318

In the internet there are several places that show you how to get an IP address. And a lot of them look like this example:

String strHostName = string.Empty;
// Getting Ip address of local machine...
// First get the host name of local machine.
strHostName = Dns.GetHostName();
Console.WriteLine("Local Machine's Host Name: " + strHostName);
// Then using host name, get the IP address list..
IPHostEntry ipEntry = Dns.GetHostEntry(strHostName);
IPAddress[] addr = ipEntry.AddressList;

for (int i = 0; i < addr.Length; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine("IP Address {0}: {1} ", i, addr[i].ToString());
}
Console.ReadLine();

With this example I get several IP addresses, but I'm only interested in getting the one that the router assigns to the computer running the program: the IP that I would give to someone if he wishes to access a shared folder in my computer for instance.

If I am not connected to a network and I am connected to the internet directly via a modem with no router then I would like to get an error. How can I see if my computer is connected to a network with C# and if it is then to get the LAN IP address.

  • 1
    If I am not connected to a network and I am connected to the internet This statement seems contradictory. Are you trying to figure out if your computer is connected to a private LAN or the Internet? – Andy Jul 23 '11 at 20:28
  • 5
    Just as a warning: A computer can have more than one IP interface, for example a LAN and WiFi. If you bind a service to a particular piece of hardware (say the LAN), you need the IP of the LAN. Most of the following examples will return the "first" or "last" IP address found. If you have more than 2 IP address, your program may work 50% of the time, depending on the random order the OS returns the IP addresses. – Mark Lakata Jun 23 '14 at 23:46
  • @MarkLakata I thought of the same issue. The function in my answer below will handle it. You can specify which type of network interface you want the IP address from. – compman2408 Oct 13 '14 at 14:54
  • 3
    Just FTR, if you google here for Unity3D, it's Network.player.ipAddress in their API – Fattie Nov 21 '14 at 4:45
  • @MarkLakata strictly speaking, the "first" or "last" IP is the "correct" IP, as the browser may use any IP that is available. Likely a good correction should be to return every IP associated with the machine. – UncaAlby Feb 20 '17 at 23:34

25 Answers 25

469

To get local Ip Address:

public static string GetLocalIPAddress()
{
    var host = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());
    foreach (var ip in host.AddressList)
    {
        if (ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
        {
            return ip.ToString();
        }
    }
    throw new Exception("No network adapters with an IPv4 address in the system!");
}

To check if you're connected or not:

System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable();

| improve this answer | |
  • 30
    won't work if you use stuff like vm virtual box, genymotion, etc. – PauLEffect Oct 6 '14 at 3:03
  • 5
    Agree with PaulEffect. Not only this method is bad for multiple network card, but also, it's not differentiating between IP v6 and IP v4 addresses. – Max Jan 9 '15 at 22:30
  • 18
    @John AddressFamily.InterNetwork is IP v4 and AddressFamily.InterNetworkV6 is IP v6 – Leonardo Xavier Jun 23 '15 at 12:42
  • I'm Using Geraldo H Answer, but if anyone is using this, you may want to remove all ips that ends with 1, so it will remove loopback and virtualbox/vmware default ips – Leonardo Xavier Jun 23 '15 at 13:03
  • 7
    It seems you're using VMWare or other virtualization software. The OP did not ask for that, so I think down voting due to that is a bit harsh. If you have VMWare or multiple NICs, some of the other answers already provide clues to that. – Mrchief May 31 '16 at 17:32
227

There is a more accurate way when there are multi ip addresses available on local machine. Connect a UDP socket and read its local endpoint:

string localIP;
using (Socket socket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Dgram, 0))
{
    socket.Connect("8.8.8.8", 65530);
    IPEndPoint endPoint = socket.LocalEndPoint as IPEndPoint;
    localIP = endPoint.Address.ToString();
}

Connect on a UDP socket has the following effect: it sets the destination for Send/Recv, discards all packets from other addresses, and - which is what we use - transfers the socket into "connected" state, settings its appropriate fields. This includes checking the existence of the route to the destination according to the system's routing table and setting the local endpoint accordingly. The last part seems to be undocumented officially but it looks like an integral trait of Berkeley sockets API (a side effect of UDP "connected" state) that works reliably in both Windows and Linux across versions and distributions.

