5

Please assume the following NumPy array:

A = array([1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])

I would like to find the indices of this array that N consecutive values are equal to zero (inclusive).

For example, assume N=3. We know that A[2]=0 while A[3]>0. Thus, the second element of array A is not with three consecutive zero value (inclusive). A desirable outcome for array A would look like the below:

B = array([False, False, False, False, True, True, True, True, False, False])

I can write a loop as the answer to this question:

N = 3
A = np.array([1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
B = np.zeros(len(A), dtype=bool)
for i in range(len(A)):
   if (i + N <= len(A)) and (sum(A[i:i + N]) == 0):
      B[i] = True

Since matrix A could be much larger and I need to do the above search process millions of times, I need the fastest possible way. What would be your suggestion?

6
  • Do you need the B array to be constructed in such a way? Or are you OK/better off with a list of indices where the blocks are found? I find this to be a good use case for generators, if we relax the constraint of needing B.
    – norok2
    Apr 14, 2022 at 9:41
  • 1
    How big is N in practice (eg. 3, 5, 10, 100, 1000 ?) and how big is also A? Besides this, you says that A is a matrix but it is an array. Is it a row/column of a 2D array or something bigger? Apr 14, 2022 at 11:31
  • 1
    Is A always going to be consisting only of 0s and 1s?
    – norok2
    Apr 14, 2022 at 12:21
  • @norok2, we can relax the constraint of needing B. I just need the indices of the eligible blocks. Also, I have A1 and A2; A1 is always 0s and 1s. A2 could get integer values. For A2, I also need a similar search process, but I should ensure that consecutive integer values are less than or equal to a predefined value.
    – mdslt
    Apr 15, 2022 at 13:37
  • 1
    @Ali_Sh when dealing with optimization, some systems respond better than others. It may well be that on some other system, yet another solution is the fastest for those input sizes and content. Saying that this or that solution has been proved to be the fastest is a bit of an overstatement anyways. Anyway, I personally liked a lot a couple of other approaches. I will modify my answer to add some more comments.
    – norok2
    Apr 15, 2022 at 21:12

9 Answers 9

6
+50

TL;DR

This is a significant improvement over the original approach as long as the block size N (below referred to as m or size) is large enough, and the input has a significant number of non-zero values:

import numpy as np
import numba as nb


@nb.njit
def find_blocks_while2_nb(arr, size, value):
    n = arr.size
    result = np.zeros(n, dtype=np.bool_)
    i = j = 0
    while i < n - size + 1:
        # last iteration found a block, only checking one value
        if j < i and arr[i + size - 1] == value:
            result[i] = True
            i += 1
        else:
            # search backward for index of last non-block value
            j = i + size - 1
            while j >= i and arr[j] == value:
                j -= 1
            if j < i:
                # block found, advance by 1
                result[i] = True
                i += 1
            else:
                # block not found, advance by last non-block value occurrence
                j += 1
                i = j
    return result

Essentially it is a Numba accelerated version of your original approach with a number of micro-optimizations:

  1. The number of times the main loop is executed is reduced by setting proper limit to the main counter
  2. The part that checks if the block contains all the same values:
    • avoids a relatively expensive array slicing
    • returns the position where it failed
    • runs backward
    • avoids re-checking consecutive blocks

For small block sizes, more micro-optimized approach may be faster as introduced in other answers, and briefly discussed below.


Introduction

The problem of finding the indices where a block of identical values starts can be seen as a specialization of a classical problem in computer science: finding a sub-array within an array (discussed in some detail here).

In this case, the sub-string (i.e. the block) consists of a series of identical values, more precisely 0s.

Theory

The complexity of this problem depends, in general, on the size of the array (n) and the size of the block (m or size), as well as the actual values within them (obviously).

Of course, it is assumed that n > m, as it is clear that if n == m the solution is trivial, and when n < m the array cannot fit the block. For the same reason, no index above n - m can be found.

While a naïve implementation would require essentially two nested loops, one for string and one for sub-string (which would result is O(nm) computational complexity), it is possible to make use of the fact that the block consists of identical values to run the algorithm in guaranteed linear time O(n) and with constant memory requirement O(1).

However, under the assumption that the input array has a mixed distribution of both block and non-block values, it is possible to run in approx. O(n / (m - ε)) time and still with O(1) memory consumption. The ε < m - 1 is a parameter proportional to the probability of finding a non-block value.

