171

Currently I am having the following MySQL table: Employees (empID, empName, department);

I want to change the table to the following: Employees (empID, department, empName);

How can this be done using ALTER statements?

Note: I want to change only column positions.

  • May I ask why? The column order is pretty much just an esthetic problem... – deceze Jul 24 '11 at 7:08
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    @deceze perhaps not -- it defines the order of values in a SELECT * statement. (Granted, if the order of values is important, one should list them explicitly in the statement, but perhaps OP doesn't have total control here.) – Ted Hopp Jul 24 '11 at 7:12
  • I know it does not affect anything. My original table is having many columns so I just added 3 columns which are added in the last. But I want them to display at positions 3-4-5 to ease the use of SELECT statement – Sumit Gupta Jul 24 '11 at 7:16
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    @iSumitG: Also note that the AFTER column can be used with ALTER TABLE ADD column as well. (for next time you add some fields.) – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jul 24 '11 at 7:40
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    If loading a mysql dump, it uses insert into values. So if you for instance, you're loading data from prod into dev and the columns are out of order, you'll get an error. That's why one might want to do this. – Hooray Im Helping May 15 '13 at 17:48
290

If empName is a VARCHAR(50) column:

ALTER TABLE Employees MODIFY COLUMN empName VARCHAR(50) AFTER department;

EDIT

Per the comments, you can also do this:

ALTER TABLE Employees CHANGE COLUMN empName empName VARCHAR(50) AFTER department;

Note that the repetition of empName is deliberate. You have to tell MySQL that you want to keep the same column name.

You should be aware that both syntax versions are specific to MySQL. They won't work, for example, in PostgreSQL or many other DBMSs.

Another edit: As pointed out by @Luis Rossi in a comment, you need to completely specify the altered column definition just before the AFTER modifier. The above examples just have VARCHAR(50), but if you need other characteristics (such as NOT NULL or a default value) you need to include those as well. Consult the docs on ALTER TABLE for more info.

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    Just a note: MODIFY is not supported until version 4. – Erre Efe Jul 24 '11 at 7:09
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    Well, CHANGE COLUMN works perfectly well for this as well. – Ted Hopp Jul 24 '11 at 7:13
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    You need to repeat the column name, because the syntax assumes you may want to change the column name. Eg: ALTER TABLE Employees CHANGE COLUMN empName empName varchar(50) AFTER department; – brianjcohen Nov 14 '12 at 16:30
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    i found that this command work fine without the COLUMN key. – Saleh Enam Shohag Mar 29 '16 at 10:37
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    @SalehEnamShohag - Yes, according to the docs, the COLUMN keyword is optional in ALTER TABLE statements. I prefer to use it because I think it makes the statement more readable. – Ted Hopp Mar 29 '16 at 14:22
60

Change column position:

ALTER TABLE Employees 
   CHANGE empName empName VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL AFTER department;

If you need to move it to the first position you have to use term FIRST at the end of ALTER TABLE CHANGE [COLUMN] query:

ALTER TABLE UserOrder 
   CHANGE order_id order_id INT(11) NOT NULL FIRST;
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    Mentioning how to move it to first position was quite usefull – Tristian Jul 10 '13 at 0:22
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    Any idea how this would perform on a large table? Is it just changing some metadata, or does it actually have to reorganize data on the disk? – Kip Nov 12 '15 at 16:01
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    nevermind, answered my own question by trying it on a table i had with 3.9M rows, it took about 2 minutes. so it is definitely doing more than just swapping some metadata. – Kip Nov 12 '15 at 16:16
10

phpMyAdmin provides a GUI for this within the structure view of a table. Check to select the column you want to move and click the change action at the bottom of the column list. You can then change all of the column properties and you'll find the 'move column' function at the far right of the screen.

Of course this is all just building the queries in the perfectly good top answer but GUI fans might appreciate the alternative.

my phpMyAdmin version is 4.1.7

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    I don't know why this was -1, the answer is valid. It may not be what the OP's looking for, but it may helps others, +1 back to 0! – Magictallguy Dec 29 '14 at 17:34
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    The question asks specifically "How can this be done using ALTER statements". Not everyone running MySQL uses phpMyAdmin. – Caleb Mar 5 '15 at 0:26
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    I learn much of what I do nowadays at a command line from observing the query output from GUI tools like phpMyAdmin. I'm happy for this post to get as many downvotes as ppl see fit on this basis: 1 person will see this, get their job done in an environment they feel comfortable in, learn a little and move on. – Matt Bracewell Mar 5 '15 at 9:09
  • for this action phpmyadmi doens't show the command doing the action . Not found it – Tebe Dec 3 '16 at 15:54
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    Wow, so much anger for an alternative solution that does the trick and compliments the answers that the OP requested for an ALTER SQL. – Ewen Aug 11 '17 at 1:45
1

I had to run this for a column introduced in the later stages of a product, on 10+ tables. So wrote this quick untidy script to generate the alter command for all 'relevant' tables.

SET @NeighboringColumn = '<YOUR COLUMN SHOULD COME AFTER THIS COLUMN>';

SELECT CONCAT("ALTER TABLE `",t.TABLE_NAME,"` CHANGE COLUMN `",COLUMN_NAME,"` 
`",COLUMN_NAME,"` ", c.DATA_TYPE, CASE WHEN c.CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH IS NOT 
NULL THEN CONCAT("(", c.CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH, ")") ELSE "" END ,"  AFTER 
`",@NeighboringColumn,"`;")
FROM information_schema.COLUMNS c, information_schema.TABLES t
WHERE c.TABLE_SCHEMA = '<YOUR SCHEMA NAME>'
AND c.COLUMN_NAME = '<COLUMN TO MOVE>'
AND c.TABLE_SCHEMA = t.TABLE_SCHEMA
AND c.TABLE_NAME = t.TABLE_NAME
AND t.TABLE_TYPE = 'BASE TABLE'
AND @NeighboringColumn IN (SELECT COLUMN_NAME 
    FROM information_schema.COLUMNS c2 
    WHERE c2.TABLE_NAME = t.TABLE_NAME);

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