I used this :

u = unicode(text, 'utf-8')

But getting error with Python 3 (or... maybe I just forgot to include something) :

NameError: global name 'unicode' is not defined

Thank you.

  • 14
    If there's an awesome reason to upgrade to python 3 it is unicode by default. – JBernardo Jul 25 '11 at 5:49
up vote 97 down vote accepted

Literal strings are unicode by default in Python3

Assuming that text is a bytes object, just use text.decode('utf-8')

unicode of Python2 is equivalent to str in Python3, so you can also write

str(text, 'utf-8')

if you prefer

  • 33
    TypeError: decoding str is not supported – Gank Apr 18 '16 at 13:49
  • 6
    @Gank, In Python3 a str is unicode, ie. it is "decoded" so it makes no sense to call decode on it – John La Rooy Apr 19 '16 at 9:43
  • Same TypeError. Please just replace with str(txt), or the code from @magicrebirth below – Simon Oct 28 '17 at 18:37
  • The original sample is not clear. So in python3, if you want to do str(text, 'utf-8'), text must be a string binary. e.g. str(b'this is a binary', 'utf-8') – killua8p Aug 22 at 4:13

What's new in Python 3.0 says:

All text is Unicode; however encoded Unicode is represented as binary data

If you want to ensure you are outputting utf-8, here's an example from this page on unicode in 3.0:

b'\x80abc'.decode("utf-8", "strict")
  • 1
    this is exactly what we need for '\x80abc'.decode("utf-8", "strict") in Python 2, thanks – hylepo Jan 2 '17 at 3:31

As a workaround, I've been using this:

# Fix Python 2.x.
try:
    UNICODE_EXISTS = bool(type(unicode))
except NameError:
    unicode = lambda s: str(s)
  • 9
    Why are you using a lambda function? These methods are called the same way in any case. This is a simpler variation: try: unicode = str; except: pass. – Nicolas Bouliane Oct 25 '17 at 10:02
  • It seems like you can just do unicode = str since it won't fail in either 2 or 3 – Nickolai May 25 at 22:23
  • Or from six import u as unicode which I'd prefer simply because it's more self-documenting (since six is a 2/3 compatibility layer) than unicode = str – Nickolai May 25 at 22:25

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