4

Display the Employee details of all those working in a location which ends with ore in its location name

EmpID:Name:Designation:UnitName:Location:DateofJoining:Salary
1001:Thomson:SE:IVS:Mumbai:10-Feb-1999:60000
1002:Johnson:TE::Bangalore:18-Jun-2000:50000
1003:Jackson:DM:IMS:Hyderabad:23-Apr-1985:90000
1004:BobGL::ETA:Mumbai:05-Jan-2004:55000
1005:Alice:PA:::26-Aug-2014:25000
1006:LilySE:IVS::Bangalore:17-Dec-2015:40000
1007:Kirsten:PM:IMS:Mumbai:26-Aug-2014:45000
1004:BobGL::ETA:Mumbai:05-Jan-2021:55000

Expected output:

1002:Johnson:TE::Bangalore:18-Jun-2000:50000
1006:LilySE:IVS::Bangalore:17-Dec-2015:40000

Here's the code I tried, it's only showing the location but I want full details

cut -d ":" -f4 employee.txt | grep 'ore\>' 

EDIT: SOLVED

grep "`cut -d ":" -f5 employee.txt | grep 'ore\>'`$" employee.txt

got output:

1002:Johnson:TE::Bangalore:18-Jun-2000:50000
1006:LilySE:IVS::Bangalore:17-Dec-2015:40000

Thanks everyone for help :)

6
  • What is the reason for not using regex?
    – mattb
    Jun 20, 2021 at 10:12
  • 2
    awk with a regexp really is the way to go here... awk -F: '$5 ~ /ore$/' input.txt
    – Shawn
    Jun 20, 2021 at 10:25
  • cut -d ":" -f4 employee.txt | grep 'ore\>' heres the code it's only showing the location I want full details @anubhava Jun 20, 2021 at 10:26
  • @Shawn I'm new to this and for exam I must use grep so can't use awk. Jun 20, 2021 at 10:30
  • 3
    OP specified (without regex) please don't remove it otherwise answers will look irrelevant.
    – anubhava
    Jun 20, 2021 at 10:59

6 Answers 6

5

Here a non-regex approach using awk:

awk -F: -v s="ore" '(n=index($5,s)) && (n + length(s)-1) == length($5)' file

1002:Johnson:TE::Bangalore:18-Jun-2000:50000
1006:LilySE:IVS::Bangalore:17-Dec-2015:40000

Details:

  • index($5,s) function finds position of input string ore in fifth column i.e $5 of each line
  • (index($5,s) + length(s)-1) == length($5) check is to ensure that ore is the ending substring of $5

A regex approach would be simpler:

awk -F: -v s="ore" '$5 ~ s "$"' file
4
  • Thank you for explanation. Can we use same with grep? or is it only for awk? p.s. never used awk. Jun 20, 2021 at 10:43
  • 1
    Learn awk, it is more powerful and feature rich. btw grep cannot do it without regex
    – anubhava
    Jun 20, 2021 at 10:45
  • 1
    I start to appreciate awk more an more Jun 20, 2021 at 11:06
  • 3
    @Babbaranish don't use grep for anything involving matching on fields, awk is simpler, more robust and more easily extensible. If your string was, say .txt instead of ore you could use the awk solution as-is but you couldn't just use the same grep solution as you did for ore because now you have a regexp metachar (.) to have to add code to handle in the search string. Similarly if your input only had 5 fields instead of 7 you could again just use the awk solution as-is but you'd have to change any currently posted grep solution because your target string no longer has : after it.
    – Ed Morton
    Jun 20, 2021 at 14:59
5

We could go with this simple awk solution here. Without regex approach as per OP's requirement. Simple explanation would be: check if 5th field last 3 characters are ore then print that line.

awk 'BEGIN{FS=OFS=":"} substr($5,length($5)-2)=="ore"' Input_file

Generic answer: As per Ed sir's nice suggestion adding here more generic solution. Where one could set value of tail as per string needs to be looked upon.

awk 'BEGIN{FS=OFS=":"; tail="ore"} substr($5,length($5)-length(tail)+1)==tail' Input_file
0
4

Using just grep (With a regular expression; the only way you can avoid them in grep is using grep -F, which does literal string matching):

$ grep -E '^([^:]*:){4}[^:]*ore:' input.txt
1002:Johnson:TE::Bangalore:18-Jun-2000:50000
1006:LilySE:IVS::Bangalore:17-Dec-2015:40000

Explanation:

Using Extended instead of Basic Regular Expression syntax for readability:

Starting at the beginning of the line, matches four fields (0 or more non-: characters followed by a :), and then a fifth field that ends in ore (Again, 0 or more non-: characters, then o, r, e, and finally the : at the end of the field).

1
  • BRE version for comparison: grep '^\([^:]*:\)\{4\}[^:]*ore:' input.txt
    – Shawn
    Jun 20, 2021 at 10:47
4

Just in case you would change your mind to use regex.

Using awk:

$ awk -F: -v ends="ore" '$5~".*"ends' file.txt
1002:Johnson:TE::Bangalore:18-Jun-2000:50000
1006:LilySE:IVS::Bangalore:17-Dec-2015:40000

Using grep:

$ grep 'ore:' file.txt
1002:Johnson:TE::Bangalore:18-Jun-2000:50000
1006:LilySE:IVS::Bangalore:17-Dec-2015:40000

Or this:

$ grep -E '(.*:){4}.*ore:' file.txt
1002:Johnson:TE::Bangalore:18-Jun-2000:50000
1006:LilySE:IVS::Bangalore:17-Dec-2015:40000
0
0

fgrep "ore:" employee.txt

f(ast)grep is exact string match no regex (same as grep -F)

It would not know anything about which column it was matching, so that filter would have to happen before or after.

0
awk -F: '{if (substr($5,1)~"ore")print $0}' emp.txt

This works for exact col match

grep -Ri "ore" emp.txt 

This works for whole doc match

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