHECK (column <= 100);
    END IF;
END$$; 
3
  • @All - In my case, constraint are getting created from JPA and those names are not present constraint_schema
    – Prateek
    Commented Jul 10, 2019 at 8:55
  • 4
    I had to use information_schema.constraint_column_usage instead which gave me control over names I could read as well as the table name.
    – CTS_AE
    Commented Oct 23, 2019 at 1:35
  • I combined this with Pedro's answer and it worked great. I used pg_constraint to search since it did not exist in check_constraints when using ORM Light
    – Marquee
    Commented Oct 5, 2021 at 16:17
7

Take advantage of regclass to reduce verbosity, increase performance, and avoid errors related to table naming clashes between schemas:

DO $$ BEGIN
    IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT FROM pg_constraint 
                   WHERE conrelid = 'foo'::regclass AND conname = 'bar') THEN 
        ALTER TABLE foo ADD CONSTRAINT bar...;
    END IF;
END $$;

This will also work for tables in other schemas, e.g.:

DO $$ BEGIN
    IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT FROM pg_constraint 
                   WHERE conrelid = 's.foo'::regclass AND conname = 'bar') THEN 
        ALTER TABLE s.foo ADD CONSTRAINT bar...;
    END IF;
END $$;
6

Using information_schema.constraint_column_usage to check for the constraint doesn't work for foreign keys. I use pg_constraint to check for primary keys, foreign keys or unique constraints:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION add_constraint(t_name text, c_name text, constraint_sql text)
RETURNS void
AS $$
BEGIN
    IF NOT EXISTS(
            SELECT c.conname
            FROM pg_constraint AS c
            INNER JOIN pg_class AS t ON c.conrelid = t."oid"
            WHERE t.relname = t_name AND c.conname = c_name
    ) THEN

        EXECUTE 'ALTER TABLE ' || t_name || ' ADD CONSTRAINT ' || c_name || ' ' || constraint_sql;

    END IF;
END;
$$
LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Examples:

SELECT add_constraint('client_grant_system_scopes', 'client_grant_system_scopes_pk', 'PRIMARY KEY (client_grants_id, tenant, "scope");');

SELECT add_constraint('client_grant_system_scopes', 'client_grant_system_scopes_fk', 'FOREIGN KEY (tenant,"scope") REFERENCES system_scope(tenant,"scope") ON DELETE CASCADE;');

SELECT add_constraint('jwt_assertion_issuers', 'jwt_assertion_issuers_issuer_key', 'UNIQUE (issuer);');
1
  • pg_constraints worked for me where information_schema.check_constraints did not. Combined with jamiet's answer ftw. Thanks!
    – Marquee
    Commented Oct 5, 2021 at 16:18
4

In psql You can use metacommand \gexec for run generated query.

SELECT 'ALTER TABLE xx ADD CONSTRAINT abc' WHERE not EXISTS (SELECT True FROM pg_constraint WHERE conname = 'abc') \gexec

2

For me those solutions didn't work because the constraint was a primary key. This one worked for me:

ALTER TABLE <table.name> DROP CONSTRAINT  IF EXISTS <constraint.name> CASCADE;
-3

Considering all the above mentioned answers , the below approach help if you just want to check if a constraint exist in the table in which you are trying to insert and raise a notice if there happens to be one

DO 
$$ BEGIN
IF NOT EXISTS (select constraint_name 
               from information_schema.table_constraints 
               where table_schema='schame_name' and upper(table_name) = 
upper('table_name')  and upper(constraint_name) = upper('constraint_name'))

THEN

   ALTER TABLE TABLE_NAME ADD CONSTRAINT CONTRAINT_NAME..... ;

ELSE raise NOTICE 'Constraint CONTRAINT_NAME already exists in Table TABLE_NAME';   

END IF;
END
$$;
3
  • Do please tell what was the reason for down voting ?
    – charle819
    Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 6:21
  • 1
    I think the reason why it got down voted was because it looks exactly like Jamiet's answer. It does not add anything of value to already existing answers. Commented Oct 15, 2019 at 4:17
  • And it's answer another question, the OP wants to add constraint if not exists not check a constraint and raise an exception! Commented Mar 4 at 16:34
-5

Don't know why so many lines of code ?

-- SELECT "Column1", "Column2", "Column3" , count(star) FROM dbo."MyTable" GROUP BY "Column1" , "Column2" , "Column3" HAVING count(*) > 1;

alter table dbo."MyTable" drop constraint if exists "MyConstraint_Name" ;

ALTER TABLE dbo."MyTable" ADD CONSTRAINT "MyConstraint_Name" UNIQUE("Column1", "Column3", "Column2");

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