37

The default MappingMongoConverter adds a custom type key ("_class") to each object in the database. So, if I create a Person:

package my.dto;
public class Person {
    String name;
    public Person(String name) {
        this.name = name; 
    }
}

and save it to the db:

MongoOperations ops = new MongoTemplate(new Mongo(), "users");
ops.insert(new Person("Joe"));

the resulting object in the mongo will be:

{ "_id" : ObjectId("4e2ca049744e664eba9d1e11"), "_class" : "my.dto.Person", "name" : "Joe" }

Questions:

  1. What are the implications of moving the Person class into a different namespace?

  2. Is it possible not to pollute the object with the "_class" key; without writing a unique converter just for the Person class?

1
  • So what is the story with this? Is there no way to prevent the "_class" field from getting stored in MongoDB? – hodgesz Oct 29 '11 at 17:32

12 Answers 12

29

So here's the story: we add the type by default as some kind of hint what class to instantiate actually. As you have to pipe in a type to read the document into via MongoTemplate anyway there are two possible options:

  1. You hand in a type the actual stored type can be assigned to. In that case we consider the stored type, use that for object creation. Classical example here is doing polymorphic queries. Suppose you have an abstract class Contact and your Person. You could then query for Contacts and we essentially have to determine a type to instantiate.
  2. If you - on the other hand - pass in a completely different type we'd simply marshal into that given type, not into the one stored in the document actually. That would cover your question what happens if you move the type.

You might be interested in watching this ticket which covers some kind of pluggable type mapping strategy to turn the type information into an actual type. This can serve simply space saving purposes as you might want to reduce a long qualified class name to a hash of a few letters. It would also allow more complex migration scenarios where you might find completely arbitrary type keys produced by another datastore client and bind those to Java types.

3
  • 1
    thank you for answering. Would it make sense to extract the type to a configuration; instead of keeping it with the object? For example, to provide the mapping in the code: (converter.configure(Contact.class, Person.class)). – Yuriy Nemtsov Jul 26 '11 at 20:02
  • 2
    Oliver, is there simple way to remove _class in 1.0GA? This doesn't work now. The simplest way it seems is: ((MappingMongoConverter)template.getConverter()).setTypeMapper(new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(null));. But it's ugly and wrong... – Shcheklein Jan 27 '12 at 9:19
  • 1
    What do you mean by 'doesn't work'? No need to do the casting job if you configure the MappingMongoConverter correctly upfront through either code or XML configuration. – Oliver Drotbohm Jan 27 '12 at 14:29
17

Here's my annotation, and it works.

@Configuration
public class AppMongoConfig {

    public @Bean
    MongoDbFactory mongoDbFactory() throws Exception {
        return new SimpleMongoDbFactory(new Mongo(), "databasename");
    }

    public @Bean
    MongoTemplate mongoTemplate() throws Exception {

        //remove _class
        MappingMongoConverter converter = new MappingMongoConverter(mongoDbFactory(), new MongoMappingContext());
        converter.setTypeMapper(new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(null));

        MongoTemplate mongoTemplate = new MongoTemplate(mongoDbFactory(), converter);

        return mongoTemplate;

    }

}
3
  • There is a caveat here: this code removes every type conversion code. For example Spring Data is not able anymore to convert (and store) LocalDate attributes. – ChrLipp Mar 4 '16 at 14:52
  • @mkyong, few snippets of your code are deprecated. Have added the working answer removing the deprecation warnings. Would you mind updating your answer here and as well as in your blog here. Thanks – harshavmb Jun 11 '17 at 5:07
  • Important enhancement for this: instead of creating a brand new MongoMappingContext, it is better to get it injected, otherwise it may cause problems, for example because this mapping context it not initialized with the application context. This was the source of problems I had with evaluation of SpEL expressions. – Constantino Cronemberger May 25 '18 at 13:45
6

If you want to disable _class attribute by default, but preserve polymorfism for specified classes, you can explictly define the type of _class (optional) field by configuing:

@Bean
public MongoTemplate mongoTemplate() throws Exception {
    Map<Class<?>, String> typeMapperMap = new HashMap<>();
    typeMapperMap.put(com.acme.domain.SomeDocument.class, "role");

    TypeInformationMapper typeMapper1 = new ConfigurableTypeInformationMapper(typeMapperMap);

    MongoTypeMapper typeMapper = new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(DefaultMongoTypeMapper.DEFAULT_TYPE_KEY, Arrays.asList(typeMapper1));
    MappingMongoConverter converter = new MappingMongoConverter(mongoDbFactory(), new MongoMappingContext());
    converter.setTypeMapper(typeMapper);

    MongoTemplate mongoTemplate = new MongoTemplate(mongoDbFactory(), converter);
    return mongoTemplate;
}

This will preserve _class field (or whatever you want to name in construtor) for only specified entities.

