3

I am trying to define a class in the global scope which contains some dynamically-allocated arrays. When the class' constructor is called, the program does not have access to user-defined parameters read through a parameter file (i.e. the number of years in a simulation) thus it cannot allocate memory to the proper size. My idea was to allocate memory within a private function in the class, and then deallocate it using the destructor. Some example code:

class Simulation{
private:
    int initial_call; //a flag used to initialize memory
    double *TransferTracker;
public:
    Simulation();
    ~Simulation();
    void calc();
};

Simulation simulator; //global instance of Simulation

Simulation::Simulation()
{
   initial_call = 1;
}
Simulation::~Simulation()
{
    //when calling the destructor, though, the address is
    //0xcccccccc and the following attempt to delete produces
    //the compiler error.
    delete [] TransferTracker; //see error
}
void Simulation::calc()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < num_its; i++)
    {
         if (initial_call)
         {
             TransferTracker = new double [5];
             //The address assigned is, for example, 0x004ce3e0
             initial_call = 0;
         }
    }
    //even if this calc function is called multiple times, I see
    //that the address is still 0x004ce3e0.
}

The error I receive from the above code fragment is:

 Unhandled exception at 0x5d4e57aa (msvcr100d.dll) in LRGV_SAMPLER.exe: 0xC0000005: Access    
 violation reading location 0xccccccc0.

This error makes sense because I checked the memory address of TransferTracker when entering the destructor. My question is, why do we lose the address when entering the destructor? It probably has something to do with the fact that simulator is global; this paradigm seems to work fine if the class was not global. I am new to object-oriented programming so any help is appreciated!

EDIT: This was basically a blunder on my part and was helped by the answers. Two problems occurred: (1) the pointers were never set to NULL, thus creating confusion on trying to delete unallocated pointers. (2) There were actually two instances of the class in my scope, which was a mistake on my part. In the final code, there will only ever be one instance. Thanks everyone!

  • How is your destructor getting called? It is global so it only would be called obn program exit right? – Michael Dorgan Jul 25 '11 at 18:33
  • Yes that is correct; it is at the program exit. – Joe Jul 25 '11 at 18:35
3

You have to initialize the value of the instance variable TransferTracker to 0 in the constructor. The problem you're having is the destruction of the Simulation class without actually having assigned dynamic memory to TransferTracker.

Calling delete[] in the destructor with a null pointer is safe. The problem is that if you don't give a value to TransferTracker, it may have any undefined value, that will cause trouble trying to deallocate with delete[].

EDIT:

As per your edit, how do you assure that there is only one instance of the Simulation class? This has to do with if you include several .o files in your build, etc.

  • See my edits; I realize this looked like the case in my original question, but the allocation within calc is being called and it seems to work. – Joe Jul 25 '11 at 18:37
  • As far as I can tell, I have only declared it once. Is that a stupid answer to that question? – Joe Jul 25 '11 at 18:45
  • Thanks for your help; I am accepting your answer since it discussed multiple instances of the class. I also edited my question to discuss my stupid mistake. – Joe Jul 25 '11 at 18:48
5

Initialize the pointer to NULL (0)

Simulation::Simulation() : TransferTracker(NULL)
{
  initial_call = 1;
}
Simulation::~Simulation()
{
  //when calling the destructor, though, the address is
  //0xcccccccc and the following attempt to delete produces
  //the compiler error.
  if(TransferTracker) delete [] TransferTracker; //see error
  TransferTracker = NULL;
}

That way you can check wether or not it has been initialised when you want to delete it. It's best practice, so do it always, not only at construction

EDIT:

void Simulation::calc()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < num_its; i++)
    {
         if (initial_call)
         {
             if(TransferTracker) delete []  TransferTracker;
             TransferTracker = new double [5];
             initial_call = 0;
         }
    }
}
  • 1
    You don't have to test if TransferTracker is 0. delete will work in that case too. – Diego Sevilla Jul 25 '11 at 18:33
  • There is no need to check for NULL before calling delete operator, it does it for you. But setting it to NULL after delete is called is a good idea to protect yourself from doing crazy things if destructor is called twice. – user405725 Jul 25 '11 at 18:33
  • 4
    If the destructor is called twice crazy things are already happening. – AJG85 Jul 25 '11 at 18:34
  • See my edit; thanks for the clarification. I agree this is good advice, but I am attempting to allocate memory within the calc() function itself and it seems to be working. – Joe Jul 25 '11 at 18:36
  • 0xCCCCCCCC is the 'default' address for unallocated pointers, it's an implementation thing. That's why you should initialize all your pointers to NULL. After reading your edit, I don't see what the problem is.. You thought there was a problem because the pointer address was changing? – Tom Knapen Jul 25 '11 at 18:39
1

I suspect the cause is that your destructor is getting called when you haven't invoked the calc() function, therefore the memory hasn't been allocated yet.

You want to put in place a "guard" that will make sure that you've already allocated the memory before attempting to deallocate the memory for TransferTracker.

  • See my edits; I realize this looked like the case in my original question, but the allocation within calc is being called and it seems to work. – Joe Jul 25 '11 at 18:37
  • @Joe: are you sure that the instance that's getting destructed and causing the problems is actually the one that's having the allocation done? – Paul Sonier Jul 25 '11 at 18:42
  • That's a good question, Paul, I am almost sure there is only supposed to be one instance, how would another one appear without my knowledge? Is this the danger of trying to have a global instance of a class? – Joe Jul 25 '11 at 18:46

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