0

What I want to do is this in effect:

this = object1

where this is the "this" keyword used within a class and object1 is the object I want "this" to point to. Is that possible?

essentially, I want

this == object1

to evaluate to true.

Edit for clarity:

Public class TestObject {
       private static HashSet<string> setOfNames = new HashSet<string>();
       private static List<TestObject > listOfObjects= new List<TestObject >();
       private string name = null;
     
       public TestObject (string name){
          if(setOfNames.contains(name)){
            foreach(TestObject o in listOfObjects){
               if(o.name.equals(name)){
                  this = o;
                  break;
               }
          } else{
              setOfNames.Add(name);
              this.name = name;
              listOfObjects.Add(this);
       }
    }

So what I want to do is if an object is ever created with the same parameters as an object before, I want the object to point to the object that was already created to avoid doing uncessary work.

6
  • 1
    It's unclear (to me) what the underlying effect that you're trying to achieve is. If you had two objects with the same this pointer what if both tried to free themselves? Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:08
  • 1
    Please edit your question to include a more detailed description of your problem you have. You cannot change the type of an object once it is created, but maybe you want to do something completely different (like casting or converting).
    – Progman
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:08
  • 1
    You can make this == object1 evaluate to true by overloading the == operator. Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:11
  • 2
    Sorry, but why do you think you want to do this. I'm sure you have a use case in mind (I can't imagine what it is).I'm guessing there's a way to achieve what you want using the language.
    – Flydog57
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:20
  • @Progman I have edited my question. Hopefully you understand what I am trying to do now. I want the memory address of this to be the memory address of o. Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:20

3 Answers 3

6

No, this (no pun intended) is not possible. this cannot be reassigned (in a class).

3
  • 2
    ...in a class. Somewhat oddly IMO, you can reassign this inside a struct.
    – Joe Sewell
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:23
  • Is there a way to do this in effect? Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:24
  • @JoeSewell thanks, I was not aware of this fact!
    – knittl
    Commented Jul 2, 2021 at 6:19
5

So what I want to do is if an object is ever created with the same parameters as an object before, I want the object to point to the object that was already created to avoid doing uncessary work.

Then you need a factory that creates your instance, a dictionary that maps and caches your instances and your class should implement IEquality<T> to make the lookup and the equality comparison effective.

Edit:

A simple version (without IEquality<T>) would look like:

public class TestObject {
       private static Dictionary<string, TestObject> _objectMap = new Dictionary<string, TestObject>();       
     
       public static TestObject GetInstance (string name){
          if(!_objectMap.TryGetValue(name), out var instance){
             instance = new TestObject(name);
             _objectMap.Add(name, instance;
          }
          return instance;
       }
       
       private TestObject (string name){
          Name = name;
       }
       
       public string Name {get;}
    }

In times of DI and uncoupled services one would not use a static method, but rather have another factory class with singleton scope.
And IEquality would still be useful because HashSets and Dictionaries need a good HashCodes.

4
  • This would work. It sounds like a pain though lol. Thank you for the answer! Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:28
  • 1
    @grantmartin Is using a struct an option? Since it will give you basically all of that functionality for free.
    – mjwills
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:29
  • @mjwills unfortunately not Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:29
  • 1
    @grantmartin ReSharper would create all the members for IEquality. Its not such a big deal as it seems. Sometimes this pattern is necessary+useful if you have e.g. have to rely on the fact that an instance with a certain Id can only exist once...
    – lidqy
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:34
5

Just for the record.
Within a struct, this is a valid LValue, i.e. you can assign something to this in struct code . E.g.:

struct Data
{
    public int Hi;
    public int Lo;

    public Data (Data other) {
      this = other;
    }
}

It's because of the copy semantics of ValueTypes, which have no object identity. But not possible for RefTypes aka classes.

1
  • 1
    Interesting. Didnt know that! Unfortunately, If I changed it to be a struct it would break everything lol Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 21:23

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