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Alright, I thought I understood python pretty well, but clearly there is a big gap in my understanding of nested lists and their indexing.

Imagine we create a "matrix" (nested lists, where each list represent a row) filled with say 0. I want to iterate over each row and column and set that item. This task would be better done with numpy arrays, but stay with me for now.

a = [[0]*4]*4
print(a)
# prints [[0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0]]

a[0][0] = 10
print(a)
# prints [[10, 0, 0, 0], [10, 0, 0, 0], [10, 0, 0, 0], [10, 0, 0, 0]]

Why has the first element in each inner list (row) been set to 10? I expected the first element in the first list to be 10.

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    It might be because of the way you are setting the matrix, try setting it as you would like to be in a none-pythonic way like: a=[[0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0]] and check if the problem still accures. (Not that I can explain why if it doesn't) Jun 19 at 19:16
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This is because each list you see all refer to the same object in memory. Using *4 is generally discouraged for mutable objects for precisely this reason. Using this code will get you the behavior you expect

a = [[0 for j in range(4)] for i in range(4)]
print(a)
# prints [[0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0]]

a[0][0] = 10
print(a)
# prints [[10, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0]]
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    Thank you! I didn't realize using *4 would create copies referencing the same chunk of memory! Jun 19 at 19:18

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