234

After connecting to the database, can I get the name of all the columns that were returned in my SqlDataReader?

383
var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

var columns = new List<string>();

for(int i=0;i<reader.FieldCount;i++)
{
   columns.Add(reader.GetName(i));
}

or

var columns = Enumerable.Range(0, reader.FieldCount).Select(reader.GetName).ToList();
  • 64
    it's insane that there is no enumerable interface that lets you iterate through the columns. – JohnFx Jun 16 '11 at 4:35
  • 53
    A bit shorter: columns = Enumerable.Range(0, reader.FieldCount) .Select(reader.GetName).ToList(); – Alex May 23 '13 at 14:05
  • 2
    This works great. I also found out that my column names were all uppercase unless I used quotes around the column name. SELECT id AS "MyId" FROM table; – styfle Jul 13 '13 at 0:02
  • sir its returning all columnnames in lowercase. Column names in table are all uppercase like OBJECTID and reader is returning lowercase like objectid – Muneem Habib Nov 17 '15 at 11:30
  • 1
    its Dim columns() As String = Enumerable.Range(0, cTab.FieldCount).Select(Function(n) cTab.GetName(n)).ToArray – swe Jan 16 '17 at 9:36
73

There is a GetName function on the SqlDataReader which accepts the column index and returns the name of the column.

Conversely, there is a GetOrdinal which takes in a column name and returns the column index.

  • 5
    Why on earth isn't this marked as answer? – user659025 Nov 26 '13 at 13:00
  • 3
    Two reasons: first, the original poster has not chosen an answer yet, and secondly, there are other answers that give more detailed description of the problem's 'solution' then just the existence of the functionality. Personally, I like Steven Lyons' answer the best as not only does it talk about GetName but also goes into FieldType and DataType. – Stephen Wrighton Nov 26 '13 at 14:56
  • 1
    GetOrdinal was perfect. I was looking for GetName, but much cleaner solution for my issue with GetOrdinal. – goodeye Jul 30 '15 at 1:52
37

You can get the column names from a DataReader.

Here is the important part:

  for (int col = 0; col < SqlReader.FieldCount; col++)
  {
    Console.Write(SqlReader.GetName(col).ToString());         // Gets the column name
    Console.Write(SqlReader.GetFieldType(col).ToString());    // Gets the column type
    Console.Write(SqlReader.GetDataTypeName(col).ToString()); // Gets the column database type
  }
15

Already mentioned. Just a LINQ answer:

var columns = reader.GetSchemaTable().Rows
                                     .Cast<DataRow>()
                                     .Select(r => (string)r["ColumnName"])
                                     .ToList();

//Or

var columns = Enumerable.Range(0, reader.FieldCount)
                        .Select(reader.GetName)
                        .ToList();

The second one is cleaner and much faster. Even if you cache GetSchemaTable in the first approach, the querying is going to be very slow.

  • Is there a way to do this with Values? – Travis Heeter Jul 27 '15 at 12:45
  • @TravisHeeter I dont get you. Find column names from values of what? – nawfal Jul 27 '15 at 12:47
  • I mean just an east way to get the values in the result set into a list, or perhaps the whole thing to an IEnumerable<dynamic> object. – Travis Heeter Jul 27 '15 at 12:54
  • @TravisHeeter yes could do reader.Cast<IDataRecord>().ToList(). I believe you could use dynamic keyword there instead of IDataRecord but with no benefit. DataTable was designed to ease onetime loading, so you could use that too but you lose the benefit of loading on demand (with data reader you could stop loading at any point), like var dt = new DataTable(); dt.Load(reader); return dt.AsEnumerable().ToList();. There are many libraries which can automate this for you, find them here stackoverflow.com/questions/11988441 and here stackoverflow.com/questions/1464883 – nawfal Jul 27 '15 at 13:12
  • I tried reader.Cast<IEnumerable<dynamic>> and .Cast<dynamic>, but it says, Cannot convert method group 'Cast' to non-delegate type 'dynamic'. Did you intend to invoke the method? what did I do wrong there? (I looked at your sources, but they required you to know the column name, which I don't) – Travis Heeter Jul 27 '15 at 13:23
7

If you want the column names only, you can do:

List<string> columns = new List<string>();
using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.SchemaOnly))
{
    DataTable dt = reader.GetSchemaTable();
    foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
    {
        columns.Add(row.Field<String>("ColumnName"));
    }
}

But if you only need one row, I like my AdoHelper addition. This addition is great if you have a single line query and you don't want to deal with data table in you code. It's returning a case insensitive dictionary of column names and values.

public static Dictionary<string, string> ExecuteCaseInsensitiveDictionary(string query, string connectionString, Dictionary<string, string> queryParams = null)
{
    Dictionary<string, string> CaseInsensitiveDictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
    try
    {
        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
        {
            conn.Open();
            using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand())
            {
                cmd.Connection = conn;
                cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                cmd.CommandText = query;

                // Add the parameters for the SelectCommand.
                if (queryParams != null)
                    foreach (var param in queryParams)
                        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(param.Key, param.Value);

                using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
                    dt.Load(reader);
                    foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
                    {
                        foreach (DataColumn column in dt.Columns)
                        {
                            CaseInsensitiveDictionary.Add(column.ColumnName, row[column].ToString());
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            conn.Close();
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw ex;
    }
    return CaseInsensitiveDictionary;
}
  • 1
    throw ex; is a worst practice. – asawyer Mar 8 '17 at 15:41
  • 2
    its just an example – Yakir Manor Mar 9 '17 at 11:03
  • 3
    Asawyer, you should at least say why. I assume you're going to say you should use "throw;" instead so that you don't lose the original strack trace details. – Brent Rittenhouse Mar 28 '17 at 17:42
3

I use the GetSchemaTable method, which is exposed via the IDataReader interface.

3

Use an extension method:

    public static List<string> ColumnList(this IDataReader dataReader)
    {
        var columns = new List<string>();
        for (int i = 0; i < dataReader.FieldCount; i++)
        {
            columns.Add(dataReader.GetName(i));
        }
        return columns;
    }
2

You sure can.


protected void GetColumNames_DataReader()
{
  System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection SqlCon = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection("server=localhost;database=northwind;trusted_connection=true");
  System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand SqlCmd = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM Products", SqlCon);

  SqlCon.Open();

  System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataReader SqlReader = SqlCmd.ExecuteReader();
  System.Int32 _columncount = SqlReader.FieldCount;

  System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("SqlDataReader Columns");
  System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(" ");

  for ( System.Int32 iCol = 0; iCol < _columncount; iCol ++ )
  {
    System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Column " + iCol.ToString() + ": ");
    System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(SqlReader.GetName( iCol ).ToString());
    System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(" ");
  }

}

This is originally from: http://www.dotnetjunkies.ddj.com/Article/B82A22D1-8437-4C7A-B6AA-C6C9BE9DB8A6.dcik

1

It is easier to achieve it in SQL

var columnsList = dbContext.Database.SqlQuery<string>("SELECT COLUMN_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = 'SCHEMA_OF_YOUE_TABLE' AND TABLE_NAME = 'YOUR_TABLE_NAME'").ToList();

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.