The idea is that when trying to determine if a block starts at position i if the array has a non-block value at position j with j - i < m then the next position to evaluate is j + 1, since, the block cannot fit between i and j. Moreover, if the search starts from the back (i.e. at position i - m), then the number of position that are not checked is maximal for sufficiently heterogeneous inputs, as all j - i values do not need to be checked.

For similar reasons, if it is known that a block starts at position i, to check whether a block starts at position i + j with j < m, only the values between i + m and i + m + j needs to checked, and the values between i and i + m - 1 do not need to checked again.

Implementations

This a manual case where a generator is a perfect fit, because it is possible to leverage its lazy evaluation properties to perform the bit of computation only as needed. Additionally, it is not known in advance how large the result will be (i.e. it is possible to find many blocks or no blocks at all).

However, if this is part of a larger computation it may be faster to pre-allocate the size of the result and just modify the value its indices. There should not be a need to allocate more than n - m + 1 values. However, for compatibility with the requirements of the question, an array the size of the input is pre-allocated. If needed, it is easy to adapt the following implementations to avoid wasting this extra memory. More precisely, the solutions based on explicit looping can be converted to generators by replacing result[i] = True with yield i (or similar). Likewise, solutions that compute the boolean array natively can be converted to generators with something like:

for i in np.nonzero(result)[0]:
    yield i

The remainder of the analysis will assume that the target result is the boolean array.

One of the challenges of implementing this in pure Python is that explicit looping is relatively slow. For this reason, it is convenient to use some acceleration technique (e.g. Numba or Cython) to reduce computation time.

Alternatively, given that the algorithm consists essentially of two loops (one for the array and one for the sub-array) one may seek to vectorize one or both loops. However, do note that these approaches would necessarily run in O(nm) worst-case time.

The basic naïve approach is the following:

def find_blocks_for2(arr, size, value):
    n = arr.size
    result = np.zeros(n, dtype=np.bool_)
    for i in range(n - size + 1):
        all_equal = True
        for j in range(i, i + size):
            if arr[j] != value:
                all_equal = False
                break  # vectorized approaches may not have this
        if all_equal:
            result[i] = True
    return result

This can be improved in a number of directions. One way stems from the fact that the inner loop is actually useless, because it is sufficient to keep track of the number of consecutive "good" values present (this is essentially the same as MichaelSzczesny's answer):

import numpy as np


def find_blocks_for(arr, size, value):
    n = arr.size
    result = np.zeros(n, dtype=np.bool_)
    block_size = 0
    for i in range(n):
        if arr[i] == value:
            block_size += 1
        else:
            block_size = 0
        if block_size >= size:
            result[i - size + 1] = True
    return result

Note that this can be seen as a specialization of the Rabin-Karp algorithm where the role of the hashing is played by the block_size counter.

Another possible approach is to skip the second loop only when the last iteration already identified the presence of a block and have it running backward to maximize the jump to the next possible block:

import numpy as np


def find_blocks_while2(arr, size, value):
    n = arr.size
    result = np.zeros(n, dtype=np.bool_)
    i = j = 0
    while i < n - size + 1:
        # last iteration found a block, only checking one value
        if j < i and arr[i + size - 1] == value:
            result[i] = True
            i += 1
        else:
            # search backward for index of last non-block value
            j = i + size - 1
            while j >= i and arr[j] == value:
                j -= 1
            if j < i:
                # block found, advance by 1
                result[i] = True
                i += 1
            else:
                # block not found, advance by last non-block value occurrence
                j += 1
                i = j
    return result

Note that this can be seen as a specialization of the Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithm without the need of computing offsets for each value of the block (they are all the same).

A number of variations can be devised for the above approaches, all with the same asymptotic behavior but slightly different running time depending on the actual input. For example, one could change the order of the conditions to speed-up the case where many consecutive blocks are found, at the expenses of running more instructions elsewhere, or the other way around.

All these run just too slow without acceleration either with Numba, Cython or Pypy. Pypy uses a different interpreter and I will not discuss/benchmark it further.

