32

What would be an elegant, efficient and Pythonic way to perform a h/m/s rounding operation on time related types in Python with control over the rounding resolution?

My guess is that it would require a time modulo operation. Illustrative examples:

  • 20:11:13 % (10 seconds) => (3 seconds)
  • 20:11:13 % (10 minutes) => (1 minutes and 13 seconds)

Relevant time related types I can think of:

  • datetime.datetime \ datetime.time
  • struct_time
4

7 Answers 7

18

For a datetime.datetime rounding, see this function: https://stackoverflow.com/a/10854034/1431079

Sample of use:

print roundTime(datetime.datetime(2012,12,31,23,44,59,1234),roundTo=60*60)
2013-01-01 00:00:00
15

How about use datetime.timedeltas:

import time
import datetime as dt

hms=dt.timedelta(hours=20,minutes=11,seconds=13)

resolution=dt.timedelta(seconds=10)
print(dt.timedelta(seconds=hms.seconds%resolution.seconds))
# 0:00:03

resolution=dt.timedelta(minutes=10)
print(dt.timedelta(seconds=hms.seconds%resolution.seconds))
# 0:01:13
1
  • 5
    That would work with datetime.time but not with datetime.datetime as you didn't take into account the date Aug 17, 2011 at 7:14
5

This will round up time data to a resolution as asked in the question:

import datetime as dt

current = dt.datetime.now()
current_td = dt.timedelta(
    hours = current.hour, 
    minutes = current.minute, 
    seconds = current.second, 
    microseconds = current.microsecond)

# to seconds resolution
to_sec = dt.timedelta(seconds = round(current_td.total_seconds()))
print(dt.datetime.combine(current, dt.time(0)) + to_sec)

# to minute resolution
to_min = dt.timedelta(minutes = round(current_td.total_seconds() / 60))
print(dt.datetime.combine(current, dt.time(0)) + to_min)

# to hour resolution
to_hour = dt.timedelta(hours = round(current_td.total_seconds() / 3600))
print(dt.datetime.combine(current, dt.time(0)) + to_hour)
3

You can convert both times to seconds, do the modulo operati

from datetime import time

def time2seconds(t):
    return t.hour*60*60+t.minute*60+t.second

def seconds2time(t):
    n, seconds = divmod(t, 60)
    hours, minutes = divmod(n, 60)
    return time(hours, minutes, seconds)

def timemod(a, k):
    a = time2seconds(a)
    k = time2seconds(k)
    res = a % k
    return seconds2time(res)

print(timemod(time(20, 11, 13), time(0,0,10)))
print(timemod(time(20, 11, 13), time(0,10,0)))

Outputs:

00:00:03
00:01:13
3

I use following code snippet to round to the next hour:

import datetime as dt

tNow  = dt.datetime.now()
# round to the next full hour
tNow -= dt.timedelta(minutes = tNow.minute, seconds = tNow.second, microseconds =  tNow.microsecond)
tNow += dt.timedelta(hours = 1)
3
  • that doesn't answer the question at all Nov 24, 2013 at 21:04
  • 2
    It's actually the only answer that directly answers the question title, which is about rounding (and happens to be what I'm looking for). The question body contradicts the title. This is just a bad question. Thanks, PTH. Apr 5, 2015 at 15:57
  • 4
    Careful: if tNow is already rounded to the nearest hour, then this will increment by an hour instead of doing nothing.
    – Adriano
    May 29, 2016 at 7:49
2

I think I'd convert the time in seconds, and use standard modulo operation from that point.

20:11:13 = 20*3600 + 11*60 + 13 = 72673 seconds

72673 % 10 = 3

72673 % (10*60) = 73

This is the easiest solution I can think about.

1
  • If you wanted to bother with special cases, modulo n seconds, where n is in (2,3,4,5,10,12,15,20,30), can be done with just the seconds part.
    – PaulMcG
    Jul 24, 2011 at 11:57
0

Here is a lossy* version of hourly rounding:

dt = datetime.datetime
now = dt.utcnow()
rounded = dt.utcfromtimestamp(round(now.timestamp() / 3600, 0) * 3600)

Same principle can be applied to different time spans.

*The above method assumes UTC is used, as any timezone information will be destroyed in conversion to timestamp.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.