So, this method will give the local address that would be used to connect to the specified remote host. There is no real connection established, hence the specified remote ip can be unreachable.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    This is the best solution that worked for my needs. In my situation I have many networks card and a few wireless connections. I needed to get the preferred IP address depending on which connection was activated. – David Nov 1 '15 at 22:57
  • 12
    Without a network connection--you have no IP address, anyhow. Therefore, the code still holds as valid, though it would be prudent to add a try..catch in order to handle such a situation, and return something like "127.0.0.1" if a SocketException were thrown. – Russ Sep 1 '16 at 13:38
  • 3
    @PatrickSteele, yep, it returns the preferred outbound ip address for the specific target. if you want to obtain your LAN ip address, try to indicate the target to be some ip from your LAN – Mr.Wang from Next Door Jan 29 '17 at 6:30
  • 2
    This method works on a mac with dotnet core, whereas the the accepted answer currently does not. – Pellet Dec 7 '17 at 6:09
  • 9
    This solution works about 4 times faster than the accepted answer (by Mrchief). This should be the real answer – Kamarey Sep 27 '18 at 10:41
117

Refactoring Mrcheif's code to leverage Linq (ie. .Net 3.0+). .

private IPAddress LocalIPAddress()
{
    if (!System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable())
    {
        return null;
    }

    IPHostEntry host = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());

    return host
        .AddressList
        .FirstOrDefault(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork);
}

:)

| improve this answer | |
  • I've got a few IP Addresses as "Inter Network" an this solution actually works and gives the right one back. The other one from Mrchief just gives me the last one. So actually this one should be the right one ;) – Keenora Fluffball Dec 22 '11 at 12:23
  • 28
    @KeenoraFluffball - this one gives you the first one, whereas this one gives you the last one (or vice versa, depends how the list is constructed). Either way, neither is right - if there are more than 1 IP address given to you, you need to know which network you're using. Guessing by taking the first or last is not the correct solution. – gbjbaanb Sep 4 '13 at 9:11
  • May want to also include AddressFamily.InterNetworkV6 – joelsand Mar 19 '19 at 18:41
  • the return of null if the network is not available is not useful if you have to handle standalone PCs as well. I replaced it with "return IPAddress.Loopback;" which corresponds to the special IP number 127.0.0.1. – Christian Nov 22 '19 at 14:10
114

I know this may be kicking a dead horse, but maybe this can help someone. I have looked all over the place for a way to find my local IP address, but everywhere I find it says to use:

Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());

I don't like this at all because it just gets all the addresses assigned to your computer. If you have multiple network interfaces (which pretty much all computers do now-a-days) you have no idea which address goes with which network interface. After doing a bunch of research I created a function to use the NetworkInterface class and yank the information out of it. This way I can tell what type of interface it is (Ethernet, wireless, loopback, tunnel, etc.), whether it is active or not, and SOOO much more.

public string GetLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType _type)
{
    string output = "";
    foreach (NetworkInterface item in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces())
    {
        if (item.NetworkInterfaceType == _type && item.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up)
        {
            foreach (UnicastIPAddressInformation ip in item.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses)
            {
                if (ip.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
                {
                    output = ip.Address.ToString();
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return output;
}

Now to get the IPv4 address of your Ethernet network interface call:

GetLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType.Ethernet);

Or your Wireless interface:

GetLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType.Wireless80211);

If you try to get an IPv4 address for a wireless interface, but your computer doesn't have a wireless card installed it will just return an empty string. Same thing with the Ethernet interface.