Numba provides one of the most straightforward and effective acceleration (just apply a decorator), e.g.:

import numba as nb


find_blocks_while2_nb = nb.njit(find_blocks_while2)
find_blocks_while2_nb.__name__ = "find_blocks_while2_nb"

Cython can also be used, e.g. (using %load_ext Cython Jupyter magic), but to take full advantage of the compilation it would require extra care to make sure bottleneck code runs without Python interaction:

%%cython -c-O3 -c-march=native -a
#cython: language_level=3, boundscheck=False, wraparound=False, initializedcheck=False, cdivision=True, infer_types=True


import cython as cy
import numpy as np


cdef _find_blocks_lin_cy(long[::1] arr, char[::1] result, Py_ssize_t n, Py_ssize_t size, long value):
    cdef Py_ssize_t block_size = 0
    for i in range(n):
        if arr[i] == value:
            block_size += 1
        else:
            block_size = 0
        if block_size >= size:
            result[i - size + 1] = True


def find_blocks_lin_cy(arr, size, value):
    n = arr.size
    result = np.zeros(n, dtype=np.bool_)
    _find_blocks_lin_cy(arr, result, n, size, value)
    return result

Whether it is going to be faster Numba or Cython depends on how much optimization can be triggered by the code, and as such depends also on which combination of compiler and CPU is used.

Alternatively, either the inner or the outer loop (or both) can be vectorized. Of course this is most effective on whether it is run more the inner or the outer loop. The largest loop should be run vectorized for maximum speed-up.

Vectorizing the inner loop would lead to something close to this (similar to the original post, but with smaller boundaries and sum() replaced with np.all() which also sports short-circuiting):

def find_blocks_for_all(arr, size, value):
    n = arr.size
    result = np.zeros(n, dtype=np.bool_)
    for i in range(n - size + 1):
        if np.all(arr[i:i + size] == value):
            result[i] = True
    return result

Vectorizing the outer loop would lead to something close to this (similar to what is presented in DanielF's answer, but with overall cleaner code, especially avoiding unnecessary function calls):

def find_blocks_for_and(arr, size, value):
    result = (arr == value)
    for i in range(1, size):
        result[:-1] &= result[1:]
    result[1 - size:] = False
    return result

Vectorizing both loops would lead to something close to this (similar to one approach from NaphatAmundsen's answer):

def find_blocks_strides(arr, size, value):
    n = arr.size
    strides = (arr.itemsize,) * 2
    block = np.full(size, value, dtype=arr.dtype)
    # note that `as_strided()` does not allocate extra memory
    # the downside is that buffer overflow will occur and
    # extra care must be taken not to use data outside the boundaries
    check = np.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(arr, (n, size), strides)
    result = np.all(check == block, axis=-1)
    result[1 - size:] = False
    return result

The above code can be further specialized under the assumption that the input will contain only positive values and that block consists of zeros only. This would mean replacing np.all() calls with np.sum() or similar. One approach where this is actually beneficial is with the fully vectorized approach, where as_strided() can be replaced by computing the correlation with a non-zero block (similar to one approach from NaphatAmundsen's answer):

def find_blocks_0_conv(arr, size):
    n = arr.size
    result = np.zeros_like(arr, dtype=np.bool_)
    block = np.ones(size, dtype=arr.dtype)
    result[:1 - size] = (np.correlate(arr, block, 'valid') == 0)
    return result

Aside of the looping, the running time will also depend on how the code translates to hardware instructions and ultimately how fast are them. For example, if NumPy is compiled with full support of SIMD instructions, it may very well be that a vectorized (but not theoretically optimal) approach would outperform, for many input combinations, theoretically optimal approaches that are naïvely accelerated. The same could happen for approaches that are written in a way that acceleration techniques can make very good use of SIMD instructions. However, the extra speed they provide will be limited to specific systems (i.e. specific combinations of compilers and processors).

One such example is the following (essentially a polishing of Jérôme Richard's answer to avoid global variables and removing unnecessary looping):

def find_blocks_simd_nb_cached(arr, size, value=0, cache={}):
    assert size > 0

    if size not in cache:
        print('cached: ', list(cache.keys()))
        def find_blocks_simd_nb(arr, value):
            n = arr.size
            result = np.zeros(n, dtype=np.bool_)
            check = (arr == value)
            for i in range(n - size + 1):
                # using a `temp` variable avoid unnecessarily accessing the `check` array
                temp = check[i]
                for j in range(1, size):
                    temp &= check[i + j]
                result[i] = temp
            return result

        cache[size] = nb.njit(find_blocks_simd_nb)
    return cache[size](arr, value)

Benchmarking

Here, some benchmarks are reported. As always, they should be taken with a grain of salt.

