31

What is the best way in Python to determine what values in two ranges overlap?

For example:

x = range(1,10)
y = range(8,20)

(The answer I am looking for would be the integers 8 and 9.)

Given a range, x, what is the best way to iterate through another range, y and output all values that are shared by both ranges? Thanks in advance for the help.

EDIT:

As a follow-up, I realized that I also need to know if x does or does not overlap y. I am looking for a way to iterate through a list of ranges and and do a number of additional things with range that overlap. Is there a simple True/False statement to accomplish this?

  • 1
    Specify the characteristics of the range (step always equal +1? or can it be -2?) – Dor Jul 25 '11 at 19:23
  • 1
    My ranges are all in +1 steps. – drbunsen Jul 25 '11 at 19:29

10 Answers 10

47

Try with set intersection:

>>> x = range(1,10)
>>> y = range(8,20)
>>> xs = set(x)
>>> xs.intersection(y)
set([8, 9])

Note that intersection accepts any iterable as an argument (y is not required to be converted to a set for the operation). There is an operator equivalent to the intersection method: & but, in this case, it requires both arguments to be sets.

  • 1
    I find that intersection with operator & is much more intuitive. – schlamar Jul 25 '11 at 19:31
  • @ms4py Sometimes. Try [1,2] & [2,3]. The intersection method of set assures you that you can do it. – joaquin Jul 25 '11 at 19:35
  • 3
    @dr.bunsen This answer doesn't deserve all these upvotes, nor to be accepted. 1) This "solution" is 2.5 slower than the Andrew's solution (see comparison in my answer) 2) the result isn't sorted, since it is a set; that may be a drawback in some cases – eyquem Jul 25 '11 at 23:44
  • 1
    @eyquem maybe the OP feels more comfortable with the simplicity (you want intersection? then you do intersection), readability (no need for comments here) and the generality of this approach (it does not assume step 1 or same step for both ranges and you can use it for other iterables, not only for ranges). Speed is not always the more important factor (although the itersection approach is faster than the plaes & and much more faster than list comprehension (python 2.6), both still very interesting approaches,imho. Anyway, we are talking of several microseconds to execute the code here). – joaquin Jul 26 '11 at 13:30
  • 1
    Thanks for the comments and discussion. I ultimately choose this answer because of readability and the added benefit of duplicate removal with set(). – drbunsen Jul 26 '11 at 16:39
65

If the step is always +1 (which is the default for range) the following should be more efficient than converting each list to a set or iterating over either list:

range(max(x[0], y[0]), min(x[-1], y[-1])+1)
  • 7
    Really, this should be the accepted answer. It is a one line, O(1) intersection, whereas the others are O(n) at best, O(n^2) at worst. – Zoey Hewll May 24 '16 at 7:34
  • Some tests I ran indicate it may be marginally faster to check x[0] <= y[0] <= x[-1] etc etc, sequentially. But hardly significant. This is more elegant. – Neil Jan 8 at 13:05
  • 1
    This solution doesn't give us the correct output when there is no overlap between the two ranges. – Pedram May 9 at 19:47
  • Sure it does, if there is no overlap the result is an empty range as expected. – Andrew Clark May 13 at 16:45
14

You can use sets for that, but be aware that set(list) removes all duplicate entries from the list:

>>> x = range(1,10)
>>> y = range(8,20)
>>> list(set(x) & set(y))
[8, 9]
  • 1
    Well, ranges don't contain duplicates anyway. Also, using xrange is possible saves some (potentially much, depending on range sizes) memory during construction. – user395760 Jul 25 '11 at 19:30
10

One option is to just use list comprehension like:

x = range(1,10) 
y = range(8,20) 

z = [i for i in x if i in y]
print z
  • 2
    As far as I can see xrange.__contains__ from Python 2.x doesn't have this optimization. This is sloow under python 2.7: rng = xrange(20, 1000000000); 10 in rng – Mikhail Korobov Jun 13 '12 at 10:25
  • 2
    '10 in rng' (False) is slow and '100 in rng' (True) is fast under Python 2.7; both are fast under Python 3.2. – Mikhail Korobov Jun 13 '12 at 10:32
5

For "if x does or does not overlap y" :

for a,b,c,d in ((1,10,10,14),
                (1,10,9,14),
                (1,10,4,14),
                (1,10,4,10),
                (1,10,4,9),
                (1,10,4,7),
                (1,10,1,7),
                (1,10,-3,7),
                (1,10,-3,2),
                (1,10,-3,1),
                (1,10,-11,-5)):
    x = range(a,b)
    y = range(c,d)
    print 'x==',x
    print 'y==',y
    b = not ((x[-1]<y[0]) or (y[-1]<x[0]))
    print '    x %s y' % ("does not overlap","   OVERLAPS  ")[b]
    print

result

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [10, 11, 12, 13]
    x does not overlap y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [4, 5, 6]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [-3, -2, -1, 0, 1]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [-3, -2, -1, 0]
    x does not overlap y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [-11, -10, -9, -8, -7, -6]
    x does not overlap y