Hope this helps someone! :-)

EDIT:

It was pointed out (thanks @NasBanov) that even though this function goes about extracting the IP address in a much better way than using Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()) it doesn't do very well at supporting multiple interfaces of the same type or multiple IP addresses on a single interface. It will only return a single IP address when there may be multiple addresses assigned. To return ALL of these assigned addresses you could simply manipulate the original function to always return an array instead of a single string. For example:

public static string[] GetAllLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType _type)
{
    List<string> ipAddrList = new List<string>();
    foreach (NetworkInterface item in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces())
    {
        if (item.NetworkInterfaceType == _type && item.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up)
        {
            foreach (UnicastIPAddressInformation ip in item.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses)
            {
                if (ip.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
                {
                    ipAddrList.Add(ip.Address.ToString());
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return ipAddrList.ToArray();
}

Now this function will return ALL assigned addresses for a specific interface type. Now to get just a single string, you could use the .FirstOrDefault() extension to return the first item in the array or, if it's empty, return an empty string.

GetLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType.Ethernet).FirstOrDefault();
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    This is a better solution because there is no DNS usability in lots of places and interfaces can have multiple ip addresses. I also utilise a similar method. – Mert Gülsoy Oct 21 '14 at 15:32
  • The issue with this is that you only return 1 IP address per interface... the last IP, foreach. – Nas Banov Mar 2 '16 at 22:52
  • @compman2408 - not true, a single interface can have multiple IPs, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multihoming#Variants for all the combos. Obvious example is when running both IPv4 and IPv6, but in the past i have had single ethernet adapter participate in multiple IPv4 networks. Unusual maybe - yet perfectly legal. E.g. for Windows see windowsnetworking.com/articles-tutorials/windows-2003/… – Nas Banov Mar 4 '16 at 18:44
  • @NasBanov This function is only set up to get IPv4 addresses so I'm not even going to talk about IPv6 and its current uselessness. I'm aware of multihoming as connecting to multiple networks on multiple interfaces however have never heard of connecting to multiple networks on the same interface. Even though it seems you're correct that it is actually possible, the <1% of people using their NIC that way would just have to change the function to return an array instead. – compman2408 Mar 5 '16 at 7:37
  • 1
    Thank you for this. FYI, at least on .NET 3.5 mono on OSX item.OperationalStatus always returns Unknown. – gman May 31 '16 at 8:43
38

Here is a modified version (from compman2408's one) which worked for me:

    internal static string GetLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType _type)
    {  // Checks your IP adress from the local network connected to a gateway. This to avoid issues with double network cards
        string output = "";  // default output
        foreach (NetworkInterface item in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces()) // Iterate over each network interface
        {  // Find the network interface which has been provided in the arguments, break the loop if found
            if (item.NetworkInterfaceType == _type && item.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up)
            {   // Fetch the properties of this adapter
                IPInterfaceProperties adapterProperties = item.GetIPProperties();
                // Check if the gateway adress exist, if not its most likley a virtual network or smth
                if (adapterProperties.GatewayAddresses.FirstOrDefault() != null)
                {   // Iterate over each available unicast adresses
                    foreach (UnicastIPAddressInformation ip in adapterProperties.UnicastAddresses)
                    {   // If the IP is a local IPv4 adress
                        if (ip.Address.AddressFamily == System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
                        {   // we got a match!
                            output = ip.Address.ToString();
                            break;  // break the loop!!
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            // Check if we got a result if so break this method
            if (output != "") { break; }
        }
        // Return results
        return output;
    }

You can call this method for example like:

GetLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType.Ethernet);