Only the fastest approaches are considered, for varying input sizes, block sizes and values. The _nb and _cy (except for find_blocks_for_cy() are essentially non-optimized versions of the same functions without the _nb or _cy suffix from above.

Varying input size, block size = 4

Uniform distribution of 1s and 0s

bm1

All 0s

bm2

All 1s

bm3

Varying block size, input size = 600_000

Uniform distribution of 1s and 0s

bm4

All 0s

bm5

All 1s

bm6

Note that:

  • find_blocks_for_all() is actually fast for sufficiently large values of size
  • find_blocks_for_and() is very fast for smaller values of size and does not require Numba or Cython
  • find_blocks_for_nb() is essentially independent on the block size and performs overall really well
  • find_blocks_simd_nb() is very fast for small values of size but performs comparatively poorly for larger values
  • find_blocks_while2_nb() really shines for larger values of size and it is respectably fast for smaller values

(Full benchmarks available here).


1
  • 4
    That's briliiant to search backwards to find the largest step that shortens the running time for increasing N. Apr 13, 2022 at 20:46
5

For small values of N (not changing much at runtime), the best solution is to use a SIMD-friendly Numba implementation that is specialized for each possible specific N value. The compiler can generate a very efficient code when N <= ~30. For larger N values, the solution of @norok2 is start to be better since it can skip many items of the array as long as there are not too many 0 items. When the number of 0 is big, this function is still competitive as long as N <= 64. When N > 64, please use a better suited implementation.

# Cache dictionary meant to store function for a given N
cache = {}

def compute(A, N):
    assert N > 0
    if N not in cache:
        # Numba function to be compiled for a specific N
        def compute_specific(A):
            out = np.zeros(A.size, dtype=np.bool_)
            isZero = (A == 0).view(np.uint8)
            for i in range(isZero.size-N+1):
                allSame = isZero[i]
                for j in range(1, N):
                    allSame &= isZero[i+j]
                out[i] = allSame
            for i in range(A.size-N+1, A.size):
                out[i] = 0
            return out
        cache[N] = nb.njit(compute_specific)
    return cache[N](A)

The compiler can auto-vectorize this code with SIMD instruction (like AVX-2) so that 32~64 items are computed per cycle on modern x86 processors. Larger N values require more SIMD instructions causing the function to be less efficient. In comparison, implementations using conditional branches tends to be slow since a miss-predicted branch generally cost about 10~15 cycles on mainstream x86 processors and each iteration can only compute one scalar item at a time (ie. ~2 order of magnitude slower assuming the amount of work would be the same).


Benchmark

Here are results on my machine (Intel Xeon Skylake) with a random (32-bit) integer arrays of size 100_000. There is about 50% of 0 values in the array. The Numba compilation time is excluded in all implementations.

With N = 3:
 - Initial solution:         115_000 µs
 - Ali_Sh:                     1_575 µs
 - Naphat (stridetricks):        929 µs
 - Naphat (correlational):       528 µs
 - Michael Szczesny:             350 µs
 - Norok2:                       306 µs
 - Franciska:                    295 µs
 - This code:                     11 us <---

With N = 10:
 - Initial solution:         149_000 µs
 - Ali_Sh:                     1_592 µs
 - Naphat (stridetricks):      1_139 µs
 - Naphat (correlational):       831 µs
 - Michael Szczesny:             489 µs
 - Franciska:                    444 µs
 - Norok2:                        98 µs
 - This code:                     14 µs <---

With N = 30:
 - Ali_Sh:                       [FAIL]
 - Initial solution:         255_000 µs
 - Franciska:                  2_285 µs
 - Naphat (correlational):     1_936 µs
 - Naphat (stridetricks):      1_628 µs
 - Michael Szczesny:             647 µs
 - Norok2:                        30 µs
 - This code:                     25 µs <---

With N = 60:
 - Ali_Sh:                       [FAIL]
 - Initial solution:         414_000 µs
 - Naphat (correlational):     3_814 µs
 - Franciska:                  3_242 µs
 - Naphat (stridetricks):      3_048 µs
 - Michael Szczesny:             816 µs
 - This code:                     50 µs <---
 - Norok2:                        14 µs

We can clearly see that this function is the fastest one (by a large margin) except when N is big (in this case, the Norok2's code is faster).