You can also write own TypeInformationMapper for example based on annotations. If you annotate your document by @DocumentType("aliasName") you will keep polymorphism by keeping alias of class.

I have explained briefly it on my blog, but here is some piece of quick code: https://gist.github.com/athlan/6497c74cc515131e1336

5
<mongo:mongo host="hostname" port="27017">
<mongo:options
...options...
</mongo:mongo>
<mongo:db-factory dbname="databasename" username="user" password="pass"                     mongo-ref="mongo"/>
<bean id="mongoTypeMapper"     class="org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.DefaultMongoTypeMapper">
<constructor-arg name="typeKey"><null/></constructor-arg>
</bean>
<bean id="mongoMappingContext"      class="org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.MongoMappingContext" />
<bean id="mongoConverter"     class="org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.MappingMongoConverter">
<constructor-arg name="mongoDbFactory" ref="mongoDbFactory" />
<constructor-arg name="mappingContext" ref="mongoMappingContext" />
<property name="typeMapper" ref="mongoTypeMapper"></property>
</bean>
<bean id="mongoTemplate" class="org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.MongoTemplate">
<constructor-arg name="mongoDbFactory" ref="mongoDbFactory"/>
<constructor-arg name="mongoConverter" ref="mongoConverter" />
<property name="writeResultChecking" value="EXCEPTION" /> 
</bean>
4

While, Mkyong's answer still works, I would like to add my version of solution as few bits are deprecated and may be in the verge of cleanup.

For example : MappingMongoConverter(mongoDbFactory(), new MongoMappingContext()) is deprecated in favor of new MappingMongoConverter(dbRefResolver, new MongoMappingContext()); and SimpleMongoDbFactory(new Mongo(), "databasename"); in favor of new SimpleMongoDbFactory(new MongoClient(), database);.

So, my final working answer without deprecation warnings is :

@Configuration
public class SpringMongoConfig {

    @Value("${spring.data.mongodb.database}")
    private String database;

    @Autowired
    private MongoDbFactory mongoDbFactory;

    public @Bean MongoDbFactory mongoDBFactory() throws Exception {
        return new SimpleMongoDbFactory(new MongoClient(), database);
    }

    public @Bean MongoTemplate mongoTemplate() throws Exception {

        DbRefResolver dbRefResolver = new DefaultDbRefResolver(mongoDbFactory);

        // Remove _class
        MappingMongoConverter converter = new MappingMongoConverter(dbRefResolver, new MongoMappingContext());
        converter.setTypeMapper(new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(null));

        return new MongoTemplate(mongoDBFactory(), converter);

    }

}

Hope this helps people who would like to have a clean class with no deprecation warnings.

1
  • Field injection is not recommended. SimpleMongoDbFactory is now deprecated. – Kamil Witkowski Feb 10 '20 at 15:34
3

This is my one line solution:

@Bean 
public MongoTemplate mongoTemplateFraud() throws UnknownHostException {

  MongoTemplate mongoTemplate = new MongoTemplate(getMongoClient(), dbName);
  ((MappingMongoConverter)mongoTemplate.getConverter()).setTypeMapper(new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(null));//removes _class
  return mongoTemplate;
}
2

I struggled a long time with this problem. I followed the approach from mkyong but when I introduced a LocalDate attribute (any JSR310 class from Java 8) I received the following exception:

org.springframework.core.convert.ConverterNotFoundException:
No converter found capable of converting from type [java.time.LocalDate] to type [java.util.Date]

The corresponding converter org.springframework.format.datetime.standard.DateTimeConverters is part of Spring 4.1 and is referenced in Spring Data MongoDB 1.7. Even if I used newer versions the converter didn't jump in.

The solution was to use the existing MappingMongoConverter and only provide a new DefaultMongoTypeMapper (the code from mkyong is under comment):

@Configuration
@EnableMongoRepositories
class BatchInfrastructureConfig extends AbstractMongoConfiguration
{
    @Override
    protected String getDatabaseName() {
        return "yourdb"
    }

    @Override
    Mongo mongo() throws Exception {
        new Mongo()
    }

    @Bean MongoTemplate mongoTemplate()
    {
        // overwrite type mapper to get rid of the _class column
//      get the converter from the base class instead of creating it
//      def converter = new MappingMongoConverter(mongoDbFactory(), new MongoMappingContext())
        def converter = mappingMongoConverter()
        converter.typeMapper = new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(null)

        // create & return template
        new MongoTemplate(mongoDbFactory(), converter)
    }

To summarize:

  • extend AbstractMongoConfiguration
  • annotate with EnableMongoRepositories
  • in mongoTemplate get converter from base class, this ensures that the type conversion classes are registered
2

For Spring Boot 2.3.0.RELEASE it's more easy, just override the method mongoTemplate, it's already has all things you need to set type mapper. See the following example:

@Configuration
@EnableMongoRepositories(
// your package ...
)
public class MongoConfig extends AbstractMongoClientConfiguration {

    // .....