The change: I'm retrieving the IP from an adapter which has a gateway IP assigned to it. Second change: I've added docstrings and break statement to make this method more efficient.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Clever solution. I'm now using this. – RQDQ Aug 20 '15 at 15:42
  • 4
    Has the same issue like the code it was derived from: it just returns one of the IPs, a random IP from many - which does not have to be the one you need. It earns the ademiller.com/blogs/tech/2008/06/it-works-on-my-machine-award – Nas Banov Mar 5 '16 at 21:14
  • 1
    @NasBanov, Sure I did earn it, as I'm stating in my post: "which worked for me". :-) – Gerardo H Apr 21 '16 at 16:40
  • This is the way to go, thank you for this. When you have loop back switches for emulators installed, all the other variants fail while this one succeeds! – DiamondDrake Aug 27 '16 at 16:02
  • 1
    Why do you only return the last ip-address you have found, not the first? A simpel break in the most inner if or a return would do the trick. – Martin Mulder May 10 '17 at 9:23
23

This is the best code I found to get the current IP, avoiding get VMWare host or other invalid IP address.

public string GetLocalIpAddress()
{
    UnicastIPAddressInformation mostSuitableIp = null;

    var networkInterfaces = NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces();

    foreach (var network in networkInterfaces)
    {
        if (network.OperationalStatus != OperationalStatus.Up)
            continue;

        var properties = network.GetIPProperties();

        if (properties.GatewayAddresses.Count == 0)
            continue;

        foreach (var address in properties.UnicastAddresses)
        {
            if (address.Address.AddressFamily != AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
                continue;

            if (IPAddress.IsLoopback(address.Address))
                continue;

            if (!address.IsDnsEligible)
            {
                if (mostSuitableIp == null)
                    mostSuitableIp = address;
                continue;
            }

            // The best IP is the IP got from DHCP server
            if (address.PrefixOrigin != PrefixOrigin.Dhcp)
            {
                if (mostSuitableIp == null || !mostSuitableIp.IsDnsEligible)
                    mostSuitableIp = address;
                continue;
            }

            return address.Address.ToString();
        }
    }

    return mostSuitableIp != null 
        ? mostSuitableIp.Address.ToString()
        : "";
}
| improve this answer | |
  • You should probably explain, why this code is the solution for the answer. Can you actually get an answer on the question if you're connected to the internet and does this result in an error? – Philipp M Nov 10 '16 at 13:52
  • The other ways does not use IsDnsEligible and PrefixOrigin validation. – rodcesar.santos Dec 5 '16 at 11:50
  • @PhilippM If address is not a DNS Eligible, it is a reserved internal IP. It is not the internet provider host. And if PrefixOrigin was suplied by a DHCP server, possible this is the best address choice. This is the unique function that works to me! – rodcesar.santos Dec 5 '16 at 11:57
  • 1
    @user1551843 - that was great, thanks. I was using the old depreciated GetHostByName method but it was returning the IP of a VMWare adapter :) – Jason Newland Jan 15 '17 at 3:04
  • This was the only solution that worked for me on vpn + wireless. Thank you. – jay-danger Nov 2 '18 at 21:02
13

I think using LinQ is easier:

Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName())
   .AddressList
   .First(x => x.AddressFamily == System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
   .ToString()
| improve this answer | |
  • 14
    That's not LINQ, that's extension methods and lambdas. There's a difference. – Mark Nov 19 '14 at 16:55
  • 11
    @Mark - If you don't add "using System.Linq;" you can't use the "First" extension method though – BornToCode Feb 8 '15 at 12:38
  • 5
    That's because the extension method are in the Enumerable class which is in the System.Linq namespace. It's still not LINQ. – Mark Feb 8 '15 at 15:14
  • 21
    Mark, even in this short form, the statement is indeed using LINQ-to-objects presented with method(lambda) syntax. Query syntax is simply syntactic sugar that gets compiled to a chain of IEnumerable extension method calls, which is what LINQ-to-objects is. Sources: authored a LINQ-to-SQL provider and a series of articles on the subject. – constantine g Aug 2 '16 at 2:59
  • 1
    Method Syntax is still LINQ.. – rsenna Jan 20 at 8:39
10

