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Something I noticed in build.gradle when I use android studio canary.

What exactly is its intended use?

kotlinOptions.useIR = true 
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2 Answers 2

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This is an option for the Kotlin compiler which is mostly useful if you plan on going multiplatform. Earlier this year the new Kotlin Compiler was announced to be stable and that was ready for use. See this post

Now, what's IR?

Compilers usually have mainly two components:

  • A frontend
  • A backend

A compiler frontend takes care to check your program is valid and makes sense by performing some syntactic and grammatic validation.

After the frontend is sure the program you've written is correct it proceeds to generate things like a derived syntax tree from your source files.

There's some discussion whether the task I'm about to describe is performed by a the frontend or a third module called a "middle-end".

Besides these data-structures, compiler frontends (or middleends), can also output something called IR which stands for (Intermediate Representation or Internal Representation) which basically is a simplified (using less complex instructions) version of your program.

This intermediate representation is later taken by the compiler backend to generate target code:

  • The Kotlin/JS backend outputs JavaScript code
  • The Kotlin/Native backend outputs llvm code
  • The Kotlin/JVM backend outputs Java byte code

Here's a diagram

enter image description here

Forgot to add it into the diagram but the last three boxes are all compiler backends

Now; with all this chatter:

What does the useIR option do? Essentially use the intermediate representation to generate the target code for your platform

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    And what are the benefits for the user? Performance boost ?
    – Andrew
    Commented Jun 20, 2021 at 21:34
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    Depends on the inner workings of the new versions of the compiler. Since it's the new version and what's going to be maintained I'd say that yes you're going to get new features and optimizations as the Kotlin teams add them. The main feature you're getting out of it is that the same codebase can be transpiled into whatever target you want (js, jvm, native) Commented Jun 21, 2021 at 6:47
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    Actually is no more actual. "Since Kotlin 1.5.0, JVM IR is the default backend, so useIR = true no longer has any effect. We should deprecate this option in 1.5 and remove it in a future release." - youtrack.jetbrains.com/issue/KT-45504
    – Vladimir
    Commented Aug 4, 2022 at 11:50
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IR which stands for (Intermediate Representation or Internal Representation) which basically is a simplified (using less complex instructions) version of your program.

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