3
  • 1
    I agree, your proposed method is the best on lower Ns and Norok is the best for bigger Ns (based on my latest test). As Fransicka solution ranked second for N = 10, so, it needs to be checked for correctness of the results if best of N < 10 are of importance; It failed in equality checks in my test, but I didn't focus on its results and ....
    – Ali_Sh
    Apr 15, 2022 at 5:12
  • 4
    The answers to this seemingly harmless question turn out to be an excellent knowledge base for algorithms, time complexity, (compiler/micro) optimizations and 'tricks'. Apr 15, 2022 at 15:03
  • Actually, DanielF's solution enjoys the same SIMD optimizations using only NumPy and should rival this solution for small N values.
    – norok2
    Apr 16, 2022 at 0:57
4

A solution with linear time complexity, compiled with numba.

The idea is to look at each element of A once and count occurrences of zeros in counter c. If a non-zero element is encountered, c is reset to 0. As long as c >= N the result array is set to True at the appropriate index.

import numba as nb  # tested with numba 0.55.1

@nb.jit
def numba_linear(A, N):
    B = np.zeros(len(A), dtype=np.bool_)
    c = 0
    for i in range(len(A)):
        c = c+1 if A[i] == 0 else 0
        if c >= N: B[i - N + 1] = 1
    return B

A = np.array([1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
numba_linear(A, 3)

Output

array([False, False, False, False,  True,  True,  True,  True, False,
       False])

Benchmark against @Nephat baseline_numba with @Mercury's loop optimization applied (sum was faster than any in my benchmarks).

import numpy as np

@nb.njit
def baseline_numba(A: np.ndarray, N: int):
    '''
    You may need to run this once first to see performance gains
    as this has to be JIT compiled by Numba
    '''
    B = np.zeros(len(A), dtype=np.int8)
    for i in nb.prange(len(A)-N+1):
        if A[i:i + N].sum() == 0:
            B[i] = 1
    return B

rng = np.random.default_rng()
A = rng.integers(2, size=20000)
N = 3
%timeit baseline_numba(A, N)
#10000 loops, best of 5: 120 µs per loop

%timeit numba_linear(A, N)
#10000 loops, best of 5: 29.4 µs per loop

np.testing.assert_array_equal(numba_linear(A,N), baseline_numba(A,N))
1
  • The main difference between any and sum is for parallelization; it can be done by any. parallel=Ture must be specified at decorator line to be parallelized, not just writing nb.prange. nb.prange have adverse effect, usually ( without "parallel=True" in the jit-decorator, the prange statement is equivalent to range), on performance if be used without parallel=Ture. The Nephat improved code can be ~x3.5 times faster than before by parallelizing. But your proposed code is much faster yet.
    – Ali_Sh
    Apr 13, 2022 at 10:55
3

I have implemented a few other alternatives that you could try:

  1. Use numba to JIT compile the loopy code
  2. Use np.correlate to do a signal-processing type of correlation, then use nonzero to obtain indices
  3. Same as above, but use stride_tricks to do the correlation instead

I would like to benchmark the solutions, but it is getting a bit late here. I can maybe do it after work tomorrow if you'd like.

I also use dtype=np.int8 for B since it is easier to visually confirm that the output is correct (see output).

import numpy as np
import numba
from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided

A = np.array([1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
N = 3


def baseline(A: np.ndarray):
    '''
    Your solution
    '''
    B = np.zeros(len(A), dtype=np.int8)
    for i in range(len(A)):
        if (i + N <= len(A)) and (sum(A[i:i + N]) == 0):
            B[i] = 1
    return B


@numba.njit()
def baseline_numba(A: np.ndarray, N: int):
    '''
    You may need to run this once first to see performance gains
    as this has to be JIT compiled by Numba
    '''
    B = np.zeros(len(A), dtype=np.int8)
    for i in range(len(A)):
        if (i + N <= len(A)) and (A[i:i + N].sum() == 0):
            B[i] = 1
    return B


def correlational(A: np.ndarray):
    '''
    Use a correlation operation
    '''
    B = np.zeros_like(A, dtype=np.int8)
    B[(np.correlate(A, np.full(N, 1), 'valid') == 0).nonzero()[0]] = 1
    return B


def stridetricks(A: np.ndarray):
    '''
    Same idea as using correlation, but with stride tricks
    Maybe it will be faster? Probably not. 
    '''
    u = np.array(A.itemsize)
    B = np.zeros_like(A, dtype=np.int8)
    B[(as_strided(A, (len(A) - N + 1, N), u * (1, 1)).sum(1) == 0).nonzero()[0]] = 1
    return B


print(baseline(A))
print(baseline_numba(A, N))
print(correlational(A))
print(stridetricks(A))