For a laugh, thought I'd try and get a single LINQ statement by using the new C# 6 null-conditional operator. Looks pretty crazy and probably horribly inefficient, but it works.

private string GetLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType type = NetworkInterfaceType.Ethernet)
{
    // Bastardized from: http://stackoverflow.com/a/28621250/2685650.

    return NetworkInterface
        .GetAllNetworkInterfaces()
        .FirstOrDefault(ni =>
            ni.NetworkInterfaceType == type
            && ni.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up
            && ni.GetIPProperties().GatewayAddresses.FirstOrDefault() != null
            && ni.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses.FirstOrDefault(ip => ip.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork) != null
        )
        ?.GetIPProperties()
        .UnicastAddresses
        .FirstOrDefault(ip => ip.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
        ?.Address
        ?.ToString()
        ?? string.Empty;
}

Logic courtesy of Gerardo H (and by reference compman2408).

| improve this answer | |
  • Definitely fun (+1), but actually does not need to be inefficient at all. Reminds me of programming in LISP or Forth :-) – Roland Oct 16 '19 at 14:52
  • So .. not what I would write. This sort of odd "?." chained LINQ-to-Objects can be rewritten (or "fixed") when using Select/SelectMany (SelectMany can increase or reduce the length) to do transforms, such that the final form is IEnumeable<string> so that "FirstOrDefault() ?? string.Empty" is sufficient. – user2864740 Jul 31 at 17:44
  • I'm not sure you can argue the null conditional operator is "odd", but sure I take it this code is (as I said) "pretty crazy". – Stajs Aug 1 at 21:45
8

Other way to get IP using linq expression:

public static List<string> GetAllLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType type)
{
    return NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces()
                   .Where(x => x.NetworkInterfaceType == type && x.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up)
                   .SelectMany(x => x.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses)
                   .Where(x => x.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
                   .Select(x => x.Address.ToString())
                   .ToList();
}
| improve this answer | |
7

@mrcheif I found this answer today and it was very useful although it did return a wrong IP (not due to the code not working) but it gave the wrong internetwork IP when you have such things as Himachi running.

public static string localIPAddress()
{
    IPHostEntry host;
    string localIP = "";
    host = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());

    foreach (IPAddress ip in host.AddressList)
    {
        localIP = ip.ToString();

        string[] temp = localIP.Split('.');

        if (ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork && temp[0] == "192")
        {
            break;
        }
        else
        {
            localIP = null;
        }
    }

    return localIP;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Do you mean Logmein Hamachi? It is a VPN solution and it tinkers with the network stack. Also, being a VPN, it seems reasonable that it returns the VPN assigned IP when connected (just my guess). – Mrchief Jan 28 '13 at 22:17
  • 2
    Completely Unreliable. Not only is 192.0.0.0/8 not a correct test for a private IP address (there are 3 ranges, all different from this one), it can be well be a corporate network range, so not so much "local". – ivan_pozdeev Oct 17 '17 at 19:47
6

Tested with one or multiple LAN cards and Virtual machines

public static string DisplayIPAddresses()
    {
        string returnAddress = String.Empty;

        // Get a list of all network interfaces (usually one per network card, dialup, and VPN connection)
        NetworkInterface[] networkInterfaces = NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces();

        foreach (NetworkInterface network in networkInterfaces)
        {
            // Read the IP configuration for each network
            IPInterfaceProperties properties = network.GetIPProperties();

            if (network.NetworkInterfaceType == NetworkInterfaceType.Ethernet &&
                   network.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up &&
                   !network.Description.ToLower().Contains("virtual") &&
                   !network.Description.ToLower().Contains("pseudo"))
            {
                // Each network interface may have multiple IP addresses
                foreach (IPAddressInformation address in properties.UnicastAddresses)
                {
                    // We're only interested in IPv4 addresses for now
                    if (address.Address.AddressFamily != AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
                        continue;