Edit 1

Speeds comparison:

from time import clock

x = range(-12,15)
y = range(-5,3)
te = clock()
for i in xrange(100000):
    w = set(x).intersection(y)
print '                     set(x).intersection(y)',clock()-te


te = clock()
for i in xrange(100000):
    w = range(max(x[0], y[0]), min(x[-1], y[-1])+1)
print 'range(max(x[0], y[0]), min(x[-1], y[-1])+1)',clock()-te

result

                     set(x).intersection(y) 0.951059981087
range(max(x[0], y[0]), min(x[-1], y[-1])+1) 0.377761978129

The ratio of these execution's times is 2.5

2

If you looking for the overlap between two real-valued bounded intervals, then this is quite nice:

def overlap(start1, end1, start2, end2):
    """how much does the range (start1, end1) overlap with (start2, end2)"""
    return max(max((end2-start1), 0) - max((end2-end1), 0) - max((start2-start1), 0), 0)

I couldn't find this online anywhere so I came up with this and I'm posting here.

2

This is the answer for the simple range with step=1 case (99% of the time), which can be 2500x faster as shown in the benchmark when comparing long ranges using sets (when you are just interested in knowing if there is overlap):

x = range(1,10) 
y = range(8,20)

def range_overlapping(x, y):
    if x.start == x.stop or y.start == y.stop:
        return False
    return ((x.start < y.stop  and x.stop > y.start) or
            (x.stop  > y.start and y.stop > x.start))

>>> range_overlapping(x, y)
True

To find the overlapping values:

def overlap(x, y):
    if not range_overlapping(x, y):
        return set()
    return set(range(max(x.start, y.start), min(x.stop, y.stop)+1))

Visual help:

|  |           |    |
  |  |       |    |

Benchmark:

x = range(1,10)
y = range(8,20)

In [151]: %timeit set(x).intersection(y)
2.74 µs ± 11.2 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)

In [152]: %timeit range_overlapping(x, y)
1.4 µs ± 2.91 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

Conclusion: even for small ranges, it is twice as fast.

x = range(1,10000)
y = range(50000, 500000)

In [155]: %timeit set(x).intersection(y)
43.1 ms ± 158 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

In [156]: %timeit range_overlapping(x, y)
1.75 µs ± 88.3 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

Conclusion: you want to use the range_overlapping function in this case as it is 2500x faster (my personal record in speedup)

1

If you want to find the overlap of ranges with arbitrary steps you can use my package https://github.com/avnr/rangeplus which provides a Range() class compatible with Python range(), plus some goodies including intersections:

>>> from rangeplus import Range
>>> Range(1, 100, 3) & Range(2, 100, 4)
Range(10, 100, 12)
>>> Range(200, -200, -7) & range(5, 80, 2)  # can intersect with Python range() too
Range(67, 4, -14)

Range() can also be unbound (when stop is None the Range goes on to +/-infinity):

>>> Range(1, None, 3) & Range(3, None, 4)
Range(7, None, 12)
>>> Range(253, None, -3) & Range(208, 310, 5)
Range(253, 207, -15)

The intersection is computed, not iterated, which makes the efficiency of the implementation independent of the length of the Range().

1

The answers above seem mostly overly complex. This one liner works perfectly in Python3, takes ranges as inputs and output. It also handles illegal ranges. To get the values just iterate over the result if not None.

# return overlap range for two range objects or None if no ovelap
# does not handle step!=1
def range_intersect(r1, r2):
    return range(max(r1.start,r2.start), min(r1.stop,r2.stop)) or None
0

Assuming you are working exclusively with ranges, with a step of 1, you can do it quickly with math.

def range_intersect(range_x,range_y):
    if len(range_x) == 0 or len(range_y) == 0:
        return []
    # find the endpoints
    x = (range_x[0], range_x[-1]) # from the first element to the last, inclusive
    y = (range_y[0], range_y[-1])
    # ensure min is before max
    # this can be excluded if the ranges must always be increasing
    x = tuple(sorted(x))
    y = tuple(sorted(y))
    # the range of the intersection is guaranteed to be from the maximum of the min values to the minimum of the max values, inclusive
    z = (max(x[0],y[0]),min(x[1],y[1]))
    if z[0] < z[1]:
        return range(z[0], z[1] + 1) # to make this an inclusive range
    else:
        return [] # no intersection

On a pair of ranges each with over 10^7 elements, this took under a second, independent of how many elements overlapped. I tried with 10^8 or so elements, but my computer froze for a while. I doubt you'd be working with lists that long.

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