Output:

[0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0]
[0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0]
[0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0]
[0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0]
3
  • 4
    I did a few benchmarks. For A of length 10000 and N=100, correlational takes 1.13 ms, striketricks takes 894 µs, and baseline_numba takes 485 µs, so numba seems to be the best at scaling. The baseline numba is also slightly inefficient: change the loop to for i in range(len(A)-N+1) and change the if condition to if not A[i: i + N].any() -- this shaves down numba time from 485 µs to about ~380 µs.
    – Mercury
    Apr 12, 2022 at 22:05
  • The convolution approach only works if the input array does not contain negative numbers, otherwise any zero-sum block will show as a false positive.
    – norok2
    Apr 14, 2022 at 7:48
  • The same is true for the solution with strides, but it can be adapted to accept a wider input.
    – norok2
    Apr 14, 2022 at 8:38
3

You can use a convolution filter, to see the consecutive zeros. And as the "leftover" zeros at the end can't be True, if there isn't an N length sequence of them, you can always complete the result with Falses.

import numpy as np


N = 3
A = np.array([1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
conv=np.convolve(np.ones((N)),A,mode='valid')
B=np.where(conv==0,True,False)
B=np.append(B,np.zeros((N-len(A)%N),dtype=bool))    

the result is:

[False False False False  True  True  True  True False False]
1
  • Isn't this essentially the same as correlational() in Naphat's answer?
    – norok2
    Apr 14, 2022 at 12:24
3

Should be possible with only bitwise math. Not sure about speed, probably doesn't beat numba, but should top anything with a for loop otherwise.

def find_blocks(A, N):

    reduce = lambda x: np.logical_and(x[:-1], x[1:], out = x[:-1])
    
    x = np.logical_not(A)
    for i in range(N-1):
        reduce(x)
    x[-N+1:] = False

    return x

find_blocks(A, 3)
Out[]: 
array([False, False, False, False,  True,  True,  True,  True, False,
       False])
2
  • This solution deserves more love. It should be reasonably faster than non-accelerated approaches, and should outperform accelerated approaches in the limit of small N. On top of this, it requires only minimal temporary storage. Perhaps it could be written in a more polished way (func = lambda x: ... is typically considered poor style).
    – norok2
    Apr 14, 2022 at 13:44
  • Yeah, I just threw it together just before running off on holiday. Didn't expect I'd beat the numba answers but wanted to get the idea on the table that it could be solved recursively in a vectorized fashion without iterating through the whole data series.
    – Daniel F
    Apr 19, 2022 at 13:46
2

Finding consecutive values and related indices is one of subjects that have solution in other SO question. In this regard we can find range indices for repeated zeros and their numbers:

def zero_runs(a):
    iszero = np.concatenate(([0], np.equal(a, 0).view(np.int8), [0]))
    absdiff = np.abs(np.diff(iszero))
    ranges = np.where(absdiff == 1)[0].reshape(-1, 2)
    return ranges

# [[ 2  3]
#  [ 4 10]]

When we found the indices ranges, we can fill the 1D array by using

def filled_array(start, end, length):
    out = np.zeros((length), dtype=int)
    np.add.at(out, start, 1)
    np.add.at(out, end, -1)
    return out.cumsum() > 0


def filled_array_v2(start, end, length):
    out =np.bincount(start, minlength=length) - np.bincount(end, minlength=length)
    return out.cumsum().astype(bool)

So, by using the aforementioned functions and defining a master function as below:

def final(A, N):
    runs = zero_runs(A)
    repeats_cound = runs[:, 1] - runs[:, 0]
    # [1 6]
    suspected_ranges = runs[repeats_cound >= 3]
    # [[ 4 10]]
    start = suspected_ranges[:, 0]
    end = start + N + 1
    return filled_array(start, end, length=A.size)       # filled_array_v2(start, end, length=A.size)

# [False False False False  True  True  True  True False False]

In one of my benchmarks on data array volume 10000, this code ran faster than the proposed numba method by Naphat.

