0

I am quite new to python and trying some features. I searched a lot in here for a possible solution with no success. This is my issue:

Goal:

  • read a column with date and time from an .xlsx file --> works

  • get this column in a numpy array --> works

  • The array item is read from the .xlsx as an Object

The array output looks like this:

['2020-11-09 20:30:59' '2020-11-08 09:22:54' '2020-11-04 02:24:17' ...
 '1900-01-27 02:30:00' '1900-01-24 03:00:00' '1900-01-18 15:30:00']
  • convert the date and time to a float --> does not work

I tried the following:

x[:, 0] = [np.datetime64(x[:, 0])]

--> this doesn't work; so I tried to convert to String before.

x[:, 0] = [np.datetime64(str(x[:, 0]))] 

--> This does also not work with this error message:

ValueError: Error parsing datetime string "['2020-11-09 20:30:59' '2020-11-08 09:22:54' '2020-11-04 02:24:17' ...
 '1900-01-27 02:30:00' '1900-01-24 03:00:00' '1900-01-18 15:30:00']" at position 0

So where is the issue?

Thanks a lot for the answer! It seems to work with the datetime64 conversion. I did change .

np.array(alist, 'datetime64[ms]')

to

np.array(alist, 'datetime64[ns]')

By that I get the datetime64 as an integer. Nevertheless, how comes that I get negative values for the early datesas seen in the output?

-----------------------------------------------------
--> Before conversion: ['2020-11-09 20:30:59' '2020-11-08 09:22:54' '2020-11-04 02:24:17' ...
 '1900-01-27 02:30:00' '1900-01-24 03:00:00' '1900-01-18 15:30:00']
-----------------------------------------------------
--> After conversion to dt64: [1604953859000000000 1604827374000000000 1604456657000000000 ...      
 -2206733400000000000 -2206990800000000000 -2207464200000000000]
-----------------------------------------------------
4
  • 1
    If you wanna change the dtype to datetime you can use x.astype('datetime64[ms]’)
    – Nk03
    Jun 19 at 19:21
  • The first "doesn't work" errors lack details - actual code and error message. The error in the last case should be clear. str(x[:,0]) is everything between "", the brackets, spaces and '' strings.
    – hpaulj
    Jun 19 at 20:11
  • I want to use the date and time as float in a machine learning model, so I need to convert to float and later on cpnvert back to date and time.
    – rookieOC
    Jun 19 at 22:16
  • 1
    the point is: if you convert to integer, you get Unix time which is relative time to 1970-01-01 (the "Unix time epoch"), so values before that date will be negative.
    – MrFuppes
    Jun 21 at 7:02
1

I was going to say that datatime64 can be picky when converting strings. It can't handle every kind of delimiter. But

In [219]: alist = ['2020-11-09 20:30:59', '2020-11-08 09:22:54', '2020-11-04 02:24:17',
     ...:  '1900-01-27 02:30:00', '1900-01-24 03:00:00', '1900-01-18 15:30:00']
In [220]: alist
Out[220]: 
['2020-11-09 20:30:59',
 '2020-11-08 09:22:54',
 '2020-11-04 02:24:17',
 '1900-01-27 02:30:00',
 '1900-01-24 03:00:00',
 '1900-01-18 15:30:00']

it handles this format just fine:

In [221]: np.array(alist, 'datetime64[ms]')
Out[221]: 
array(['2020-11-09T20:30:59.000', '2020-11-08T09:22:54.000',
       '2020-11-04T02:24:17.000', '1900-01-27T02:30:00.000',
       '1900-01-24T03:00:00.000', '1900-01-18T15:30:00.000'],
      dtype='datetime64[ms]')

This display has a 'T' between date and time, but its lack is not a problem.

converted back to a list, it produces datatime objects:

In [222]: _.tolist()
Out[222]: 
[datetime.datetime(2020, 11, 9, 20, 30, 59),
 datetime.datetime(2020, 11, 8, 9, 22, 54),
 datetime.datetime(2020, 11, 4, 2, 24, 17),
 datetime.datetime(1900, 1, 27, 2, 30),
 datetime.datetime(1900, 1, 24, 3, 0),
 datetime.datetime(1900, 1, 18, 15, 30)]

Or just displaying seconds

In [223]: np.array(alist, 'datetime64[s]')
Out[223]: 
array(['2020-11-09T20:30:59', '2020-11-08T09:22:54',
       '2020-11-04T02:24:17', '1900-01-27T02:30:00',
       '1900-01-24T03:00:00', '1900-01-18T15:30:00'],
      dtype='datetime64[s]')

Parsing a single datatime string

In [235]: alist[0]
Out[235]: '2020-11-09 20:30:59'
In [236]: np.datetime64(alist[0])
Out[236]: numpy.datetime64('2020-11-09T20:30:59')

If it's an object dtype array (such as one might get from a dataframe):

In [254]: arr = np.array(alist, object)
In [255]: arr
Out[255]: 
array(['2020-11-09 20:30:59', '2020-11-08 09:22:54',
       '2020-11-04 02:24:17', '1900-01-27 02:30:00',
       '1900-01-24 03:00:00', '1900-01-18 15:30:00'], dtype=object)
In [256]: arr1 = arr.astype('datetime64[s]')
In [257]: arr1
Out[257]: 
array(['2020-11-09T20:30:59', '2020-11-08T09:22:54',
       '2020-11-04T02:24:17', '1900-01-27T02:30:00',
       '1900-01-24T03:00:00', '1900-01-18T15:30:00'],
      dtype='datetime64[s]')
1
  • Thanks a lot! It seems to work. I did change . Nevertheless, how comes that I get negative values for the early dates?
    – rookieOC
    Jun 20 at 10:02
1

TLDR:

use astype for conversion to appropriate types:

import numpy as np

# array of dtype object (string)
arr = np.array(['2020-11-09 20:30:59', '2020-11-08 09:22:54', '2020-11-04 02:24:17',
                '1900-01-27 02:30:00', '1900-01-24 03:00:00', '1900-01-18 15:30:00'])

# to numpy's datetime, uses 'datetime64[s]' automatically
dtarr = arr.astype(np.datetime64)
# dtarr.dtype
# dtype('<M8[s]')

# to Unix time, using 1970-01-01 as epoch - values before the epoch are negative
dtarr_unix = dtarr.astype(np.int64) # datetime64[s] will give seconds since the epoch...
# array([ 1604953859,  1604827374,  1604456657, -2206733400, -2206990800,
#         -2207464200], dtype=int64)

# or using 1900-01-01 as epoch:
dtarr_1900 = (dtarr - np.datetime64('1900-01-01')).astype(np.int64)
# array([3813942659, 3813816174, 3813445457,    2255400,    1998000,
#           1524600], dtype=int64)

related: How to get unix timestamp from numpy.datetime64

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.