    @Override
    public MongoTemplate mongoTemplate(MongoDatabaseFactory databaseFactory, MappingMongoConverter converter) {
        // remove __class field from mongo
        converter.setTypeMapper(new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(null));
        return super.mongoTemplate(databaseFactory, converter);
    }

    // .....

}
1
@Configuration
public class MongoConfig {

    @Value("${spring.data.mongodb.database}")
    private String database;

    @Value("${spring.data.mongodb.host}")
    private String host;

    public @Bean MongoDbFactory mongoDbFactory() throws Exception {
        return new SimpleMongoDbFactory(new MongoClient(host), database);
    }

    public @Bean MongoTemplate mongoTemplate() throws Exception {

        MappingMongoConverter converter = new MappingMongoConverter(new DefaultDbRefResolver(mongoDbFactory()),
                new MongoMappingContext());
        converter.setTypeMapper(new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(null));

        MongoTemplate mongoTemplate = new MongoTemplate(mongoDbFactory(), converter);

        return mongoTemplate;

    }

}
1
  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! While this code snippet may solve the problem, it doesn't explain why or how it answers the question. Please include an explanation for your code, as that really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – Samuel Philipp Jul 13 '19 at 11:13
0

you just need to add the @TypeAlias annotation to the class defintion over changing the type mapper

0

The correct answer above seems to be using a number of deprecated dependencies. For example if you check the code, it mentions MongoDbFactory which is deprecated in the latest Spring release. If you happen to be using MongoDB with Spring-Data in 2020, this solution seems to be older. For instant results, check this snippet of code. Works 100%. Just Create a new AppConfig.java file and paste this block of code. You'll see the "_class" property disappearing from the MongoDB document.

package "Your Package Name";

import org.apache.naming.factory.BeanFactory;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.NoSuchBeanDefinitionException;  
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.data.convert.CustomConversions;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.MongoDatabaseFactory;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.MongoTemplate;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.DbRefResolver;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.DefaultDbRefResolver;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.DefaultMongoTypeMapper;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.convert.MappingMongoConverter;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.MongoMappingContext;

@Configuration
public class AppConfig {

@Autowired
MongoDatabaseFactory mongoDbFactory;
@Autowired
MongoMappingContext mongoMappingContext;

@Bean
public MappingMongoConverter mappingMongoConverter() {

    DbRefResolver dbRefResolver = new DefaultDbRefResolver(mongoDbFactory);
    MappingMongoConverter converter = new MappingMongoConverter(dbRefResolver, mongoMappingContext);
    converter.setTypeMapper(new DefaultMongoTypeMapper(null));

    return converter;
    }

}
0

I've tried the solutions above, some of them don't work in combination with auditing, and none seems to set correctly the MongoCustomConversions

A solution that works for me is the following

@Configuration
public class MongoConfig {

    @Bean
    public MappingMongoConverter mappingMongoConverterWithCustomTypeMapper(
            MongoDatabaseFactory factory,
            MongoMappingContext context,
            MongoCustomConversions conversions) {
        DbRefResolver dbRefResolver = new DefaultDbRefResolver(factory);
        MappingMongoConverter mappingConverter = new MappingMongoConverter(dbRefResolver, context);
        mappingConverter.setCustomConversions(conversions);

        /**
         * replicate the way that Spring
         * instantiates a {@link DefaultMongoTypeMapper}
         * in {@link MappingMongoConverter#MappingMongoConverter(DbRefResolver, MappingContext)}
         */
        CustomMongoTypeMapper customTypeMapper = new CustomMongoTypeMapper(
                context,
                mappingConverter::getWriteTarget);
        mappingConverter.setTypeMapper(customTypeMapper);
        return mappingConverter;
    }
}

public class CustomMongoTypeMapper extends DefaultMongoTypeMapper {

    public CustomMongoTypeMapper(
            MappingContext<? extends PersistentEntity<?, ?>, ?> mappingContext,
            UnaryOperator<Class<?>> writeTarget) {
        super(DefaultMongoTypeMapper.DEFAULT_TYPE_KEY, mappingContext, writeTarget);
    } 

    @Override
    public TypeInformation<?> readType(Bson source) {

    /**
     * do your conversion here, and eventually return
     */
    return super.readType(source);
    }
}

As an alternative, you could use a BeanPostProcessor to detect the creation of a mappingMongoConverter, and add your converter there.

Something like

public class MappingMongoConverterHook implements BeanPostProcessor {
    @Override
    public Object postProcessAfterInitialization(Object bean, String beanName) throws BeansException {
        if ("mappingMongoConverter" == beanName) {
            ((MappingMongoConverter) bean).setTypeMapper(new CustomMongoTypeMapper());
        }
        return bean;
    }
}

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