Some benchmarks (Colab)

By using any (instead sum) as @Mercury's loop optimization mentioned, we can improve Naphat's baseline_numba by parallelizing it usingnb.prange along with parallel=True in the decorator line.
By A size: 20000 on Colab:

# N ----> 3:

1000 loops, best of 5: 105  µs per loop     Norok
--------------------
100 loops, best of 5:  35   ms per loop     Nephat baseline
100 loops, best of 5:  730  µs per loop     Nephat baseline_numba
1000 loops, best of 5: 225  µs per loop     Nephat correlational
1000 loops, best of 5: 397  µs per loop     Nephat stridetricks
--------------------
1000 loops, best of 5: 42.3 µs per loop     Michael Szczesny (The fastest)
--------------------
1000 loops, best of 5: 352  µs per loop     This answer
1000 loops, best of 5: 279  µs per loop     Nephat baseline_numba PARALLELIZED
=================================================================
# N ----> 10:

1000 loops, best of 5: 25.3 µs per loop     Norok (The fastest)
--------------------
100 loops, best of 5: 46.8  ms per loop     Nephat baseline
100 loops, best of 5: 794   µs per loop     Nephat baseline_numba
1000 loops, best of 5: 318  µs per loop     Nephat correlational
1000 loops, best of 5: 433  µs per loop     Nephat stridetricks
--------------------
1000 loops, best of 5: 31.9 µs per loop     Michael Szczesny
--------------------
1000 loops, best of 5: 341  µs per loop     This answer
1000 loops, best of 5: 291  µs per loop     Nephat baseline_numba PARALLELIZED 
=================================================================
# N ----> 20

1000 loops, best of 5: 6.52 µs per loop     Norok (The fastest)
--------------------
1000 loops, best of 5: 31.5 µs per loop     Michael Szczesny
--------------------
1000 loops, best of 5: 350  µs per loop     This answer
1000 loops, best of 5: 292  µs per loop     Nephat baseline_numba PARALLELIZED
=================================================================
# N ----> 30

1000 loops, best of 5: 4.01 µs per loop     Norok (The fastest)
--------------------
1000 loops, best of 5: 31.8 µs per loop     Michael Szczesny

Latest benchmarks:

The following results show the best performances, respectively, based on my last test on the prepared colab link (the last two cells):

  • for N <10 ---> Richard, (==) Daniel
  • for 10 < N <20 ---> Richard, Michael, (==) Norok
  • for 20 < N <60 ---> Norok, Richard, Michael
  • for N >60 ---> Norok, Michael, Richard
3
  • There are some different results in the code that I think it will be solved. I will check and correct it. But as it is tested, I guess this solution will be faster than numba on large data.
    – Ali_Sh
    Apr 12, 2022 at 23:08
  • 2
    If you will test for larger values of N (say above ~20) my solution should be the fastest.
    – norok2
    Apr 13, 2022 at 14:14
  • @norok2, right, I have updated benchmarks for if N size be of importance. I have upvoted Michael and your answer due to professionally written in terms of performance and would be grateful if you explain why runtime of your proposed code will be decreased as N grows.
    – Ali_Sh
    Apr 13, 2022 at 15:54
1

This one is numpy only and O(len(A)) similar to the answer from Ali_Sh but shorter and quicker. It does require some awkward handling of the edges of the array. The choice for a smaller dtype for the cumsum is a micro-optimization that I'm not sure is worth it..

def numpy_linear(A, N):
    dtype = np.min_scalar_type(N)
    assert issubclass(dtype.type, np.unsignedinteger)
    # The cumsum can overflow for longer arrays
    # but the difference calculation will still be correct
    c = np.cumsum(A == 0, dtype=dtype)
    B = np.r_[c[N-1] == N, c[N:]-c[:-N] == N, np.zeros(N-1, bool)]
    return B
0

To Obtain one's index, you can start with the following method:

import bumpy as np

my__Truth = np.array([True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, False, True])

np.sort(my_Truth, in_place=my_Truth[0])

# ~ Obtain Index ~ #
index_values = np.where(my_Truth)

print(index_values)
# un-comment if using python2
# print index_values
1
  • 1
    Array B is the outcome of my question. I need to find it.
    – mdslt
    Apr 12, 2022 at 19:59

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