124

This question already has an answer here:

how would i get the File extension of the file in a variable? like if I have a file as 1.txt I need the txt part of it.

marked as duplicate by Sirko, Dhaval Marthak, James Kingsbery, greg-449, iandotkelly Jan 28 '14 at 15:05

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10 Answers 10

281

A variant that works with all of the following inputs:

  • "file.name.with.dots.txt"
  • "file.txt"
  • "file"
  • ""
  • null
  • undefined

would be:

var re = /(?:\.([^.]+))?$/;

var ext = re.exec("file.name.with.dots.txt")[1];   // "txt"
var ext = re.exec("file.txt")[1];                  // "txt"
var ext = re.exec("file")[1];                      // undefined
var ext = re.exec("")[1];                          // undefined
var ext = re.exec(null)[1];                        // undefined
var ext = re.exec(undefined)[1];                   // undefined

Explanation

(?:         # begin non-capturing group
  \.        #   a dot
  (         #   begin capturing group (captures the actual extension)
    [^.]+   #     anything except a dot, multiple times
  )         #   end capturing group
)?          # end non-capturing group, make it optional
$           # anchor to the end of the string
  • 6
    @Tomalak... this is cool! would you mind explaining what each part of the reg ex is doing? – Hristo Feb 8 '12 at 20:03
  • 30
    @Hristo Certainly not. See above. – Tomalak Feb 8 '12 at 20:57
  • 3
    I'd suggest using var re = /(?:\.([^./]+))?$/; to capture following case as well: a.b/c -> c is the file and has no suffix – Christian Mar 28 '13 at 15:09
  • 3
    @Waxolunist Definitely, if you expect paths. But you'd have to work with system specific separators, the forward slash alone will not do. However, the question was about filenames. – Tomalak Mar 28 '13 at 15:24
  • 1
    @MiJyn Yes. But HTTP has nothing to do with the question. – Tomalak Jul 25 '13 at 23:13
172

Use the lastIndexOf method to find the last period in the string, and get the part of the string after that:

var ext = fileName.substr(fileName.lastIndexOf('.') + 1);
  • Doesn't work with "file" variants (ie no extension). – Crescent Fresh Mar 25 '09 at 14:48
  • 21
    Actually, it does. It returns the entire file name, which is as good as anything in that case IMO. If you want an empty string instead, you'll need to use an (gasp!) if statement. Also, if using node.js with JavaScript, see the "path" built-in module. – Jon Watte Jul 19 '11 at 3:14
  • const extension = path.extname(url); – NicoLA Mar 12 at 21:14
152

I personally prefer to split the string by . and just return the last array element :)

var fileExt = filename.split('.').pop();

If there is no . in filename you get the entire string back.

Examples:

'some_value'                                   => 'some_value'
'.htaccess'                                    => 'htaccess'
'../images/something.cool.jpg'                 => 'jpg'
'http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_pop.asp' => 'asp'
'http://stackoverflow.com/questions/680929'    => 'com/questions/680929'
  • Thank you! This one is the most clear to me. I'm passing the filename to a function, so I had to do a null check before calling split. – Lifes Jan 12 '13 at 0:59
  • 1
    Regex seems like overkill for this. This is simpler to think/reason about. I use this solution for most cases. – aashtonk May 2 '17 at 19:01
  • 1
    On the contrary 'split' is actually overkill. So many string/array allocations. – Sayam Qazi Jun 14 '18 at 5:51
21

I would recommend using lastIndexOf() as opposed to indexOf()

var myString = "this.is.my.file.txt"
alert(myString.substring(myString.lastIndexOf(".")+1))
12

Better to use the following; Works always!

var ext =  fileName.split('.').pop();

This will return the extension without a dot prefix. You can add "." + ext to check against the extensions you wish to support!

  • 2
    Repeated answer – insign Oct 14 '17 at 20:36
2
var x = "1.txt";
alert (x.substring(x.indexOf(".")+1));

note 1: this will not work if the filename is of the form file.example.txt
note 2: this will fail if the filename is of the form file

  • I got the thing I want thanx.... – santanu Mar 25 '09 at 10:07
  • 1
    You could use lastIndexOf, not sure of the browser support (might want to check ie6, but its easy to prototype your own).. you will just want to make sure you ensure you scan from prior to the last character.. so that 'something.' isn't matched, but 'something.x' would – meandmycode Mar 25 '09 at 10:09
  • yes, my solution is very simplistic, but I've documented it's drawbacks ;) – cherouvim Mar 25 '09 at 10:33
1

This is the solution if your file has more . (dots) in the name.

<script type="text/javascript">var x = "file1.asdf.txt";
var y = x.split(".");
alert(y[(y.length)-1]);</script>
1

Try this. May solve your problem.

var file_name_string = "file.name.string.png"

var file_name_array = file_name_string.split(".");
var file_extension = file_name_array[file_name_array.length - 1];

Regards

  • Better to use a regex. – itsbruce Nov 16 '12 at 13:30
  • @itsbruce using terms "better" and down-voting kinda sucks... This works. P.S. If question was "What is the best way to get the extension from file name" - I would agree completely... – Vladimir Djuricic Dec 21 '17 at 11:43
  • 1
    I didn't downvote. – itsbruce Dec 21 '17 at 13:10
0

get the value in the variable & then separate its extension just like this.

var find_file_ext=document.getElementById('filename').value;
var file_ext=/[^.]+$/.exec(find_file_ext); 

This will help you.

-1

I use code below:

var fileSplit = filename.split('.');
var fileExt = '';
if (fileSplit.length > 1) {
fileExt = fileSplit[fileSplit.length - 1];
} 
return fileExt;

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