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I have a list of tuples, each containing two integers followed by a string. I would like to filter out substrings from this list but base it on the first two integers of the tuple and not the string itself.

For example

[(0, 7, 'Lorenzo'), (0, 16, 'Lorenzo Malburto'), (3, 7, 'enzo'), (8, 16, 'Malburto'), (9, 13, 'albu'), (24, 32, 'American'), (25, 32, 'merican'), (33, 50, 'singer-songwriter'), (34, 50, 'inger-songwriter'), (44, 47, 'wri'), (44, 50, 'writer'), (53, 61, 'Malburto'), (54, 58, 'albu'), (90, 97, 'Lorenzo'), (93, 97, 'enzo')]

I would like the final list to be

['Lorenzo Malburto', 'American', 'singer-songwriter', 'Lorenzo', 'Malburto']

I duplicated the list and I tried to check, for each tuple, that the string element was a substring for any of the other strings and was also not equal to the string

for sub in duplicates:
    if any(sub in s and sub!= s for s in original_list):
       #further actions

but that resulted in

['Lorenzo Malburto', 'American', 'singer-songwriter']

With 'Lorenzo' and 'Malburto' missing. That is why I was wondering if this can be done based on the integers. This way 'enzo' would be filtered out because 3 - 7 is contained in the range of 0 - 16 that is 'Lorenzo Malburto' but one of the 'Lorenzo' won't be filtered out because 90 - 97 isn't.

How could this be achieved? Or is there a smarter way to go about this?

4
  • It's not entirely clear to me what you're asking about. What are the criteria you want to filter on? Is it overlapping intervals of the integers? That doesn't seem too hard to do, but it's not obvious to me which strings you want (always the largest of any overlapping ones?). Can there ever be partly overlapping strings, like "foobar" and "barbaz" if the original had "foobarbaz"?
    – Blckknght
    Jun 22, 2021 at 18:58
  • You can build up these continuous ranges when iterating through, but... how did you generate this data? It looks like index ranges. Maybe would be better to have the right data to begin with?
    – blueteeth
    Jun 22, 2021 at 18:59
  • I would like to keep the string associated with the largest 'range' of integers and anything else that is contained in this range just discard. I cannot alter the data used to generate these lists. There are spelling mistakes in them that lead to this performance but they are human generated data, so post-processing is my only option.
    – Paschalis
    Jun 22, 2021 at 19:03
  • Check geeksforgeeks.org/merging-intervals
    – Vishnudev
    Jun 22, 2021 at 19:09

1 Answer 1

3

You use compare only using the indices doing something like that:

items = [
 (0, 7, 'Lorenzo'),
 (0, 16, 'Lorenzo Malburto'),
 (3, 7, 'enzo'),
 (8, 16, 'Malburto'),
 (9, 13, 'albu'),
 (24, 32, 'American'),
 (25, 32, 'merican'),
 (33, 50, 'singer-songwriter'),
 (34, 50, 'inger-songwriter'),
 (44, 47, 'wri'),
 (44, 50, 'writer'),
 (53, 61, 'Malburto'),
 (54, 58, 'albu'),
 (90, 97, 'Lorenzo'),
 (93, 97, 'enzo')]

# Added solely for readability
# If you decide to use tuples, you can replace 
#   - item.start with item[0]
#   - item.end with item[1]
#   - item.value with item[2]
import collections
Item = collections.namedtuple('Item', ('start', 'end', 'value'))
items = [Item(*value) for value in items]

def uniquefy(items):
    results = []
    previous_item = None
    
    for current_item in items:
        # If it's the first iteration, define the current range
        if previous_item is None:
            previous_item = current_item
            continue
        
        # Detect if the current item corresponds to a new range
        # If the previous range is [0, 5] and the current range is [7, 10]
        # (note that 7 > 5), add the previous range to results and update
        # the current range
        if current_item.start > previous_item.end:
            results.append(previous_item)
            previous_item = current_item
            continue
        
        # Detect if the current item corresponds to the same range but wider
        # If the previous range is [0, 5] and the current range is [3, 10]
        # (note that 0 < 3 < 5 < 10), update the current range
        if current_item.start <= previous_item.start <= previous_item.end <= current_item.end:
            previous_item = current_item
    
    # If there's still a value to be added to results
    if previous_item is not None:
        results.append(previous_item)
        
    return [item.value for item in results]
        
print(uniquefy(items))
# Outputs ['Lorenzo Malburto', 'American', 'singer-songwriter', 'Malburto', 'Lorenzo']
2
  • 1
    Very comprehensive solution indeed.
    – Vishnudev
    Jun 22, 2021 at 19:24
  • Thanks enzo (the irony is not lost on me) works very well!
    – Paschalis
    Jun 22, 2021 at 19:31

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