                    // Ignore loopback addresses (e.g., 127.0.0.1)
                    if (IPAddress.IsLoopback(address.Address))
                        continue;

                    returnAddress = address.Address.ToString();
                    Console.WriteLine(address.Address.ToString() + " (" + network.Name + " - " + network.Description + ")");
                }
            }
        }

       return returnAddress;
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • Keep in mind that this one is working for Ethernet only. Remove NetworkInterfaceType restriction to support wi-fi. – scor4er Aug 6 '19 at 19:07
4

Just an updated version of mine using LINQ:

/// <summary>
/// Gets the local Ipv4.
/// </summary>
/// <returns>The local Ipv4.</returns>
/// <param name="networkInterfaceType">Network interface type.</param>
IPAddress GetLocalIPv4(NetworkInterfaceType networkInterfaceType)
{
    var networkInterfaces = NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces().Where(i => i.NetworkInterfaceType == networkInterfaceType && i.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up);

    foreach (var networkInterface in networkInterfaces)
    {
        var adapterProperties = networkInterface.GetIPProperties();

        if (adapterProperties.GatewayAddresses.FirstOrDefault() == null)
                continue;
        foreach (var ip in networkInterface.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses)
        {
            if (ip.Address.AddressFamily != AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
                    continue;

            return ip.Address;
        }
    }

    return null;
}
| improve this answer | |
3

Pre requisites: you have to add System.Data.Linq reference and refer it

using System.Linq;
string ipAddress ="";
IPHostEntry ipHostInfo = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());
ipAddress = Convert.ToString(ipHostInfo.AddressList.FirstOrDefault(address => address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork));
| improve this answer | |
3

I also was struggling with obtaining the correct IP.

I tried a variety of the solutions here but none provided me the desired affect. Almost all of the conditional tests that was provided caused no address to be used.

This is what worked for me, hope it helps...

var firstAddress = (from address in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces().Select(x => x.GetIPProperties()).SelectMany(x => x.UnicastAddresses).Select(x => x.Address)
                    where !IPAddress.IsLoopback(address) && address.AddressFamily == System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily.InterNetwork
                    select address).FirstOrDefault();

Console.WriteLine(firstAddress);
| improve this answer | |
1
string str="";

System.Net.Dns.GetHostName();

IPHostEntry ipEntry = System.Net.Dns.GetHostEntry(str);

IPAddress[] addr = ipEntry.AddressList;

string IP="Your Ip Address Is :->"+ addr[addr.Length - 1].ToString();
| improve this answer | |
  • str is always empty – aj.toulan Sep 9 '19 at 15:30
1

Keep in mind, in the general case you could have multiple NAT translations going on, and multiple dns servers, each operating on different NAT translation levels.

What if you have carrier grade NAT, and want to communicate with other customers of the same carrier? In the general case you never know for sure because you might appear with different host names at every NAT translation.

| improve this answer | |
1

Obsolete gone, this works to me

public static IPAddress GetIPAddress()
{ 
 IPAddress ip = Dns.GetHostAddresses(Dns.GetHostName()).Where(address => 
 address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork).First();
 return ip;
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Updating Mrchief's answer with Linq, we will have:

public static IPAddress GetLocalIPAddress()
{
   var host = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());
   var ipAddress= host.AddressList.FirstOrDefault(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork);
   return ipAddress;
}
| improve this answer | |
1

This returns addresses from any interfaces that have gateway addresses and unicast addresses in two separate lists, IPV4 and IPV6.

public static (List<IPAddress> V4, List<IPAddress> V6) GetLocal()
{
    List<IPAddress> foundV4 = new List<IPAddress>();
    List<IPAddress> foundV6 = new List<IPAddress>();

    NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces().ToList().ForEach(ni =>
    {
        if (ni.GetIPProperties().GatewayAddresses.FirstOrDefault() != null)
        {
            ni.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses.ToList().ForEach(ua =>
            {
                if (ua.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork) foundV4.Add(ua.Address);
                if (ua.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetworkV6) foundV6.Add(ua.Address);
            });
        }
    });

    return (foundV4.Distinct().ToList(), foundV6.Distinct().ToList());
}
| improve this answer | |
0

In addition just simple code for getting Client Ip:

        public static string getclientIP()
        {
            var HostIP = HttpContext.Current != null ? HttpContext.Current.Request.UserHostAddress : "";
            return HostIP;
        }

Hope it's help you.

| improve this answer | |
0

Modified compman2408's code to be able to iterate through each NetworkInterfaceType.

public static string GetLocalIPv4 (NetworkInterfaceType _type) {
    string output = null;
    foreach (NetworkInterface item in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces ()) {
        if (item.NetworkInterfaceType == _type && item.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up) {
            foreach (UnicastIPAddressInformation ip in item.GetIPProperties ().UnicastAddresses) {
                if (ip.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork) {
                    output = ip.Address.ToString ();
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return output;
}

And you can call it like so:

static void Main (string[] args) {
    // Get all possible enum values:
    var nitVals = Enum.GetValues (typeof (NetworkInterfaceType)).Cast<NetworkInterfaceType> ();

    foreach (var nitVal in nitVals) {
        Console.WriteLine ($"{nitVal} => {GetLocalIPv4 (nitVal) ?? "NULL"}");
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0
Imports System.Net
Imports System.Net.Sockets
Function LocalIP()
    Dim strHostName = Dns.GetHostName
    Dim Host = Dns.GetHostEntry(strHostName)
    For Each ip In Host.AddressList
        If ip.AddressFamily = AddressFamily.InterNetwork Then
            txtIP.Text = ip.ToString
        End If
    Next

    Return True
End Function

Below same action

Function LocalIP()

Dim Host As String =Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName).AddressList(1).MapToIPv4.ToString

txtIP.Text = Host

Return True

End Function

| improve this answer | |
  • Below example is same action Function LocalIP() Dim Host As String = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName).AddressList(1).MapToIPv4.ToString txtIP.Text = Host Return True End Function – YongJae Kim May 23 at 7:16
-1

There is already many of answer, but I m still contributing mine one:

public static IPAddress LocalIpAddress() {
    Func<IPAddress, bool> localIpPredicate = ip =>
        ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork &&
        ip.ToString().StartsWith("192.168"); //check only for 16-bit block
    return Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList.LastOrDefault(localIpPredicate);
}

One liner:

public static IPAddress LocalIpAddress() => Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList.LastOrDefault(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork && ip.ToString().StartsWith("192.168"));

note: Search from last because it still worked after some interfaces added into device, such as MobileHotspot,VPN or other fancy virtual adapters.

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  • 2
    So if my local IP is 10.0.2.3 it's not found? That's really weird in this code. – frankhommers Oct 31 '19 at 11:21
  • @frankhommers been said check only for 16-bit block – nyconing Nov 1 '19 at 3:44
  • 2
    16 bits blocks can also be something else than 192.168 – frankhommers Nov 1 '19 at 8:37
-1
Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[1].MapToIPv4() //returns 192.168.14.1

enter image description here

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  • 5
    Your answer should contain a description of how it works for the case of OP and also for future readers. – Ronak Dhoot Mar 8 at 11:51
  • It's better to include an explanation of your answer for future readers. – Nicolas Gervais Mar 8 at 15:01
  • It may throw an OutOfRangeException in some cases. – Jinjinov Jul 29 at 9:25
-2
Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[1]

one line of code :D

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  • 8
    It may throw an OutOfRangeException in some cases. – Loudenvier Jun 26 '14 at 16:35
  • 6
    Also, how do you know which one you want? What's right for you might be wrong for someone else. – Mark Nov 19 '14 at 16:54

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